Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Rust Hole

  1. #1
    BMW Aficionado David325's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Boston, MA
    My Bikes
    '66 Raleigh RSW, '69 Humber Sports, '71 Raleigh Pro, '73 Raleigh Super Course, '74 Raleigh International, '75 + '77 Raleigh Competition, '87 Raleigh Edge, others
    Posts
    204
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Rust Hole

    I was looking over my bike when I found a rust spot on the inside of the chainstay with a hole in the middle of it about 1-2mm in diameter. Is this dangerous/possible to fix?

  2. #2
    Senior Member vincev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Crown Point,Indiana
    Posts
    620
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would edge towards dangerous.
    [IMG][SIGPIC][SIGPIC]http://i263.photobucket.com/albums/ii125/vincev_2008/idiotpic.jpg?t=1226942548[/SIGPIC[SIGPIC]][/[/SIGPIC]SIGPIC][/IMG]

  3. #3
    MFA jjvw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Denver
    My Bikes
    1973 Italvega Nouvo Record; '04 Felt F80 :1977 Motobecane Super Mirage : 1965 Hercules
    Posts
    1,182
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That looks more like the rear wheel was (often) not installed properly and rubbed a hole through the chain stay. Am I correct that this is on the non-drive side?
    <---------------------------------------------------------------------I once caught a signature THIS BIG--------------------------------------------------------------------->

  4. #4
    soonerbills soonerbills's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Okieland
    My Bikes
    25 at last count. One day I'll make a list
    Posts
    935
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A good welder can fix that hole. Shouldn't take more than a minute to repair but it will require a repaint!

  5. #5
    BMW Aficionado David325's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Boston, MA
    My Bikes
    '66 Raleigh RSW, '69 Humber Sports, '71 Raleigh Pro, '73 Raleigh Super Course, '74 Raleigh International, '75 + '77 Raleigh Competition, '87 Raleigh Edge, others
    Posts
    204
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yep, it's non-drive side. How much would it cost for a welder to fix it? I was thinking of doing a repaint sometime anyways.

  6. #6
    Stop reading my posts! unworthy1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    8,386
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    if you go to a bicycle professional (a frame builder) he might use silver solder or brass and braze it, or he might use TiG welding to fill it in. This could cost something like $60 (maybe more) but would be done carefully and with low heat. OR you could take it to anybody with a MiG welder (point & shoot) like a shade-tree mechanic or a muffler shop worker on lunch break, and for anything from a 6-pack of beer to $20 bill, get him to shoot a gob of MiG wire weld into it. That might be messier, but you'd get to file it down (and you wanted new paint anyway).

  7. #7
    Senior Member SingeDebile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    593
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by unworthy1 View Post
    if you go to a bicycle professional (a frame builder) he might use silver solder or brass and braze it, or he might use TiG welding to fill it in. This could cost something like $60 (maybe more) but would be done carefully and with low heat. OR you could take it to anybody with a MiG welder (point & shoot) like a shade-tree mechanic or a muffler shop worker on lunch break, and for anything from a 6-pack of beer to $20 bill, get him to shoot a gob of MiG wire weld into it. That might be messier, but you'd get to file it down (and you wanted new paint anyway).

    +1 for this direction, though they would probably simply braze a 'patch' to cover it making it almost as good as new strength wise. I would atleast get a quote from a local builder before I thought of having it mig welded.
    bike bike
    ,/(looking for high end steel frames in the larger then life sizes of 68-70cm)
    69cm Romic 'Sport Tourer/Porteur'

  8. #8
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Appleton WI
    My Bikes
    Several, mostly not name brands.
    Posts
    13,112
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by soonerbills View Post
    A good welder can fix that hole. Shouldn't take more than a minute to repair but it will require a repaint!
    I would silver solder a patch over the hole rather than weld. Less heat damage to the already compromised tubing.

    I can't tell where you are, but if you're near northeastern Wisconsin I could do it for you.

  9. #9
    Novist senior member tolfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Amish Country
    My Bikes
    have about 30 bikes right now
    Posts
    1,514
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How long have you had the bike?
    How do people ride with the tire rubing and not notice?
    There are some things a man needs to believe in wether they're true or not;

  10. #10
    BMW Aficionado David325's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Boston, MA
    My Bikes
    '66 Raleigh RSW, '69 Humber Sports, '71 Raleigh Pro, '73 Raleigh Super Course, '74 Raleigh International, '75 + '77 Raleigh Competition, '87 Raleigh Edge, others
    Posts
    204
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SingeDebile View Post
    +1 for this direction, though they would probably simply braze a 'patch' to cover it making it almost as good as new strength wise. I would atleast get a quote from a local builder before I thought of having it mig welded.
    That sounds good.

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
    I would silver solder a patch over the hole rather than weld. Less heat damage to the already compromised tubing.

    I can't tell where you are, but if you're near northeastern Wisconsin I could do it for you.
    Nah, I'm in CT, but thanks for the offer.
    Quote Originally Posted by tolfan View Post
    How long have you had the bike?
    How do people ride with the tire rubing and not notice?
    I've had it.. 2 weeks, I think. I wasn't the one riding with it rubbing, and just noticed the spot now.

    By "silver solder," do you guys mean like the stuff you buy at radioshack?.. Doubt that's what you mean, but I do that kind of soldering all the time with electronics.. is it the same thing?

  11. #11
    Stop reading my posts! unworthy1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    8,386
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    no it's called "solder" but that's a misnomer, it's actually brazing but not with brass or bronze alloy, rather with an alloy that has *some* silver content. If you haven't done brazing before, let an expert have at it.

