Bike Forums

Bike Forums (http://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Classic & Vintage (http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/)
-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/623699-love-english-3-speeds.html)

snarkypup 01-13-11 12:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LuckyChow99 (Post 12070154)
It just goes to show that you never know when the force is going to be with you! I took a couple photos of the DL-1 if I can get them posted below. I look forward to sharing with you guys a lot more in the near future.

Welcome! You'll find such a great group here. And what a wonderful find at such a low price! Amazing. Show us more!

AL NZ 01-13-11 04:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by noglider (Post 12063862)
Hmm, I always did it by underinflating it. I'll try Steve's technique next time. (Steve is velognome's super-mechanic.)

I've got a hump in my front tyre from the same problem, on my '55 Raleigh FG 4 speed.
Even on smooth tarseal it's giving me Carpal Tunnel Syndrome at the front, haemorrhoids at the back, and chronic perineal... well, never mind.

Anyway, I like the idea of pinching the overinflated tyre in the vise, but I have the wonderfull full chaincase which renders removing the rear wheel about as much fun as a colonoscopy.
Unless I can get a second pair of hands to hold the whole bike up in the air while I position the rear tyre in the vise...

oldroads 01-13-11 06:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by noglider (Post 12037132)
sekaijim, you're killing me with those pictures. My 22-year-old daughter used to look like that. She also loves working with her hands. She's in college for graphic design.

Yeah, and both my daughters (19 and 22) started working on bikes at that age, though not with a hammer.
Matter of fact, the 19 year old, still home from college, is coming into to help me out in the shop today!!

Velognome 01-13-11 07:55 AM

Quote:

Anyway, I like the idea of pinching the overinflated tyre in the vise, but I have the wonderfull full chaincase which renders removing the rear wheel about as much fun as a colonoscopy.
Unless I can get a second pair of hands to hold the whole bike up in the air while I position the rear tyre in the vise...
Better solution: Bolt the vise to the garage floor. The technique is to grab the tire on either side of the offending area and rock and pull to seat the bead. Then reposition the gripping device closer to ground zero and repeat. Took me about a half dozen pinch-rock and pulls to get the tire seated. Good luck, I used close to 100 psi in a 70 psi tire.

sekaijin 01-13-11 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LuckyChow99 (Post 12070154)
Needless to say, I am overjoyed with these two bikes. Since you almost never see these bikes in this area, I asked them how they came to own them. The lady said that they once lived in NJ (where they bought the bikes) and brought them down when they moved to Atlanta 15 years ago. They've been hanging on the wall in their basement ever since. It just goes to show that you never know when the force is going to be with you! I took a couple photos of the DL-1 if I can get them posted below. I look forward to sharing with you guys a lot more in the near future.

Welcome to the forums.
Great find!

Doohickie 01-13-11 08:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LuckyChow99 (Post 12070154)
I drove over to their home in a very nice, upscale neighborhood and took a look at the bikes. Much to my surprise, they had a DL-1 and a DL-1L that were in unbelievable great shape. I quickly paid the $50 each they were asking and loaded the bikes onto my bike rack. It turns out this couple were the original owners of these two 1974 Tourist’s and they proceeded to give me the owner’s manual, assembly guide, warranty cards, and a "bike tool" that came with the bikes.

What hub dates do the bikes have? They are on the rear hubs, usually in a format like 74 6 (which would mean June, 1974 in this example). The reason I ask is that the bike pictured looks older than 1974, based on the chain guard and the rear reflector.

Amesja 01-13-11 08:47 AM

I've never had a serious problem with the Kendas on my Stock steel Raleigh-pattern "Westrick" rims. Before I had the Kendas I had a couple of older tires that were on the bike when I took possession of it (not the original Dunlops as they were long wore out 50 years ago even). I put them on and took them off a few times while messing around with the bike and a few times they didn't quite want to seat properly and since they were so old and deteriorating I was loath to over-inflate them.

But it wasn't a problem that couldn't be solved by deflating the tire and re-adjusting the bead a little bit on the rim and reinflating. I don't think it ever took more than two tries to get one to seat. Then again I used to race motorcycles and getting certain tires with wheel-locks to seat on an abused/raced off-road rim is much more difficult sometimes. Bicycle tires/rims are cake in comparison.

