Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-15-09, 03:18 PM   #1
gretchennz
NewbieNZ
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New Zealand
Bikes: Steel Frame Specialized Allez(1987), Merida Road Lite 905
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
How do I know if My bike is worth rebuilding?

Hello out there! I'm new to this forum stuff. I've have a 1985 steel Frame Specialized Allez road bike and it has seen its day! Lots of triathlons, dozens of centuries and double centuries! It went up and down the California coast and I desperatly want to restore it. How do I know if it is worth it? It is a bit rusted. I heard that Specialized has lifetime guarentees on their frames. Is this an option? I'm a bit lost on what to do. Can anyone help?
gretchennz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-09, 03:23 PM   #2
JAG410 
Senior Member
 
JAG410's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Moorhead, MN
Bikes: A few ;)
Posts: 1,021
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Does it fit you? Do you like it? Then yes I'd have it stripped and powdercoated, and then treat the frame with frame saver before assembly.
JAG410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-09, 03:33 PM   #3
Chombi 
Senior Member
 
Chombi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Bikes: 1986 Alan Record Carbonio, 1985 Vitus Plus Carbone 7, 1984 Peugeot PSV, 1972 Line Seeker, 1986(est.) Medici Aerodynamic (Project), 1985(est.) Peugeot PY10FC
Posts: 10,941
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
First inspect the frame very closely to see if it has any structural damage (major dents, cracks, rust....etc). With that many miles for all those years, it might have picked up some damage along the way. If everything seems OK, then the Allez frame is definitely worth restoring. It's been Specialize's good entry level sport frame for the longest time and an 80's model can defintely be considered a classic. It will be nice if most of the original finish is still intact on the bike, but with all those miles I suspect it might need a re-paint. Good thing about restoring a Specialized classic is you are not as limited with the choice of components as you might be with a Gitane or a Peugeot. You can slap on any good compnenet gruppo on it like a Cyclone MkII up to Dura Ace levels and they will all fit and work great. you can even put on good quality Italian gruppos on it without looking out of place.
If everything looks OK structurally, I'd go for it and give that classic bike another 20+ years of life!

Chombi
84 Peugeot PSV
Chombi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-09, 03:34 PM   #4
gretchennz
NewbieNZ
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New Zealand
Bikes: Steel Frame Specialized Allez(1987), Merida Road Lite 905
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
silly question: What is powdercoating?

Hi Jag410! Thanks for the reply. I know how to ride (really well actually) BUT I am clueless about rebuilding a bike. Yes I love my bike and Yes it fits. What is powdercoating? How do I know if my frame is still good to even attempt this! I know this will be a long term experience for me but I really want to do this and refit the bike with new modern components, etc. Any more Advice? Cheers!
gretchennz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-09, 03:37 PM   #5
gretchennz
NewbieNZ
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New Zealand
Bikes: Steel Frame Specialized Allez(1987), Merida Road Lite 905
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
OMG! This forum stuff is so cool! Thanks so much. I am so excited about this and your post has motivated me even more! I really appreciate you knowledge and love of bikes! Thanks so much. I will keep you all posted! Cheers from New Zealand
gretchennz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-09, 03:48 PM   #6
Mike Mills
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 2,930
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you like it, if it has fond memories for you, then the answer is 100% in the affirmative. Conserve it or restore it. It is yours, really and truly yours. No one else in the entire world will appreciate it for what it is, where it's been and the joy it has brought.

Now, how much should you put into it? As much as you see fit to spend.
Mike Mills is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-09, 04:09 PM   #7
Oscuro
Senior Member
 
Oscuro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Victoria, B.C. Canada
Bikes: LHT, International, 310
Posts: 317
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Powdercoating is an alternative to paint. It comes in slightly less colours than paint, but it does have unique colors and finishing options.

In essence, Powdercoating is spraying a dry, polymer-like powder onto the frame, and then sticking it into an oven for a while to melt the Polymer into a liquid. It flows over the frame, and provides a very tough finish to the frame.
There are no problems with "baking" the coating onto the frame, as the temperature is too low to melt brazing, welding, or even disturb the temper (hardness) of the steel. Typically the powders cure at 200 degrees C.
Oscuro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-09, 04:34 PM   #8
dbakl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Bikes: Cinelli, Paramount, Raleigh, Carlton, Zeus, Gemniani, Frejus, Legnano, Pinarello, Falcon
Posts: 5,775
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Meaning, will it be WORTH what restoring costs to someone else? Probably not, but if you love it, why not?