  12. #12
    BMW Aficionado David325's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Boston, MA
    My Bikes
    '66 Raleigh RSW, '69 Humber Sports, '71 Raleigh Pro, '73 Raleigh Super Course, '74 Raleigh International, '75 + '77 Raleigh Competition, '87 Raleigh Edge, others
    Posts
    204
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Got it. Thanks guys!

  13. #13
    soonerbills soonerbills's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Okieland
    My Bikes
    25 at last count. One day I'll make a list
    Posts
    935
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would silver solder a patch over the hole rather than weld. Less heat damage to the already compromised tubing.

    While I won't argue the value of silver solder techniques, I will add that experienced welders using low amperage and flux core wire will generally perform a better repair. By reducing heat transfer to the surrounding material due to less actual operation time and the fact that the hole is actually repaired the area will be as strong or stronger the before the damage occurred .
    Yes there are hacks that will just spin a roll of wire to cover their lack of skill but in the hands of a talented welder a quality repair can be achieved. Brazing, soldering and other such techniques have their place for sure but IMHO not in the repair of a structural member such as a chain stay.
    Last edited by soonerbills; 06-20-09 at 10:09 PM.

  14. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    My Bikes
    '86 Specialized Sirrus
    Posts
    19
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think a *good* welder would be able to properly fix it for less money. If this is a collectible bike or has strong sentimental value, I'd at least get a quote from a frame builder. I don't know too much about high-end frame repair, but I do know a few welders that would be able to patch that hole in less than 15 min (not including finishing) as long as it's just plain steel.

  15. #15
    BMW Aficionado David325's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Boston, MA
    My Bikes
    '66 Raleigh RSW, '69 Humber Sports, '71 Raleigh Pro, '73 Raleigh Super Course, '74 Raleigh International, '75 + '77 Raleigh Competition, '87 Raleigh Edge, others
    Posts
    204
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, I emailed a frame builder for a quote.. if that'll cost too much, I'll track down a good welder. Thanks for the advice all.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Oldpeddaller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Maidstone, Kent, England
    My Bikes
    1970 Holdsworth Mistral, Vitus 979, Colnago Primavera, Corratec Hydracarbon, Massi MegaTeam, 1935 Claud Butler Super Velo, Carrera Virtuoso, Viner, 1953 Claud Butler Silver Jubilee, 1954 Holdsworth Typhoon, 1966 Claud Butler Olympic Road, 1982 Claud
    Posts
    2,499
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
    I would silver solder a patch over the hole rather than weld. Less heat damage to the already compromised tubing.

    I can't tell where you are, but if you're near northeastern Wisconsin I could do it for you.
    +1. A patch on the outside of metal shaped to fit around the tube - or if you're really keen, do what I did in a similar situation. Make a shaped patch to fit inside the tube. Drill two small holes in the middle of the patch and pass a length of fuse wire or florist's thin wire through it. Hold the free ends of the wire and pass the patch through the hole into the tube. Pull on the wire to position the patch in place and tension and tie the wire around the opposite stay to hold it in place. Use a small Butane/Propane canister torch if you don't have access to a bottled gas set-up and use silver 'brazing' rod with flux to run a seam around the edges of the hole and the exposed patch. Use the same method to build on top of the patch to fill it. Let it cool and file/sand it to match the rest of the stay. Total cost 16 Sterling (about $25 US I guess) You will char the paint in the area of the repair but may be able to prime it and then blow it in with a matching aerosol - although I found it easier to strip and spray the whole frame. The repair will be as good as new. In future, make sure your wheel is secured!

    Good luck!
    Oldpeddaller - The older I get, the better I used to be !!!" ***** If at first you don't succeed - hit it with a hammer.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  17. #17
    BMW Aficionado David325's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Boston, MA
    My Bikes
    '66 Raleigh RSW, '69 Humber Sports, '71 Raleigh Pro, '73 Raleigh Super Course, '74 Raleigh International, '75 + '77 Raleigh Competition, '87 Raleigh Edge, others
    Posts
    204
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That sounds doable... I assume I'd make the patch out of steel? What thickness did you use, and where'd you get it?

  18. #18
    Senior Member Oldpeddaller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Maidstone, Kent, England
    My Bikes
    1970 Holdsworth Mistral, Vitus 979, Colnago Primavera, Corratec Hydracarbon, Massi MegaTeam, 1935 Claud Butler Super Velo, Carrera Virtuoso, Viner, 1953 Claud Butler Silver Jubilee, 1954 Holdsworth Typhoon, 1966 Claud Butler Olympic Road, 1982 Claud
    Posts
    2,499
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by David325 View Post
    That sounds doable... I assume I'd make the patch out of steel? What thickness did you use, and where'd you get it?
    Just a small piece of thin steel I had lying around on the bench - originally a mounting plate for the igniter on our old gas fire! (Nothing goes to waste in my workshop, but it's often hard to move around! It was about 1mm thick so fairly easy to bend it around a solid jack handle to get the right curve, then cut and grind to an oval shape that would "post" through the hole in my stay. I drilled the small holes after shaping it to make sure they were in the part that was exposed when in position. After tacking the edges I unwound and removed the wire before filling the centre. The finished repair doesn't show and hasn't cracked at all. This way you can monitor that - with a patch on top it would be hard to check.

    Good Luck!
    Oldpeddaller - The older I get, the better I used to be !!!" ***** If at first you don't succeed - hit it with a hammer.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •