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  1. #1
    Member dutchmorphology's Avatar
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    Tire pressure Re: 1984 Team Fuji

    I just got my first road bike- a 1984 team fuji- and had a quick q. about tire pressure: the tires say max psi 120; do I need to inflate them to ~120 psi in order to avoid damaging the wheels? The bike shop only pumped them up to about 80, I was unsure if that was due to some constraint imposed by the rims or w/e.


  2. #2
    car dodger norskagent's Avatar
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    120 is the max.
    ~80 is a min., much below that and you risk getting pinch flats. For everyday riding, run them ~100-120.
    1989 Schwinn Paramount OS
    1980 Mclean/Silk Hope Sport Touring
    1983 Bianchi pista
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  3. #3
    Member dutchmorphology's Avatar
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    thanks for the quick reply.

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    what norskagent said. With a lower pressure you will get a more comfortable ride. With a higher pressure your bike will be noticeably faster. I always keep my tires near at the max pressure

  5. #5
    Ellensburg, WA scozim's Avatar
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    I typically ride mine at 120 psi rear and 115-118 psi on the front. I don't usually go lower than 100 psi.
    1984 Gitane Sprint; 1984 Gitane Tour de France;1982 Trek 610; 1980's Univega Supra Sport; 1975 Teledyne Titan;1984 Peugeot PSV10N; 1968 Peugeot PL8; ;1982 Nishiki Marina 12; 1977 Peugeot PX-10; 1987 Trek 800 Antelope (touring/commuting set up); 1981 Trek 510; 1993 or 1994 Scott Comp Racing mtb; 1996 Klein Pulse II mtb; 1980's Peugeot Limestone hybrid;

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  6. #6
    Seņor Member USAZorro's Avatar
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    Tire pressure needed depends on tire size and the weight it needs to support. If you're a featherweight, you can go close to the bottom of the range. If you're a brick, go near the top.
    The search for inner peace continues...

  7. #7
    Seņor Member USAZorro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prof2k View Post
    what norskagent said. With a lower pressure you will get a more comfortable ride. With a higher pressure your bike will be noticeably faster. I always keep my tires near at the max pressure
    That depends a lot on the tire, and again, on tire size. I have 26mm tires that I pump to about 85 psi in front, 90 in the rear. They have a max pressure of 110 psi. I routinely coast down hills faster than people with 23's pumped to 120 (even heavier people). Obviously, if you're underinflated, you'll go slower, but there's a lot more to a fast tire than simply size and psi.
    The search for inner peace continues...

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