But the Kenda K35's were no problem at all for me. I've heard that people who have replaced their rims with alloy CR-18's report some fitment issues sometimes. Some feel they are made a little large or something.

LuckyChow99 01-13-11 12:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doohickie (Post 12070936)
What hub dates do the bikes have? They are on the rear hubs, usually in a format like 74 6 (which would mean June, 1974 in this example). The reason I ask is that the bike pictured looks older than 1974, based on the chain guard and the rear reflector.

Doohickie, the hub on the pictured bike is January of 1974. The lady's bike (not pictured) was December of 1973.

David Newton 01-13-11 01:19 PM

I'm probably not telling anyone anything new, but I use Turtlewax vinyl protectant, a product like Armorall, but cheaper, when mounting tires. I spray the rim, wipe down the tube, and wipe the seating surfaces of the tire. It all slithers together, and when airing up, just oozes into shape.
It doesn't seem to hurt the brake shoes, after the first scrubbing-off stops.

I learned this on motorcycle tires, which are much harder to deal with.

Amesja 01-13-11 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David Newton (Post 12072223)
I learned this on motorcycle tires, which are much harder to deal with.

I use Ideal Yellow 77 Cable Lube for mounting motorcycle tires.

kingfish254 01-13-11 03:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver (Post 12070176)
One of my favourite English three speeds... in one of my favourite places.

http://www.ravingbikefiend.com/bikepics/2011pdx1.JPG

Your looking a little stiff there!

LuckyChow99 01-13-11 08:05 PM

Sixty Fiver, that's a really beautiful bike. I've never seen a Twenty in person. They look very ruggedly built.

I have a general question that I'd like some input on from the forum. I've got to replace the tires on my Tourist's bikes, as they are original. Should the tube be replaced as well? The tubes are the ones with the threaded stem all the way to the rim. As far as I know, these are not made any more. So any replacement would not have threading all the way down. Correct?

noglider 01-13-11 08:28 PM

I just started a thread: What should I do with my Raleigh Twenty?

matchswain 01-13-11 09:30 PM

Hello all,

While in a dusty garage looking at an old Schwinn last night, I saw this hanging in a dark corner...and wanted it. Without the dust it's in nice shape. The AW hub shows "78," so I presume the rest of the bike would be dated the same (I can picture those graphics coming out of the 1970's anyway).

Clearly there are quite a few things that need to be upgraded (vinyl seat, disgusting - and stretched - chain, rotting tires) and I know that it's probably a lower-end Sports model, but the appeal is, well, probably much of the same appeal that keeps many of you posting your new 3-speed finds here.

My question is: have any of you found a Sports with the bars pictured? I've looked through every photo I can find, and non of the stock Sports bars look nearly as high as mine, though it could be a trick of the cameras. They're about 9" from the stem to the curve near the grips. I'm just curious how close to a stock bike I have, or what may have been changed over the years.

Also, if it looks like a bike that I should get rid of and try again, I'd like to hear it.

Thanks for looking.

http://lh4.ggpht.com/_sx2MZTGYOZs/TS...0/P1030847.JPG

http://lh5.ggpht.com/_sx2MZTGYOZs/TS...0/P1030849.jpg

Sixty Fiver 01-13-11 09:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by matchswain (Post 12074380)
Hello all,

While in a dusty garage looking at an old Schwinn last night, I saw this hanging in a dark corner...and wanted it. Without the dust it's in nice shape. The AW hub shows "78," so I presume the rest of the bike would be dated the same (I can picture those graphics coming out of the 1970's anyway).

Clearly there are quite a few things that need to be upgraded (vinyl seat, disgusting - and stretched - chain, rotting tires) and I know that it's probably a lower-end Sports model, but the appeal is, well, probably much of the same appeal that keeps many of you posting your new 3-speed finds here.

My question is: have any of you found a Sports with the bars pictured? I've looked through every photo I can find, and non of the stock Sports bars look nearly as high as mine, though it could be a trick of the cameras. They're about 9" from the stem to the curve near the grips. I'm just curious how close to a stock bike I have, or what may have been changed over the years.

Also, if it looks like a bike that I should get rid of and try again, I'd like to hear it.

Thanks for looking.

There was no bottom of the line Raleigh Sports and your bike just had had it's bars and saddle replaced... am guessing that it's previous owner really liked to sit upright.

