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Thread: 70s Peugeot

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    70s Peugeot

    Hey all-

    I'm thinking about picking up this 70s Peugeot, but I've heard that some of the french bikes from that era are of low quality and aren't really worth putting a lot of work into. Just wondering if this particular bike would be worth picking up. I'd to get a good bike for a good price that I can eventually put a lot into.

    http://chicago.craigslist.org/chc/bik/1240744092.html

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    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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    That's a OU8. It's the second from the bottom, but I would not call it low quality. I wouldn't put a lot into it either, but some have. The price would be a bargain in my area, if it's in decent shape.

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    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    Low end bike, but priced appropriately. Is this what you are looking for? Myself, I step up to the 1980s Japanese bikes. Will cost you a little more, but there are a lot of good ones: better wheels, better components, better frames, standard threading.

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    Honestly I'd like to get a Peugeot, and it seems like a good price, but the ad also says that it needs new brakes and wheels, which could easily run me close to 200, if I'm being conservative. Just wondering if this deal is worth it. Do Peugeots use 700c wheels, and would it be an easy conversion to single speed?

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    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    That looks like a 1974 UO-8, based on the decals and the stem shifters.

    It probaby does not need new brakes, just new pads and cables, which are very affordable.

    Although the original wheelset is 27", you can easily convert to 700C.

    It would be a very easy SS conversion, but I don't see any benefit whatsoever in doing that, because I like gears and have nothing but contempt for freewheeling SS conversions, which simply dumb down the bike and compromise its versatility and utility. (A true fixed gear is something different, but just not my thing.)

    My recommendation: look for a decent used 700C wheelset with a 6-speed or 7-speed freewheel, spread the rear triangle, install new brake cables and KoolStop pads, and consider replacing those wretched stem shifters with barcons. I commute on a 1970 UO-8 with aluminum rims and cranks and Japanese deraillerus, and it ain't bad at all.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    You are better off just buying a bike that has already been converted. Unless you have a workshop full of parts, its cheaper to just find what you are looking for.

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    PanGalacticGargleBlaster Zaphod Beeblebrox's Avatar
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    I think it would make a bad single speed conversion candidate (even though I happen to like freewheeling single speeds) because of the cottered cranks. To convert this you'd want a new crankset, which would necessitate a new bottom bracket..plus wheels etc..

    for 100, if it were me, i'd just clean it up and ride it. I'd be willing to bet it doesn't actually need new brakes, but just new brake pads. around 10 bux a set. And some new shifter and brake cables never hurt and are under 20 bux for all 4 cables.

    You can get a set of cheap replacement wheels at Niagara Cycle for under 100 bux that will be much better than whats on there....you could use 700c or 27" either will fit and the brakes should reach fine for 700c.
    --Don't Panic.

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    Senior Member miamijim's Avatar
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    Tires, maybe cables, right lever is messed up, doesnt shift gears.....for $100?

    I'd think you better off waiting for something good to go right out of the box.
    WWW.CYCLESPEUGEOT.COM 2005 Pinarello Dogma; 1991 Paramount PDG 70 Mtb; 1976? AD Vent Noir; 1989 LeMond Maillot Juane F&F; 1993? Basso GAP F&F; 1989 Terry Symmetry; 2003 Trek 4700 Mtb; 1983 Vitus 979

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    Quote Originally Posted by John E View Post
    ..

    Although the original wheelset is 27", you can easily convert to 700C.

    It would be a very easy SS conversion, but I don't see any benefit whatsoever in doing that, because I like gears and have nothing but contempt for freewheeling SS conversions, which simply dumb down the bike and compromise its versatility and utility. (A true fixed gear is something different, but just not my thing.)

    My recommendation: look for a decent used 700C wheelset with a 6-speed or 7-speed freewheel, spread the rear triangle, install new brake cables and KoolStop pads, and consider replacing those wretched stem shifters with barcons. I commute on a 1970 UO-8 with aluminum rims and cranks and Japanese deraillerus, and it ain't bad at all.
    I gotta disagree in that all this is "easy." To convert from 27" wheels, to 700c, you'd have to find long-reach brakes. A SS conversion could be as easy as taking the derailleurs off, and shortening the chain, or more involved like replacing the freewheel. Either way, all of these additional modifications will cost money, and you'll end up spending at least another $60-100.

    Also, I'd say $100 is probably a fair price for a UO-8 in Chicago, and if you wait, you probably find one in better condition.

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    Senior Member miamijim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by notfrench View Post
    I gotta disagree in that all this is "easy." To convert from 27" wheels, to 700c, you'd have to find long-reach brakes. A SS conversion could be as easy as taking the derailleurs off, and shortening the chain, or more involved like replacing the freewheel. Either way, all of these additional modifications will cost money, and you'll end up spending at least another $60-100.

    Also, I'd say $100 is probably a fair price for a UO-8 in Chicago, and if you wait, you probably find one in better condition.
    Converting is easy. Going from 27's to 700's only calls for 4mm of extra brake reach. Existing calips may be able to accomidate that. As far as gears go that's easy as well, it's eitherfew bucks for spacer if you have a cassette hub or $12 for a BMX freewheeling if you starting with a thread-on freewheeling. Add $7 or so for BMX chainring bolts and that's it.

    Of course this assuming your doing all your own work.
    WWW.CYCLESPEUGEOT.COM 2005 Pinarello Dogma; 1991 Paramount PDG 70 Mtb; 1976? AD Vent Noir; 1989 LeMond Maillot Juane F&F; 1993? Basso GAP F&F; 1989 Terry Symmetry; 2003 Trek 4700 Mtb; 1983 Vitus 979

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    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    The UO8 can take 700c rims without replacing brake calipers!

    I would wait to replace the crankset and pedals. Replace the wheels and tires first.

    Some UO8's came with decent pedals which accept toe clips. They are durable, too.

    Why does the seller think it needs new brakes? Chances are, replacing the cables and housings will make the brakes work again. Oh, you may need new brake shoes. Get the Kool Stop brake shoes. Mafac Racer brakes are hard to adjust but otherwise excellent brakes. It's a shame they're not made any more.
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    Senior Member sunburst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by notfrench View Post
    To convert from 27" wheels, to 700c, you'd have to find long-reach brakes.

    Also, I'd say $100 is probably a fair price for a UO-8 in Chicago, and if you wait, you probably find one in better condition.
    I've converted a couple of Peugeots to 700c wheels with no problem. The Mafac Racer brakes already are long (enough) reach for 700c. You only have to loosen and slide the pads down.

    I think the seller should have taken the bike to SF. He could sell it in a few hours for more. I saw a number of $300 Peugeots in the sfbay cl last weekend.

    Also, having fixed up and/or converted (one fixie, one ss) five mid-70's Peugeots, I think they're worth it. And I picked up a sixth one yesterday. Everyone says parts are hard to get, and I can't argue, but after rebuilding multiple headsets, bottom brackets, and hubs (this weekend), I found I didn't needed to replace these old parts. I've got a busted pulley on one rd, but that seems solvable.

    Old Peugeots are kind of cool, and I like the way they ride.
    I do agree, however, that an 70/80s Japanese bike would be a great way to go.

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    I stand corrected on the brakes issue. Personally, I've had some trouble with my existing brakes (not stock), so I just left the wheels at 27". I'll dig through the parts bin next time, though, and look for some Mafacs (or anything else you guys would recommend).

    sunburst--when you're rebuilding, are you leaving the cranks as cottered? I'm having trouble finding 118mm spindles.

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    So I picked up the same bike today, but not from the guy on Craig'slist. I found the exact same bike at Working Bikes for the same price, and it was in amazing shape, had just been tuned up, etc. I'm looking to upgrade the wheels and convert it to single speed. Would these wheels work for these purposes?
    http://cgi.ebay.com/WHITE-WEINMANN-D...ayphotohosting

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    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    Yes, those wheels will work, with caveats.

    One is that the spacing of the rear hub is available in 126 and 130 mm. Your frame has 120 mm spacing. You have to spread the rear apart to accomodate the wider wheels. It's not rocket science, as Sheldon Brown said, but it's not for the faint of heart, either.

    Second is that it will give you an unknown chainline. What crankset do you plan to put on the bike?

    Not that there's anything wrong with it, but what appeals to you in single speed?
    You don't read my signature anyway, do you?

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    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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    A cotterd crank can work very well for SS/FG. It's certainly easier and cheaper than converting to a cotterlees crank and some of us think that cottered cranks are cool. You can always make do with what you have for now and convert later.


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    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    Dirtdrop is right. Take a look at that. It's not that much heavier, and it's so much easier and cheaper.
    You don't read my signature anyway, do you?

    Tom Reingold, noglider@pobox.com
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    Senior Member Iowegian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtdrop View Post
    some of us think that cottered cranks are cool.

    Everytime I see that picture I want to go buy a cotter press...

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    Senior Member sunburst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by notfrench View Post
    sunburst--when you're rebuilding, are you leaving the cranks as cottered? I'm having trouble finding 118mm spindles.
    Yes, I'm leaving the cottered cranks. With the ss, I did the same as dirtdrop's photo above, removed the inner chainring, even though with the 52 up front I need a huge rear cog to create a usable gear.

    I overhauled the bb on two of them, and didn't need to replace the spindles. With my bearing surfaces: hubs, headset and bb races, I felt there was a lot of wear, but still, repacking with new bearings made a big improvement.

    Are your spindles worn out, or do you need 118mm for fixie or ss conversions?

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    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iowegian View Post
    Everytime I see that picture I want to go buy a cotter press...
    Heh heh! I don't own one. All you need is a hammer, a punch, and a lot of aggression. Of course, you need a support for the axle while aggressing.

    I would use the 42-tooth (or 40-tooth) chainring, not the 52. Smaller cogs are easier to get. But it hardly matters.
    You don't read my signature anyway, do you?

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    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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    Bigger cogs are easy to find (EAI) and big gears are more efficient. 52X22 works for me.

    My cottered crank looks the way it does because nobody has ever beat it with a hammer.

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    Senior Member miamijim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noglider View Post
    All you need is a hammer, a punch, and a lot of aggression. Of course, you need a support for the axle while aggressing.
    The end result may be 8 stiches in your palm.......
    WWW.CYCLESPEUGEOT.COM 2005 Pinarello Dogma; 1991 Paramount PDG 70 Mtb; 1976? AD Vent Noir; 1989 LeMond Maillot Juane F&F; 1993? Basso GAP F&F; 1989 Terry Symmetry; 2003 Trek 4700 Mtb; 1983 Vitus 979

  23. #23
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    Do I have to state explicitly that when you use a hammer, you have to use it properly?
    You don't read my signature anyway, do you?

    Tom Reingold, noglider@pobox.com
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    Senior Member sunburst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noglider View Post

    I would use the 42-tooth (or 40-tooth) chainring, not the 52. Smaller cogs are easier to get. But it hardly matters.
    With that crank design, you can't use the 42-tooth. It's bolted to the bigger one.
    My chainline worked out fine because I had a freehub rear wheel, and a bunch of spacers (forte conversion kit).

    Dirtdrop,
    where can I find a 22 tooth cog (don't know what EAI means)? I've searched without success. I'm running 52/20, which works, but I'd prefer a 22 for longer rides, especially with this bay area wind.

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