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-   -   For the love of English 3 speeds... (http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/623699-love-english-3-speeds.html)

sykerocker 03-25-11 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amesja (Post 12396571)
I'm thinking peak tension isn't going to be much more than standing tension even when shifting into first (the most tension) unless the person is hammering on that lever. I don't think the cable itself would be good for more than a hundred or so pounds reliably/safely when new. I wonder how much pressure one could put on that tiny little trigger shifter. Looks like there can't be more than a 2/1 leverage ratio on that trigger from where the cable attaches to it. Maybe say 20lbs max a person could pull on that little thing without actually bringing pain to your hand. It's not like a 4-5" lever on a brake cable where there is more like a 10/1 leverage ratio on the cable.

I think a crimp would hold up pretty well if it were done right. I've seen crimps on conductors that were so durable that when equipment mounting catastrophically failed the fixture ended up hanging from the wire the crimp held the entire crash/drop weight. And that was on copper wire which deforms pretty easily so it's hard to get a crimp to hold a lot of mechanical weight when it is jerked hard.

But I suppose a solder would be best. Some brass or aluminum tubing soldered onto the cable would be exactly like that barrel formed end and would be very strong -especially if you used silver solder.

What you're considering is not all that difficult. If anything, before the mid-60's, that's how you got a cable done for a motorcycle. Dealers would either buy spools of cable and mold both ends, or maybe by universal cables with the disc at the brake/clutch lever end, cut to length and pour the remaining end. The catch is that the motorcycle shop would have molds in the service department, just lay in the cable and melt the lead. This service disappeared by the end of the 60's, unfortunately. I'd love to find an old set of molds to make my own shorter cables for my cafe' racers.

My understanding is that if the newly molded end survived the first tension or two, you were most likely good to go. I don't doubt this would be equally true to bicycle cables, given that you're talking a lot less pressure.

biaddiction 03-26-11 08:27 AM

vintage Pletscher Rear Alloy Bike Rack, model c
anyone knows the model c will fit with a raleigh sports? is it just for older 27" road bike? Thanks!

Amesja 03-26-11 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by biaddiction (Post 12413857)
vintage Pletscher Rear Alloy Bike Rack, model c
anyone knows the model c will fit with a raleigh sports? is it just for older 27" road bike? Thanks!

The Raleigh has 590mm wheels with a big wide tire and a massive steel fender. A 27" wheel is 630mm with a skinny/short tire and often many frames had barely any room for a fender. I'd say anything that fit on a 27" bike would fit on a Vintage 3-speed Raleigh roadster. If anything it'll have a bit more clearance rather than too little.

Worst case scenario is you would have to modify the way it mounts to the frame which often happens with any bike. The upright length from the wheelstay to the rack is the more important dimension.

If the price is right I'd say go for it.

Doohickie 03-26-11 02:05 PM

Too much talk so here are some new pics of The Old Gentleman from this morning's ride. It was the first ride on my new B72 (to replace the original, which split. I tell ya, after only 44 years or so, those Brooks saddles are junk!) First, the C&V pic:

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...DSC00050-1.jpg

The new saddle:

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...1/DSC00038.jpg

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...1/DSC00046.jpg

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...1/DSC00047.jpg

And a few more pics of the bike:

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...1/DSC00043.jpg

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...1/DSC00041.jpg

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...1/DSC00042.jpg

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...1/DSC00040.jpg

Velognome 03-26-11 06:12 PM

Doohickie- I love the CV shot of your DL , keep waiting for Ward and June to come out the front door with the Beaver!

Quote:

Velognome
Anyone know of a stock 25" step through? Maybe an older Pashley or R. Tourist?

Noglider
Never heard of anything like it.
To my surprise, they do exist!. A 24" drop frame Rudge built for 28" wheels....it's huge, or just right if your 6' plus. Would make the perfect townie
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$(KGrHqUOKp!...2r-Og~~_12.JPG

nlerner 03-26-11 06:16 PM

I did this to an old Rudge Sports the other day:

http://web.mit.edu/nlerner/Public/Bi...dgeSports1.jpg

http://web.mit.edu/nlerner/Public/Bi...dgeSports5.jpg

http://web.mit.edu/nlerner/Public/Bi...dgeSports6.jpg

That's 27" wheels with a rear built on a SunTour single-speed coaster-brake hub. It's about 27 lbs as shown and zippy!

Neal

Doohickie 03-26-11 08:45 PM

I think you're missin' a coupla speeds there, buddy.

erileykc 03-26-11 08:48 PM

1 Attachment(s)
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=195157
A bike for the working day. Not nearly as spiffy as many of the bikes in this thread I must admit but it's been there for me since 1980.

biaddiction 03-26-11 08:55 PM

So I bought it. After shipping is $15. Hopefuly the price is not so bad? