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Old 07-01-09, 02:14 PM   #1
noglider 
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Restoring a girls' Schwinn Hollywood in Noo Joizy

This is such a beauty. I got it at a police auction a couple of years ago and haven't worked on it until now. I think I'm done. My daughters are 20 and 17, so they're much too old for it, so I'll sell it. It's been such a pleasure to have, just to look at it.

Do you folks have any advice? I'd like to know if there are things I can do to further improve the appearance. As you can see, there is rust, and there are lots of nicks in the paint. It looked much worse when it came in.

Also, how much do you think I should ask for? I'm thinking maybe $70.

I had to overhaul the coaster brake hub. The grease had turned to glue, so the brake didn't work at all. I cleaned and oiled the chain. I trued the wheels, too. Plus I did a ton of scrubbing and scraping and washing. I replaced the headset locknut. I am mentoring an 18 year old fellow in bike repair, so we overhauled the bottom bracket for the purpose of teaching. It turned out not to have needed it, but it's done now. What a well built crankset this is! There's nothing like it made any more. Ah, Schwinn!

Pictures to follow...
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Old 07-01-09, 02:15 PM   #2
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Old 07-02-09, 12:03 PM   #3
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Bump.
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Old 07-03-09, 04:09 PM   #4
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Well, you have a beautiful classic bike there. The problem in selling it is to find someone who can appreciate a super well made USA bike. In my area, (CT), there are tons of kids bikes of this size on Craigslist for $20 to $70. As I am sure you know, the cheaper the bike, the prettier these department store junkers look (check back and see the faded paint job in 1 year). If you find the right person, I am sure that you can sell it for that price. Taking this bike apart, cleaning it and putting it back together, makes you appreciate how well made these bikes were and how a little effort will restore it quickly.
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Old 07-03-09, 04:17 PM   #5
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When I took my Hollywood apart, I was amazed at how easy it was. They're great bikes, and I've ridden mine up to 30 miles a day

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Old 07-04-09, 11:19 AM   #6
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Thanks for the support, jacksbike. I'm not in a hurry, so I can make the time/money tradeoff in favor of money. Given enough time, I can get $60 or $70. If they made a bike like this today, it would cost $300 or more.

kevinsubaru, what size tires does your Hollywood have on it? The Collegiate I'm working on has a Schwinn-specific size of 26x1-3/8 tire. I can get replacements from Harris Cyclery, thank goodness.
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Old 07-04-09, 12:26 PM   #7
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Try some Kit brand scratch remover on the paint. Makes it shiny.
You might show this to the folks over at RatRodbikes.com. They dig this kind of stuff.
$70 sounds decent. You've probably got more hours in it than it's worth on the open market. Girls bikes are just that way. People would rather buy some ugly thing from a dept. store that'll be dead in a year than something like that that will still be ridable when the archeologists dig us up.
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Old 07-04-09, 02:53 PM   #8
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47-571 or more commonly known as 26 x 1-3/4. They are Schwinn specific...S7 rims I think?
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Old 07-05-09, 06:07 AM   #9
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Yes, Schwinn used their own specific size tires. I am sure that it is a 26 X 1 3/4 S7. It seems it is harder and harder to find Schwinn size tires. I went through this recently, but found some at Niagra Cycle of Buffalo NY-n.b. needed 26 X 1 3/8 for a 3 speed. The problem is that people do not appreciate the quality and longevity of these absolutely bombproof Schwinns. I am biased, because my Dad sold Schwinn bikes for 25 years. Looking back, I find it funny to think that we could order every single replacement part for just about every Schwinn bike ever made. I remember that we ordered the small screws that held the Schwinn steel headbadge onto the front of the bike. Think about that when you have a cheapo decal today on the bike.
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Old 07-05-09, 01:04 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacksbike View Post
Yes, Schwinn used their own specific size tires. I am sure that it is a 26 X 1 3/4 S7. It seems it is harder and harder to find Schwinn size tires. I went through this recently, but found some at Niagra Cycle of Buffalo NY-n.b. needed 26 X 1 3/8 for a 3 speed. The problem is that people do not appreciate the quality and longevity of these absolutely bombproof Schwinns. I am biased, because my Dad sold Schwinn bikes for 25 years. Looking back, I find it funny to think that we could order every single replacement part for just about every Schwinn bike ever made. I remember that we ordered the small screws that held the Schwinn steel headbadge onto the front of the bike. Think about that when you have a cheapo decal today on the bike.
You can still get those screws at my local Schwinn shop.
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Old 07-06-09, 09:13 AM   #11
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I found this 26" ladies Hollywood in a dumpster and gave it the once over. Zero dollars but several hours invested. The interest on Chicagoland CL was high, and it sold quickly for my asking price of $60.






More closer to your present ride is this convertable Bantam that was found on the curb on trash day. You can see the top tube for making it a "boys" bike laying on the ground. This bike came with a chintzy non Schwinn front wheel on it. When I later found these newer aluminum Schwinn BMX wheels with red hubs and like new knobbies on the curb, I knew what I had to do!

Interest on CL wasn't as high as it was for the adult bike above, but it still sold quickly for my asking price of $45 to the first guy that showed up. What can I say, I like to under price the competition and deliver a clean, ready to roll bike.




Last edited by AlmostTrick; 07-07-09 at 08:04 AM. Reason: Added photo with top tube in place.
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Old 07-06-09, 03:20 PM   #12
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These are pretty bomb-proof. They're very basic and reliable. Getting direct replacement parts for the old Schwinns today can be difficult (28 tpi vs 24 tpi). But many of the smaller parts that go missing can be easily substituted for hardware store parts (little screws and nuts, small fasteners etc).

The 1 3/4 tire width was considered a "middle weight" size-- the balloon tire heavyweights weighed considerably more than these. The Hollywood was a pretty standard model-- common and serviceable. Given the labor and materials costs in US industry now, these bicycles would be very expensive if produced new today (which is why they aren't). The boys ones command significantly more than their girls counterparts (teenage boys BEAT on this stuff). The bikes were built to be a counterpart to the cars and motocycles of their eras, and their build reflects that-- heavy duty. I have to admit the boys paint schemes back in the day were pretty slick. I don't care for the girly pink and white combo they used on some of them. I think if you are patient you'll sell that bike.
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Old 08-05-09, 09:12 PM   #13
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I added some pom-pom streamers, in pink and white, to the handlebars. I put it on craigslist, and I'm asking for $100. I realize that's high, and I'll bring it down until it sells.

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