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Old 03-17-11, 11:14 AM   #1451
Sixty Fiver
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Yeah, a 24" DL-1 would do, but I'm not crazy about a 40+ lb bike with rod brakes. It's just not something I need (as if that's the criterion I use with any bike purchase). I will probably build an approximation around a sport-touring road frame at some point.
My Rudge only weighed 38 pounds... a veritable lightweight.
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Old 03-17-11, 04:07 PM   #1452
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Here is a picture of the latest acquisition...

1973 Raleigh Colt step through for my bride, along with my 1972 Superbe.

Aaron

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ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
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Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
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Old 03-17-11, 04:14 PM   #1453
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Here is a picture of the latest acquisition...

1973 Raleigh Colt step through for my bride, along with my 1972 Superbe.

Aaron
You are a good husband.
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Old 03-17-11, 06:29 PM   #1454
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You are a good husband.
Trying to stay ahead of the shoe count...

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ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
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Old 03-17-11, 08:40 PM   #1455
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I am putting the headset and the fork back together on my Superbe. Now I am curious if anyone of you would know the exact # of the loose ball bearings that go to the head tube cup and the fork crown race? I kind of tried it and #25 is the number I got.
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Old 03-17-11, 09:08 PM   #1456
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I seem to remember the number 24 but don't quote me on that. Fill it dry until you can't get any more in. If there isn't any significant rattle space between the balls then take one out. That's what I do.
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Old 03-17-11, 09:11 PM   #1457
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Sheldon says, "The headset uses 25 5/32 inch loose bearing balls in each race."
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Old 03-17-11, 09:32 PM   #1458
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Well, I've gotten my first email from the Lake Pepin crew about the ride - gotta say that I'm a bit more than excited about this. One thing though - the Phillips I have and was going to take (as the Lenton could use some more work) has a head lug that isn't completely filled. It's the top tube lug, and it's enough to catch a fingernail on the back side of the head tube.

Now, it's been like this. Probably since it was built in '68. No wobbles, no jiggles, no loose feeling, and for all intents and purposes, it doesn't affect the bike at all. I've ridden it probably 500 miles by now, and haven't encountered any expansion.

Should I be concerned? I think I'm just being overly paranoid.
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Old 03-18-11, 07:29 AM   #1459
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Thanks! Gotta try it again today.
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Old 03-18-11, 08:09 AM   #1460
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Thanks! Gotta try it again today.
I start this with the bike upside down on the stand so I can load the bottom cup (use lots of grease) and then insert the fork, tie it in place and then flip the bike back to upright to load the top and finish the assembly.

Only takes a few minutes this way.
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Old 03-18-11, 08:27 AM   #1461
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Justin, does it feel too small because of the short top tube? You have probably spent your whole adult life feeling cramped in many situations, and perhaps you get this feeling on that Sports. But it's really normal for us road riders when we jump on a Sports. The reach is extremely short. If that seat is adjusted to your height, then the bike isn't too small for you. And if you want, you can get a long-extension stem.
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Old 03-18-11, 08:39 AM   #1462
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I start this with the bike upside down on the stand so I can load the bottom cup (use lots of grease) and then insert the fork, tie it in place and then flip the bike back to upright to load the top and finish the assembly.

Only takes a few minutes this way.
I don't even flip the bike over again. I start with the bike upside down in the work stand and load the bottom race with grease and fill with bearings. Then I carefully drop the fork into the head until it seats and aligns.

I load the top/threaded race with grease and fill with bearings and screw that onto the fork from the bottom up until it seats as well. Only then do I crack the brake on the stand and rotate it back upright again to mess around with the headlight bracket, and necessary washer/shims, and the top locknut. The design of the Raleigh races allows this where a more-modern threaded headset cone won't always let you get away with this.

Holding the fork with one hand while loading 25 bearings with the other is not the easiest way to do things. On a bike where I have no choice but to flip due to the shape of the top race being cone-shaped I use a bungie to hold the fork to the frame so that it doesn't fall out by gravity or need to be held constantly. That way I can use both hands to load the top bearings. Using caged bearings on the top race makes things a lot simpler here although I usually don't buy or use them unless they come with a new headset. I keep my bearings in little glass jars that artichoke hearts come in originally and try to always buy more before the jar gets fewer than 50 left. I put the new package of 144 inside the jar but don't open the little plastic envelope in so as not to mix different bearing batches although that really isn't that big of a deal with grade 300 cheap bicycle bearings...

