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Old 03-18-09, 12:13 PM   #1
b_rice42
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Miyata 1000 questions...

Hi! I'm new here.
I just inherited (literally) my grandfather's bike. It appears from my research to be a Miyata 1000. No pics yet, but soon. It has Suntour Mountech Derailleurs, Sugino AT 3 crank, center pull brakes, Surpurbe levers and Araya wheels. It even has original toe-clips with leather straps!
Serial # K575446

Any idea on the year? It's a very big frame. 63 i think. My grandfather was very tall. So am i, so thats good...
The bike is in great shape but has been sitting for sometime. What should i do (low budget) to get her back on the road?

Thanks in advance!
Brandon

Edit: Also, are the components worth saving? I want to keep as much original as i can. Are the Suntour Mountech any good?
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Old 03-18-09, 12:40 PM   #2
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The mountech works fine but apparently wears out quickly, due to a weak spring in the pulley pivot. It sounds like some parts may have been swapped around. But centerpull do you mean cantilever? Check this site to see how closely some of the parts match a given year.

The mountech would seem to be a replacement since they never came with them...

http://www.miyatacatalogs.com
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Old 03-18-09, 12:44 PM   #3
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Welcome to BF and C&V.

That's quite a sought-after touring model. Some folks really like the Mountech derailleurs, and some don't. T-Mar or someone else can give you the year, and I believe you'll get asked for pictures within a few posts.

You'll want to have good (likely new) new tires, tubes and cabling, you'll want to have someone re-grease the critical bearings (hubs, headset and bottom bracket), and make sure the chain is not worn and well lubed. It may sound like quite a bit to have done, and will almost certainly cost more than $100.00 to have these things done by the LBS, but you will end up with one of the very best, production line touring bicycles of all time to enjoy for a long time (well worth the investment IMO).

Cheers,

Z
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Old 03-18-09, 12:47 PM   #4
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I think some parts were swapped... It has the Sugino AT triple crankset which isn't on the '82... The color is a dark gun metal gray. I think it's the original paint, but with decals removed and some custom pin-stripping done.
I'll be able to take pics tonight to give more detail. This is my first road bike. I've always had mtb's but always wanted a good road bike. This one seems like a tank. What about tune up after a long sit? Replace cables? Chain? I'm not a mechanic so any insight will help avoid getting me taken for a sucker.

If anyone knows of a good shop in the SF Bay Area, let me know. This baby needs some TLC...
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Old 03-18-09, 12:49 PM   #5
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Does the bike have a sticker on the seat tube stating "splined triple butted" of "double butted chromoly"?
That will help narrow down the year. If a road bike is what you want, a road bike this is not. it's a loaded touring bike so yes it is kind of a tank by comparison to a true road bike. I am sure there are many people on this forum who would love to trade you something a little more nimble and light for your 1000.
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Old 03-18-09, 12:50 PM   #6
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Quote:
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Welcome to BF and C&V.

That's quite a sought-after touring model. Some folks really like the Mountech derailleurs, and some don't. T-Mar or someone else can give you the year, and I believe you'll get asked for pictures within a few posts.

You'll want to have good (likely new) new tires, tubes and cabling, you'll want to have someone re-grease the critical bearings (hubs, headset and bottom bracket), and make sure the chain is not worn and well lubed. It may sound like quite a bit to have done, and will almost certainly cost more than $100.00 to have these things done by the LBS, but you will end up with one of the very best, production line touring bicycles of all time to enjoy for a long time (well worth the investment IMO).

Cheers,

Z
Thanks Z! It would be $100 well spent. This bike is in great shape and has a great history in my family. My grandfather took it on a trip to Europe and rode it all over the UK and Ireland. I'm happy it stayed in the family...
I think I'll keep the Suntour stuff and just get it cleaned/adjusted. They seem to function fine. I'm an entry level rider, so i doubt i'll be wearing it out very soon...
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Old 03-18-09, 12:52 PM   #7
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Does the bike have a sticker on the seat tube stating "splined triple butted" of "double butted chromoly"?
That will help narrow down the year. If a road bike is what you want, a road bike this is not. it's a loaded touring bike so yes it is kind of a tank by comparison to a true road bike. I am sure there are many people on this forum who would love to trade you something a little more nimble and light for your 1000.
There are no more decals of any kind...

