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Old 08-18-09, 07:02 PM   #1
Zaphod Beeblebrox 
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Wheelbuilding/Truing stand options

Whats a good quality stand? I've got a Minoura True-Pro and I absolutely hate it. It wobbles and you're never sure if the wheel is in entirely straight, and the caliper won't hold its adjustment...its garbage, but I got what I paid for.

Is the TS-8 much better than the Minoura True-Pro?
Is the Park TS-2 going to satisfy me? I build 2-3 sets per year and do a little truing as needed.
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Old 08-18-09, 07:29 PM   #2
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I bought a Spin Doctor stand from Performance a number of years ago. Not as good as the Park stand (although not as many knobs to twist either...). I use it about 5 times a year.

http://www.performancebike.com/bikes..._1030340_-1___

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Old 08-18-09, 07:33 PM   #3
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I think that stand is generally the same as the Minoura that he doesn't like.

I am in the market myself but from my understanding if you are going to be doing a decent amount then the Park TS-2 is the way to go.
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Old 08-18-09, 07:37 PM   #4
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I'm probably going to get a TS-2 and mounting base before the end of the year. If you don't abuse them they work well. I'm not sure if you still need the leg extenders for working on 29er wheels or if the current production has longer legs than other ones.

Take a bent wobbly wheel and a 6-pack of your favorite beverage down to your local bike shop and see if they'll let you play around with their truing stands on a slow day or after hours to see if you like how it works.

I don't know what the European bike tool manufacturers offer but do know they make some nice stuff over there as well.

edit to add:
I just ran a google search on truing stands and came up with a bunch of links for do it yourself stands, then came across this Hozan one that I would really like to have:
http://halifax.kijiji.ca/c-buy-and-s...AdIdZ139914534

Last edited by treebound; 08-18-09 at 07:43 PM.
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Old 08-18-09, 07:39 PM   #5
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Gee, I learned to build wheels on a stand my friend in college made; really crude. 20 years I bought this Cinelli stand thats made to be put in a vice; I mounted it to a chuck of wood as a base.

Basically, a truing stand just needs to hold the wheel firmly and provide some adjustable quides to access the needed spoke turning. Its really a basic tool.

Heck, you could do it in the frame with the brake shoes and a rubber band for round...
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Old 08-18-09, 08:00 PM   #6
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I'm not impressed by the TS-8, but then again I regularly use a TS-2 and it's hard hard to take that big step down.

The TS-2 will work with a 29er, you just have to remove the tire to clear the arm.
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Old 08-18-09, 08:44 PM   #7
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OK.. I've got to ask a question. I've used the TS-2 a number of times and one thing that I didn't like was that you seemed to have to center the wheel inside the truing tongs. The Spin Doctor (Minoura...?) lets me adjust one or the other side if I wish. When I try to true a wheel that is way off, for example, using the TS-2, I am unable to work just one side. (In fact, I have to rig some way to hold one tong back...)

That's one reason why I liked the Spin Doctor (other than the fact that I'm used to it...) (And I'm not saying there it a great stand... I dislike having to tighten the wheel against a plastic wheel holder... you need to be very careful with it.)

Is there something I'm missing?
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Old 08-18-09, 08:45 PM   #8
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I've used them all, basically. At least the standard commercial ones. I have a TS-2 from Park. There's really no turning back, but you can make do with most anything in a pinch. And unless you drop your TS-2 out of an airplane, or get it run over by a train, it retains a pretty high re-sale value.
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Old 08-18-09, 08:54 PM   #9
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From my experience the TS-2 should be dish neutral. So if you're working with a wheel that's way off you first have to center the wheel dishing (Jobst Brandt I'm not).

As to 29er wheels, and fat tired 700c, the shop I help at has leg extenders that look like they were once made by ParkTool. I have't found a part number on them yet. Maybe I'll go post a question on their site.
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Old 08-18-09, 08:59 PM   #10
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Seems like you could make one pretty easily. I might have to grab a few pieces of scrap and fire up the welder...
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Old 08-18-09, 09:16 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by treebound View Post

As to 29er wheels, and fat tired 700c, the shop I help at has leg extenders that look like they were once made by ParkTool. I have't found a part number on them yet. Maybe I'll go post a question on their site.
The extensions are part # TS-2EXT, and are still made today. Don't waste your time with a TS-8. I had one at first and absolutely hated it. I bought a slightly used TS-2 and never looked back. There is a reason it is THE TRUING stands for bike shops.
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Old 08-19-09, 06:30 AM   #12
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Yep, that the extender arm part number. I got an email reply from Calvin Jones at ParkTool this morning.
http://www.parktool.com/products/det...6&item=TS-2EXT
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Old 08-19-09, 06:51 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by treebound View Post
I just ran a google search on truing stands and came up with a bunch of links for do it yourself stands, then came across this Hozan one that I would really like to have:
http://halifax.kijiji.ca/c-buy-and-s...AdIdZ139914534
I used one of those for 12 years....awesome is an understatement.
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Old 08-19-09, 06:55 AM   #14
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Who works at shop and can get me one of these at cost plus 10%?