Unless crashed or abused, bikes rarely wear out; probably plenty of life left. If its been a loyal friend, keep it around.

BTW, my wife has the same bike, even though she recently bought a new bike she still throws it in the car, takes it to work and rides at lunch.
dbakl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-09, 04:41 PM   #9
wrk101
DRF aka Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: The NC Mountains
Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue, 87 Cimarron, 14 frame school custom, 73 Paramount
Posts: 19,974
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
+1 Will you be able to get the money out of it if you do it? No.

So the reason to do it is that the bike fits and you plan to ride it. Not all bike expenditures are investments.

The way to control costs is to do the work yourself and to scrounge up some parts (the old donor bike concept).
wrk101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-09, 04:42 PM   #10
Proofide
Senior Member
 
Proofide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Lancashire, England
Bikes: 1971 Bob Jackson, 1976 Dawes Galaxy, 1999 Townsend Harlequin
Posts: 352
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Is the rust on the inside or the outside? If the latter, it can be cleaned off with wet-and-dry abrasive paper used with soap and water. This also gives the steel a suitable surface for painting over. You can then apply an etching primer, and the paint of your choice. If the rust is inside, you can buy various treatments which will stop the rust and apply a protective coating. You can get products like Waxoyl which give further protection. Your bike is worth rebuilding if you love it - it's as simple as that. A rebuild is never cheap, but you learn a lot, and the experience stands you in good stead in the future.

Last edited by Proofide; 08-15-09 at 04:56 PM.
Proofide is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-09, 05:01 PM   #11
bikemeister
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Tucson, AZ
Bikes:
Posts: 771
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
And they aren't making any more '85 Allez's!
Ditto on what's been said. A quality steel frame will last virtually forever, so long as there isn't any penetrated rust or structural damage. Definite candidate for restoration.
bikemeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-09, 06:41 PM   #12
Ronsonic
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sunny Tampa, Florida
Bikes:
Posts: 1,259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
If it fits and you like it and it was a quality frame in the first place without serious structural problems, then hell yes. This isn't about money since you won't be able to sell it for all it would take to make it perfect and sweet. But then you can make it perfect and sweet for a lot less than a new bike would cost.

You can also upgrade whatever you like. Want 8, 9, 10 or 11 speeds and brifters you can do that. Or you can just replace the parts that are worn or broken.

It really, really helps if you can do most of the work yourself.

How bad's the rust?

And let me point out that the coin of this realm is pictures. We demand pictures of your bike. Especially the really pretty bits and the ugly parts. We obtain an unnatural pleasure in looking at bikes.
Ronsonic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-09, 12:27 PM   #13
svgeek
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Bikes: Felt, Marin, Scott
Posts: 80
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
+1 if there's no structural damage and rust is only on the surface, it's worth restoring.

Bike restoration is not about the economics unless you want to fix it up and sell it for a profit. Sure it'll always end up costing more than that el cheapo $500 bike, but the skills you'll pick up along the way will be priceless. Not to mention the pride you'll feel when you're out there riding the bike that you built with your own hands...


Ben
svgeek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-09, 03:05 PM   #14
RobbieTunes 
Idiot Pro Tempo
 
RobbieTunes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: NC
Bikes: at Pedal Room
Posts: 20,840
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 248 Post(s)
Subjective decision. If selling it or giving it away doesn't bother you, do so.

One idea is to sell the parts you're going to upgrade, offset the upgrade cost.

Main thing is, you have to decide. We can't decide for you.
__________________

Robbie ♪♫♪...☻

Use both sides of the towel.

1985 Raleigh Racing USA - Competition (honoring cehowardGS)
1988 Centurion Dave Scott Ironman Master
1989 Centurion Dave Scott Ironman Expert
1989 Centurion Carbon R

http://www.pedalroom.com/members/RobbieTunes
RobbieTunes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-09, 12:46 PM   #15
bikegeekmn
bikegeekmn
 
bikegeekmn's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: duluth
Bikes: Miyata710, 04' Fisher Cake, '63 Raleigh 3-speed sport, Giant FCR1, 89''Mita Quick Cross, Lotus Grand Prix Luxe, Nashbar Al. DT shifter road bike,
Posts: 284
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Worth it?That is usually a question you need to ask yourself. The lifetime guarentee on a frame normally wo'nt cover use or rust.you could take it to your local specialized dealer he may get a kick out of it .Sometimes they might even offer help of some kind(parts or reference).If this bike has history with you ,working on it typically will be quite rewarding.Most people on bf cv would rebuild or restore ANYTHING.In short yes ,of course it's worth it, but you posted in a place where that's what we/they do.