I actually like the idea of a touring bike now that i know the difference. I don't plan on racing through the streets of SF, just nice rides on the coast. Plus, it's an heirloom. To trade it would be tough...
Thanks for info!
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Old 03-18-09, 01:11 PM   #8
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the Mountech rear is a weak design and will likely breakdown. It has a bit of collectivity value for its notorious rep. You may want to box it up. Any modern Deore rear derailleur will be a good substitute and magnitudes more reliable. Important when you're far from home.
Very cool history to your bike. Definitely a keeper. Where ever you ride, it's like having your grandfather along.
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Old 03-18-09, 01:14 PM   #9
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so the rear is prone to fail, or both? Could i replace the rear derailleur and leave the front? The shifters are on the down tube if it matters...
I'm such a noob.
I'm just happy the bike gets a 2nd life!
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Old 03-18-09, 01:18 PM   #10
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Certainly. You can change out the either or both of the derailleurs. A good idea to do this the same time you get new cabling (if that's in the cards). Are there 5 or 6 cogs on the rear?
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Old 03-18-09, 01:23 PM   #11
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there are 6 cogs. I plan on doing the cables along with a tune up and new tires/tubes... due to money, i may just hold off on a derailleur. I don't plan on going to far from home at first...
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Old 03-18-09, 02:10 PM   #12
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Just the rear design is weak. The front can stay.

A lot of the maintenance and tuning is fundamental. Not hard and can be picked up quickly. If you have the basic tools...A few special tools makes the jobs easier, and done properly. I personally prefer to spend the money on my tools and learn how to do the mechanics.
The Park Tool website and Harris Cyclery website with Sheldon Brown's links are two of the most valuable and helpful to get you on your way.
If ball bearing overhauls and chain replacement seem too difficult, I recommend looking into bike clinics/co-ops in your area for guidance. Many of us grew up doing these things for so long it's become 2nd nature. And we can forget a newbie may have no comprehension of what's involved.

Tires, tubes, cables, and new brake pads should be within your level of aptitude. Kind of required anyway when you're alone on the road.
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Old 03-18-09, 02:27 PM   #13
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Just the rear design is weak. The front can stay.

A lot of the maintenance and tuning is fundamental. Not hard and can be picked up quickly. If you have the basic tools...A few special tools makes the jobs easier, and done properly. I personally prefer to spend the money on my tools and learn how to do the mechanics.
The Park Tool website and Harris Cyclery website with Sheldon Brown's links are two of the most valuable and helpful to get you on your way.
If ball bearing overhauls and chain replacement seem too difficult, I recommend looking into bike clinics/co-ops in your area for guidance. Many of us grew up doing these things for so long it's become 2nd nature. And we can forget a newbie may have no comprehension of what's involved.

Tires, tubes, cables, and new brake pads should be within your level of aptitude. Kind of required anyway when you're alone on the road.
Thanks for the tips. I actually have a few tools and have attempted to work on my mtb, but i do need some additional info/hands-on time... They're are a lot of bicyclists where i live so finding local knowledge shouldn't be hard.
Thank you for the links...
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Old 03-18-09, 02:42 PM   #14
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there are 6 cogs. ...
I suspect that based on the RD and the number of cogs, you don't have one of the earliest 1000's (which is a good thing). Hopefully T-Mar or someone else who can decipher the date codes can confirm this for you.
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Old 03-18-09, 03:58 PM   #15
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If your in the east bay, Missing Link in Berkeley is a great place to stop by, they can sort out what needs to be done, and they usually offer repair classes if you want to pick up the skills yourself.
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Old 03-18-09, 04:12 PM   #16
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I live on the peninsula, but Missing Link seems like what i need. The Miyata is too nice for me to learn by diving into, but i do want to get some classes on basic repair. I'm capable, i just have no experience tinkering with bikes. Every time i'd try, it ended not well, so i spread the wealth and got all my work done by a mechanic... I'm just barely getting into riding as a hobby.
Zorro, thanks for the help ID'ing the Miyata... I PM'd T-Mar...Pics soon
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Old 03-18-09, 04:35 PM   #17
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Your frame is likely built in 1982. A very good year for the Miyata 1000. The first letter of the serial number is the key- K is 1982, L is 1983, M is 1984 etc. Your bike may be a 1983 model, even though the frame was made in 1982.