The colour is great and if it fits it won't take much to change the bars and saddle.

Doohickie 01-13-11 09:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LuckyChow99 (Post 12072041)
Doohickie, the hub on the pictured bike is January of 1974. The lady's bike (not pictured) was December of 1973.

Hmmm... I thought they had switched to the dorky reflector by then.

Sixty Fiver 01-13-11 10:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LuckyChow99 (Post 12074003)
Sixty Fiver, that's a really beautiful bike. I've never seen a Twenty in person. They look very ruggedly built.

I have a general question that I'd like some input on from the forum. I've got to replace the tires on my Tourist's bikes, as they are original. Should the tube be replaced as well? The tubes are the ones with the threaded stem all the way to the rim. As far as I know, these are not made any more. So any replacement would not have threading all the way down. Correct?

You can still buy tubes with fully threaded stems for Schraeder valves... Michelin and Schwalbe make premium tubes like this.

It seems like a lot of people have never seen a Twenty here as many people have been asking about my little bike and a few have been amazed to discover it is also 37 years old... it really could not have come to me in better shape and I then upgraded the wheels and brakes.

LuckyChow99 01-13-11 10:52 PM

Thanks Sixty Fiver for the reply. Are you in agreement that the tubes should be replaced when the tires are? Also, I've not seen these premium tubes offered anywhere. Do you know who sells them?

matchswain 01-13-11 10:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver (Post 12074451)
There was no bottom of the line Raleigh Sports and your bike just had had it's bars and saddle replaced... am guessing that it's previous owner really liked to sit upright.

The colour is great and if it fits it won't take much to change the bars and saddle.

That's good to hear; I'll search out a B66 and some bars. What's a good source for period-correct north roads bars?

Sixty Fiver 01-13-11 11:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LuckyChow99 (Post 12074705)
Thanks Sixty Fiver for the reply. Are you in agreement that the tubes should be replaced when the tires are? Also, I've not seen these premium tubes offered anywhere. Do you know who sells them?

Tubes can last a very long time as they are protected from what kills tyres, namely UV radiation.

I have pulled supple tubes from tyres so old they were crumbling and used them.

mkeller234 01-13-11 11:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver (Post 12074451)
There was no bottom of the line Raleigh Sports and your bike just had had it's bars and saddle replaced...

I had a 1970s Malaysian built Raleigh sports that I have been told was the budget model. It had a few differences like no pump peg, no lamp bracket, a vinyl brooks saddle and maybe the rims were different. Other than that is was just your basic sports.

matchswain 01-13-11 11:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mkeller234 (Post 12074793)
I had a 1970s Malaysian built Raleigh sports that I have been told was the budget model. It had a few differences like no pump peg, no lamp bracket, a vinyl brooks saddle and maybe the rims were different. Other than that is was just your basic sports.

Did the Malaysian models still have the "Made in England" script on the top tube? Mine does, but it makes me wonder...

Sixty Fiver 01-13-11 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mkeller234 (Post 12074793)
I had a 1970s Malaysian built Raleigh sports that I have been told was the budget model. It had a few differences like no pump peg, no lamp bracket, a vinyl brooks saddle and maybe the rims were different. Other than that is was just your basic sports.

Your basic Raleigh Sports is a really good but rather basic bicycle... leather saddles, lamp brackets (along with a lamp and generator), and pump pegs are what came with the Superbe as standard equipment.

sekaijin 01-14-11 10:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver (Post 12074743)
Tubes can last a very long time as they are protected from what kills tyres, namely UV radiation.

I have pulled supple tubes from tyres so old they were crumbling and used them.

Like hearing that - I just did exactly that, and wondered if I'd regret pulling such a velo cheapo move. Your comment helps my peace of mind!

FishBiscuit 01-14-11 04:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LuckyChow99 (Post 12070154)
They had a DL-1 and a DL-1L that were in unbelievable great shape. I quickly paid the $50 each they were asking and loaded the bikes onto my bike rack. It turns out this couple were the original owners of these two 1974 Tourist’s and they proceeded to give me the owner’s manual, assembly guide, warranty cards, and a "bike tool" that came with the bikes.

Holy cow! That's quite a haul! Great find! They're wonderful bikes- I love mine. We've got three at my house now, only not in as good of shape as yours!


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:12 PM.