oh yeah,let's see some pics, you can start your pride a little prematurely.We would love to see it-most of us reading this already have a picture in our heads of what we think it looks like
bikegeekmn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-09, 01:04 PM   #16
delicious 
dork
 
delicious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: berkeley
Bikes:
Posts: 1,577
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
I think it's almost certainly worth restoring, even if only for its sentimental value to you! If you could post some pictures of the frame, especially where you think it might be rusted/damaged, we could probably help more.
delicious is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-09, 01:44 PM   #17
QuickDraw
Trout!
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: St. Paul, MN
Bikes: Fuji Absolute of unknown age, '86 Raleigh Grand Prix
Posts: 254
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It could be a Collectible frame if it was made by 3rensho, could be quite a valuable frame you have there. any pictures of the fork crown would be helpful.
QuickDraw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-09, 02:18 PM   #18
gretchennz
NewbieNZ
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New Zealand
Bikes: Steel Frame Specialized Allez(1987), Merida Road Lite 905
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Apparently, I should keep writing on this thread according to my husband. I submitted two new ones yesterday about mu plans for my 85 Allez which is thrashed by the way! Anyway, I plan to stip it and then get it checked out for structural damages and rust, stop the rust and then decide how to paint it- either powdercoating or paint myself. I'd liek to see if I can contact Specialized and see if they have the original "red" color. Just an idea. I have pictures but I have no idea how to get them on the thread. I'll keep asking. Thanks for all your help. Cheers!
gretchennz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-09, 02:31 PM   #19
lotek
Forum Admin
 
lotek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: n.w. superdrome
Bikes: 1 trek, serotta, rih, de Reus, Pogliaghi and finally a Zieleman! and got a DeRosa
Posts: 17,712
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Hi Gretchen,

first of all (ok, a bit late) welcome to Bike Forums, and more specifically welcome to Classic & Vintage,
what I think is the best of Bike Forums.
When you say 'thrashed' can you expound a bit? paint scratched, chipped and scuffed? or dents, dings and rust all over it? Those are all very different things.
Is there a good bike shop near you? perhaps a framebuilder local to you? both of those options can
help determine the amount of damage your frame has, if any.
I would say given your history with the frame, and the way you talk about it that yes it's definitely
worth restoring. And I'd suggest having it professionally painted, most home rattle can paint jobs
don't look that great and don't wear very well.
when you contact Specialized see if they can send you the paint code for that colour red, that should
make it easier for any painter to recreate the colour.
If you want I know a few collectors in Nz and I could ask them about painters ( say for a hei matei, haha)

Marty
__________________
Sono pił lento di quel che sembra.
Odio la gente, tutti.


Want to upgrade your membership? Click Here.
lotek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-09, 03:06 PM   #20
Vo2min
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chombi View Post
First inspect the frame very closely to see if it has any structural damage (major dents, cracks, rust....etc). With that many miles for all those years, it might have picked up some damage along the way. If everything seems OK, then the Allez frame is definitely worth restoring. It's been Specialize's good entry level sport frame for the longest time and an 80's model can defintely be considered a classic. It will be nice if most of the original finish is still intact on the bike, but with all those miles I suspect it might need a re-paint. Good thing about restoring a Specialized classic is you are not as limited with the choice of components as you might be with a Gitane or a Peugeot. You can slap on any good compnenet gruppo on it like a Cyclone MkII up to Dura Ace levels and they will all fit and work great. you can even put on good quality Italian gruppos on it without looking out of place.
If everything looks OK structurally, I'd go for it and give that classic bike another 20+ years of life!

Chombi
84 Peugeot PSV
Hi Gretchen,
Welcome to the C & V forum.
Chombi is right about the frame being a classic. The newer Allez models are not steel anymore.
Regarding the replacement of components, I have an '84 Allez and on mine, the handlebars, stem and cranks are all engraved "Specialized". If your bike has these, make sure you keep them. It's rare to see such details on todays bikes.
Take your time with the restoration. It will be worth it.
Vo2min is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-09, 04:19 PM   #21
Ronsonic
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sunny Tampa, Florida
Bikes:
Posts: 1,259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Let me just say that unless your life already includes compressors and detail guns and paint you are better off finding a local powder coater who has done bikes and giving him the frame and some money. The $100-120 for a basic PC job is well worth being able to keep those things out of your life.
Ronsonic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:40 PM.