The Mountech mech's are a bit puzzling, but it may have been purchased as a frameset and built by the bike shop. The front mech is fine- I wouldn't change it until the cage wears through. The rear mech just has the problem of the tension spring being inside the guide pulley, which therefore wears quickly. Plus the guide pulley can't be replaced (well, it can, really, but good luck finding a new one). But it will shift fine until it wears out, at which point you can get a Deore LX rear mech or something like that. Or just bite the bullet now, and toss the Mountech. Other than that, your bike has really high quality components and was built for tens of thousands of miles of rugged use. It's not the lightest bike, but it's comfortable to ride, built to last and very desirable even thirty years later.

Here's a link to scans of Miyata catalogs: http://www.miyatacatalogs.com/
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Old 03-18-09, 04:36 PM   #18
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The Miyata is too nice for me to learn by diving into, but i do want to get some classes on basic repair.
Better bikes are easier to fix!!! Besides...you now have us to guide you along.

As far as rear derailleurs go, Deore level Shimano are reasonable on Ebay.


I've had one of these on my mtn. bike for years....

http://cgi.ebay.com/Shimano-Deore-LX...1%7C240%3A1318

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Old 03-18-09, 05:05 PM   #19
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Your frame is likely built in 1982. A very good year for the Miyata 1000. The first letter of the serial number is the key- K is 1982, L is 1983, M is 1984 etc. Your bike may be a 1983 model, even though the frame was made in 1982.

The Mountech mech's are a bit puzzling, but it may have been purchased as a frameset and built by the bike shop. The front mech is fine- I wouldn't change it until the cage wears through. The rear mech just has the problem of the tension spring being inside the guide pulley, which therefore wears quickly. Plus the guide pulley can't be replaced (well, it can, really, but good luck finding a new one). But it will shift fine until it wears out, at which point you can get a Deore LX rear mech or something like that. Or just bite the bullet now, and toss the Mountech. Other than that, your bike has really high quality components and was built for tens of thousands of miles of rugged use. It's not the lightest bike, but it's comfortable to ride, built to last and very desirable even thirty years later.

Here's a link to scans of Miyata catalogs: http://www.miyatacatalogs.com/
Yes. The 1982 looks to be the one. Thanks for the catalog link! I will probably be cheap and keep the old mech for a bit. Plus it'll give me a maintenance job to work up to...

Quote:
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Better bikes are easier to fix!!! Besides...you now have us to guide you along....
I see what you mean. Good hardware to work with. I'm just afraid of breaking something. Good to hear it's a rugged bike... I will definitely be taking advantage of all the knowledge on this board...
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Old 03-18-09, 06:15 PM   #20
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congrats on a great bike. I found mine in a field(covered and hadn't been there long) and paid a buck for it, never regreted the money... Even though its a bit smaller than I generaly like it has carried me over a lot of miles. Just a longer stem and seatpost. it has handled full panniers at 54 mph downhill with no twitch. Mine has original wheels, hubs, and BB, but had to change to a new freewheel when the original left me stranded a few miles from home. So preventitave things like a new rear derailer now could save some hassle later.

Even though its not a "road bike", it should be a comfortable one and fairly quick. Well worth the money to get tools to work on it yourself.

I always suggest that a person inexperienced in bike repair go to the library and get some books on bike maintainance. even if it is not exactly showing what you have it is a good way to get familiar with things. Try going to a used book store and see if you can score a bike repair book on the cheap. the internets can tell you how to do something, but a book can lay on the floor right next to a dissasembled part.

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Old 03-18-09, 07:26 PM   #21
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Nice get.

Wish I had a 1000
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Old 03-18-09, 07:36 PM   #22
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Excellent inheritance. Big following for that bike, parts are plentiful, and advice is more than so.
Clean, lube, and adjust, then see if anything's wrong. My guess is probably not, and it would be a while before you need to worry about repairs.
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Old 03-18-09, 07:48 PM   #23
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Let there be pics!

So i took a few shots. These will be the 'before' shots.
Note i haven't even began to clean, lube or do anything. I can't wait to see her cleaned up!



I have a gallery of the bike up on Flickr

It looks like this weekend I'll be investing in a few tools, some tri-flow and a good how-to book...
I can't wait!
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Old 03-18-09, 08:58 PM   #24
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sweet bike!
who's Shores?
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Old 03-18-09, 09:24 PM   #25
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Thanks Doug!
Gene Shores was my grandfather. In the 80's he did a lot of tours up and down the west coast... He loved that bike... I hope to bring it back to life.
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