http://www.hozan.co.jp/cycle_e/catalog/wheel/C-330.htm


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Old 08-19-09, 07:34 AM   #15
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I have a 40-year-old VAR truing stand, but I have trued many wheels simply by mounting them on a well-aligned frameset and using the brakepads as a guide.
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Old 08-19-09, 08:01 AM   #16
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I have a rusty old Huffy fork clamped between two pieces of 8 x 8 lumber. I bend it wide for back wheels, I bend it narrow for front wheels. I clamp on a piece of metal to serve as a guide, and move it around as necessary. One day it will break from metal fatigue and I will have to dive into a dumpster to replace it.
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Old 08-19-09, 11:41 AM   #17
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I've got an old Varsity flat-bladed fork...they are pretty springy..maybe I should look into building something using that and the caliper off the Minoura True-crap
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Old 08-19-09, 12:25 PM   #18
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OK.. I've got to ask a question. I've used the TS-2 a number of times and one thing that I didn't like was that you seemed to have to center the wheel inside the truing tongs. The Spin Doctor (Minoura...?) lets me adjust one or the other side if I wish. When I try to true a wheel that is way off, for example, using the TS-2, I am unable to work just one side. (In fact, I have to rig some way to hold one tong back...)

That's one reason why I liked the Spin Doctor (other than the fact that I'm used to it...) (And I'm not saying there it a great stand... I dislike having to tighten the wheel against a plastic wheel holder... you need to be very careful with it.)

Is there something I'm missing?
Apperently, yes. The TS-2 is designed to automatically center the rim on the hub(dish) as is the current Minoura. Older models that used independent screws to locate the rim allow you to easily true a rim off center and then you go back and correct the dish. Much faster to use the calipers and set the dish and true at the same time.
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Old 08-19-09, 03:00 PM   #19
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That Hozan stand brings back a hazy memory from the very dusty regions of my brain. I've definitely used one, but I can't remember where or when. And for some reason, I get a bad emotion when I think about it. Maybe I didn't like the stand. Maybe it was in disrepair. Or maybe I had a nasty boss in the shop that had the stand. Looking at it objectively, I can't see why I wouldn't like that stand, except that it's not self-centering.
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Old 08-19-09, 06:11 PM   #20
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Apperently, yes. The TS-2 is designed to automatically center the rim on the hub(dish) as is the current Minoura. Older models that used independent screws to locate the rim allow you to easily true a rim off center and then you go back and correct the dish. Much faster to use the calipers and set the dish and true at the same time.
Now that you explain it, this makes complete sense. I just never realized the purpose of "self-centering".
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Old 08-19-09, 06:23 PM   #21
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I dunno, but I always just use my front fork by flipping my bike on my living room floor to true my wheels with my brake pads as the centering "feeler gauges". I just made sure I flip the wheel when doing the truing so that everything is sure to be centered. As long as you know you have a very straight front fork, I think it works well enough for most recreational riders.
But if you're a racer and have multiple wheels to true, it will be worth it to have a trueing stand on a bench then.
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Old 08-20-09, 07:07 AM   #22
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The TS-2's centering is not perfect, and it needs occasional recalibrating, which is a bit of trouble. When you're done with a wheel in the stand, you still have to check it with a dishing tool, but you won't have to make a big correction. So yes, it does save time.

As others have said repeatedly, a better stand saves time but doesn't improve the result!
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Old 08-20-09, 08:48 AM   #23
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I always hooked a Park spoke wrench under one pointer on the TS-2 to keep it out of the way so I could keep my attention on one pointer. The TS2 is a crude but wonderful device.
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Old 08-20-09, 09:11 AM   #24
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The TS-2's centering is not perfect, and it needs occasional recalibrating, which is a bit of trouble. When you're done with a wheel in the stand, you still have to check it with a dishing tool, but you won't have to make a big correction. So yes, it does save time.

As others have said repeatedly, a better stand saves time but doesn't improve the result!

Correct me if I'm wrong here, but if its an 'auto centering' stand and its well calibrated, the calipers on the stand should be as accurate if not more than a dishing stick. RIght?
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Old 08-20-09, 09:48 AM   #25
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Correct me if I'm wrong here, but if its an 'auto centering' stand and its well calibrated, the calipers on the stand should be as accurate if not more than a dishing stick. RIght?
A proper dishing tool is the gold standard.
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