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  1. #1
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    What's the difference between "uniglide" and "ultra" cogs?

    Looking to replace an early 80's regina extra freewheel. Will a Shimano Dura-Ace "uniglide" cog from the late 80's work? I want to use it with a NOS Regina Everest chain and a Campy SR derailleur from the mid 80's.

    Also what does "ultra" mean?

  2. #2
    Bottecchia fan
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    Uniglide cogs have twists in the teeth to help it pick up the chain. They shift very crisply. I've never heard of Ultra cogs. The Uniglide should work great.
    1959 Bottecchia Professional (frame), 1966 Bottecchia Professional, 1971 Bottecchia Professional (frame),
    1973 Bottecchia Gran Turismo, 1974 Bottecchia Special, 1977 Bottecchia Special (frame),
    1974 Peugeot UO-8, 1988 Panasonic PT-3500, 2002 Bianchi Veloce, 2004 Bianchi Pista

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kommisar89 View Post
    Uniglide cogs have twists in the teeth to help it pick up the chain. They shift very crisply. I've never heard of Ultra cogs. The Uniglide should work great.

    Oh shoot I forgot to mention that the uniglide freewheel I have available is a 7 speed, not a six like my current Regina. Is that going to cause problems with my chain and/or derailleur?

  4. #4
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    Probably not if your frame spacing 126mm but I'm not that familiar with the Regina Everest chain. If it's a narrow chain you should be fine. If it a wider 5-speed or standard 6-speed chain then that would be a problem. The derailleur should be ok.
    1959 Bottecchia Professional (frame), 1966 Bottecchia Professional, 1971 Bottecchia Professional (frame),
    1973 Bottecchia Gran Turismo, 1974 Bottecchia Special, 1977 Bottecchia Special (frame),
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  5. #5
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    Maybe he means Ultegra, as opposed to Ultra?

  6. #6
    French threaded PDXaero's Avatar
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    An "ultra" freewheel is narrowly spaced freewheel made by a few companies in the 80s. For example an ultra 6 is the width of a standard 5 speed freewheel and an ultra 7 is the width of a standard 6 speed freewheel.

    Also to the OP
    Be sure to have cogs and freewheels in their own category as they are not interchangeable.
    If you want to replace your freewheel with a individual cogs you will need a new hub or a rebuildable freewheel.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by PDXaero View Post
    An "ultra" freewheel is narrowly spaced freewheel made by a few companies in the 80s. For example an ultra 6 is the width of a standard 5 speed freewheel and an ultra 7 is the width of a standard 6 speed freewheel.

    Also to the OP
    Be sure to have cogs and freewheels in their own category as they are not interchangeable.
    If you want to replace your freewheel with a individual cogs you will need a new hub or a rebuildable freewheel.
    I understand now. I am looking to replace a freewhell, not a hub with a cassette.

    I just want to know if I can swap out a six speed Regina Extra freewheel for a Dura Ace 7400 seven speed freewheel. I have been looking at NOS regina six speed freewheels on Ebay but they are all the same corn cob ratio I have now. What I want to do is find a freewheel I can use that is maybe 13-26 instead of the 13-20 I have now. All the Regina/Sachs ones I see for sale are the same close gear ratio. The wider range freewheels all seem to be Shimano uniglide and I'm still not sure if that will work with my Campy SR derailleur and a Regina chain.

  8. #8
    Old Skeptic stronglight's Avatar
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    Shimano made "Wide" UG (Uniglide) for 5 and 6 speeds, and also "Narrow" UG for mid 1980s 6 & 7 speeds.

    In the late 1970s Suntour introduced their "Ultra-6" freewheels which would fit a 6 cogs into 120 mm. spacing, and shortly after that they made the "Ultra-7" to fit within standard 126 mm. 6-speed spacing.

    But, the problem is not at all so simple as the width of the spacing between the cogs... although that too would be an issue since most older freewheel cogs used flanges at their base for spacing them between each other (and to offer more threads for locking them onto the body).

    More importantly, I would think a huge issue would be the specific diameters of the individual cogs and even the direction of the threads on the cogs... and also more specifically where any given cog would have been designed to fit on one of several different diameter shoulders on a particular freewheel body. There were usually two or three different specific locations on freewheels and the sizes and the thread direction and even the thread pitch was different between Shimano or Suntour or Regina or virtually every other individual manufacturer.

    When you get into the 1980s it becomes even MORE complicated since both Suntour and Shimano were furiously experimenting with different tooth designs. For example, in some cases a chisel-tooth Suntour cog must be placed at a specific position on a body.

    I've seen some Suntour re-builds which were disastrous because the slant of the teeth tended to toss the chain off. That was because it was designed to help release the chain from one position rather than to help lift it onto that spot. This incorrect placement effectively ensured that the chain would default to the next cog rather than to land where the customer had expected. Neither the body nor the freewheel cogs were at all worn or broken, they were just not used where and as they were designed.

    Considering a transplant of a cog from one manufacturer's freewheel to another could be possible... but, it would more likely be a long-shot. I hope you would have specific data confirming the perfect suitability before bothering to disassemble anything.

    If not, this would be like assuming that you could grab any chainring off of any model of Stronglight crank and simply use it on any other model Stronglight crank... or, worst still, thinking that you might use it on any Shimano or Campagnolo crankset... simply because the number of teeth conveniently happens to be precisely the size you are looking for.

    In spite of what I've just presented... I'm honestly NOT trying to crush anyone's project.

    But, I would warn that websites like Sheldon Brown's and Loose Screws which offer rebuilt customized freewheels tend to make anything at all seem possible, and make it seem supremely easy. - In reality, the work done for both of those websites is at the hands of people who have decades of experience. AND, they also have a huge stockpile of the "correct" and completely compatible new-old-stock freewheel cogs to choose from.

    I have maybe 20 spare freewheels from several different manufacturers and I know for a fact that the cogs of only 3 would interchange at all with each other (all Reginas, and of the same model), and only then if the cogs were placed in the correct position on the body.

    I had a Regina Oro freewheel built up to be the perfect original cog pattern for my Touring Paramount. This was a pure fortuitous fluke! I happened into an old local shop which had in their store room a box of maybe 300 loose Regina Oro cogs. Even among those, of the 2 specific sizes I needed for the re-fit, there were perhaps 40 of the needed tooth size... But, when tested for the correct thread orientation and "ramp" location on the freewheel body, only 5 worked. I know this because as part of the "deal" I offered to help sort out what was a loose jumble of cogs left to gather dust many years earlier.

    Sometimes diversity and lack of uniformity between brands and models truly sucks!
    Much as I love old components, I'm absolutely thrilled that it is now finally so VERY easy to find simple Shimano or Campy compatible freehub cassettes and individual cogs with simple spacers cogs.

    Here is an example of the complexity of one freewheel model from Regina. Notice the different required locations for the various cogs to fit into the different diameter locations on the body. The threads could be either clockwise or counter-clockwise depending on their position in the array. And these did not even use directionally profiled cogs!


  9. #9
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    Wow, lots more information than I expected, thanks.

    I realize looking back that my original post wasn't very well worded or clear. I apologize as I am new to this and probably am not using the right terminology.

    To clarify, I am not trying to replace the cogs on the current freewheel. I just want to swap out for an entirely new freewheel but wasn't sure if a late 80's vintage Shimano 7400 or similar 7 speed freewheel/cogs would work in place of the 6 speed Regina freewheel I have now.

    The only reason I am concerned about the chain is that I recently bought a NOS Everest "Serie Special" chain that is correct for the vintage of the bike and I'd kind of like to use it. It is supposedly a pretty nice chain, and very light with side plates/links that are drilled/cut out. All is says on the side of the box is 3/32 x 1/2, and I'm not sure how to tell if it is narrow enough to work on a 7 speed Shimano Dura Ace Freewheel from 1989.
    Last edited by palladio; 07-11-09 at 10:40 AM.

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