I use lots of grease too. A lot of grease pushes out when I assemble but it is easy to wipe off and clean and it's cheap. A big 16 oz. tub of Castrol #2 costs less than $5 at the auto parts store and lasts for years and years. I'm not worried about wasting it.
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Old 03-18-11, 09:11 AM   #1463
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Justin, does it feel too small because of the short top tube? You have probably spent your whole adult life feeling cramped in many situations, and perhaps you get this feeling on that Sports. But it's really normal for us road riders when we jump on a Sports. The reach is extremely short. If that seat is adjusted to your height, then the bike isn't too small for you. And if you want, you can get a long-extension stem.
Can I make it work? Yes. It it the proper size? No. I'm right at 6'. I was in a traumatic accident just prior to my 18th birthday and my 4th lumbar burst into shrapnel. A piece of someone else's femur bone, a fair amount of titanium nuts and bolts and bone fusion later my torso is simply shorter than it would have been otherwise. I was long-legged to begin with so this just exacerbated the issue relative to my overall height. Relatively short top tubes work for me. So, the reach can be set to accommodate me pretty easily using a taller stem with a longer reach.

The seat post as pictured is not quite high enough, but works for short rides. I'm not interested in modifying this beauty. It's just not right for me. I'd rather see it go to someone to whom it is better suited. 9-10 centimeters of stem showing is my limit. More than that and I personally feel that a bike looks bad. I'm pretty much a fistful of seat post guy too.
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Old 03-18-11, 11:02 PM   #1464
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....rotate it back upright again to mess around with the headlight bracket, and necessary washer/shims, and the top locknut.
My headset doesn't have any washer/shims in between the locknut and the top threaded race. Is that necessary? Btw you guys gave me a good lesson on how to load ball bearings in a easier way.
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Old 03-18-11, 11:10 PM   #1465
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ahson - There is usually some extra room between that locknut and the top race for a washer or light bracket.
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Old 03-19-11, 03:46 AM   #1466
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Is it Proper to post about 3+2 speeds here?

Just aquired 2 1967 Sprites - His & Hers. Had never seen these shift levers before, but they seem to be original.

Downside is the men's bike has a crimp in the downtube. Someone hit something. Seems to ride ok, smooth, goes straight. Should I worry about it?
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Old 03-19-11, 05:32 AM   #1467
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Those are 5 speeds...and they are English so I guess you can put them here.

Nice find, those are not nearly as common as the regular 3 speeds.

Aaron
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ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
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Old 03-19-11, 05:33 AM   #1468
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That bike is has quite the bend in it. I don't think it's about to fall apart at any second but it has to be felt a little bit as the steering geometry/rake has been modified quite a bit. I guess these bikes start with a pretty gentle steering angle to begin with so when a crash tightens it up a little the bike isn't too twitchy steering. Can you ride it no-handed and have it still track straight and not want to pull to one side or wobble? Then it is probably fine. I've seen much worse out there still riding around. I wouldn't ride it down mountains at break-neck speed unless you have a really strong neck...
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Old 03-21-11, 05:24 PM   #1469
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Old 03-21-11, 05:33 PM   #1470
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Japanese hub...just sayin...

Aaron
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ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
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Old 03-21-11, 05:58 PM   #1471
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LOL. Pedal isn't bent, it's the crank.

This guy is on crack.
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Old 03-21-11, 07:54 PM   #1472
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I was looking at the sports i bought my wife and i noticed one of the lugs was not looking good, i know that the 70's raleigh's were not the best made, and im petty sure this bike hasn't been in a crash. im worried about the integrity of the frame.







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Old 03-21-11, 09:14 PM   #1473
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That's probably just a void area in the lug. Not pretty, and arguably subject to rust, but unlikely to be a serious threat. Push some grease or linseed oil or something into the void to fill it and keep moisture out.
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Old 03-21-11, 09:23 PM   #1474
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thats what i thought also but just wanted some confirmation. . do you think i could spray some framesaver in there and that would work?



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That's probably just a void area in the lug. Not pretty, and arguably subject to rust, but unlikely to be a serious threat. Push some grease or linseed oil or something into the void to fill it and keep moisture out.
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Old 03-22-11, 06:34 AM   #1475
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Maybe you should use framesaver first and then follow up with grease to, um, seal it, kinda sorta.
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