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  1. #1
    Don't be a "Drew" Muttleyone's Avatar
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    Bicycle Fit Question

    Hey guys I thought I'd throw this out to you guys. After riding my bike for about an hour the bottom of my right foot starts to tingle and then as more time goes by it starts to move up my foot. The left foot will start shortly after the right foot. My bike is 58cm c-t-c, I'm 6'3" with a 34" inseam so I'm short on legs, long on torso, a Rolls seat and SPD pedals. The shoes were my first thought but seem to be a good fit and are not too tight. So I know something is not set up correctly on my bike. I thought you guys could throw out some ideas on which would be best to try first to tweek my bike into a better fit.

    Thanks
    Mutt
    I love all my bikes because I have a heart of steel.

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  2. #2
    Makeshift kbjack's Avatar
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    Pure guess, but it could be saddle position. Does the nose of the saddle put pressure 'up front'? If so, try moving the saddle slightly forward and angling it parallel to the ground or slightly downward.

    Work on keeping your seated pressure centered on your sit bones rather than the ol' taint.

    I also find that some of these numbness/tingling effects go away as the season progresses and my fitness level goes up.

  3. #3
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    I'm guessing your shoes are too small or too tight. I don't like clipless pedals for a zillion reasons, but their basic design flaw is that they focus all of the stress of pedaling on a very small portion of your foot. A large BMX style pedal spreads the pressure out over an area that is about 400% larger.

    Also, chosing easier gears and a faster cadence will reduce pressure on your feet. Lots of guys will pump along at about 90 gear inches and complain their feet hurt. Moving to 70 gear inches and spinning faster will produce the same speed with less stress on your feet.

  4. #4
    Senior Member cycleheimer's Avatar
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    I am having that problem right now with my Trek. In my case, I am riding with toes clips. I will remove the toe clips for a better position on the peddle before riding again. Given your size, shouldn't you actually be riding a 62CM frame?

  5. #5
    slow as I ever was Ex Pres's Avatar
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    I've never had a foot "hot spot" so I don't know exactly how to describe it, but it does afflict some people, particularly on small pedal surfaces. I use SLs, so spread out a little more than the SPDs. Would you describe what you're having as a "hot spot"? Does it start right at the pedal?

  6. #6
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    I have good luck with old school road quill pedals, toeclips, and cycling shoes with steel shaned rubber soles. I tighten the straps to, but never past, the point at which I can easily yank a foot back and out.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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  7. #7
    Don't be a "Drew" Muttleyone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycleheimer View Post
    Given your size, shouldn't you actually be riding a 62CM frame?
    You would think so but I'm short on legs and long in torso.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Barker View Post
    I've never had a foot "hot spot" so I don't know exactly how to describe it, but it does afflict some people, particularly on small pedal surfaces. I use SLs, so spread out a little more than the SPDs. Would you describe what you're having as a "hot spot"? Does it start right at the pedal?
    Maybe that's what it is. It starts around the ball on the bottom of my foot and spreads out from there and given enough time will start to go up my foot and above my ankle. I'm going to try the saddle adjustment tommorow and see if that helps, then I'll go from there.

    Thanks for the input,
    Mutt
    I love all my bikes because I have a heart of steel.

    '91/'92 Tommasini Velocista
    '88 Paramount Wheaties/Schwinn team bike
    '85 Paramount "wife's"
    '81 Miyata 1000
    '90 Miyata TripleCross
    '87 Centurion Ironman (Miami Vice)
    '73 Dawes Galaxy turned Scorcher

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    Quote Originally Posted by Muttleyone View Post
    You would think so but I'm short on legs and long in torso.
    Now, I like classic & vintage, but if anyone could benefit from a newer bike it's probabaly you, though I don't know how it would impact your foot issue.

  9. #9
    Senior Member javal's Avatar
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    I agree with rustyoldbikes; the SPD/mtb-pedal doesnt spread the pressure allthough SPD-shoes usually have sturdier construction. If you like your pedals and shoes you must "exercise" your foot more frequently on longer rides. Move your toes, clip out and dingle with your leg and so on.

    Bicycle fit is a whole other question; lots of ideas in this forum and even more within professional biking. The most common fault when it comes to amateurs/leisure riding is a too upright position (people tend to wanne stretch their legs) - but then again, if not competing why bend over too much?
    the rider makes the bike - steel club member 198

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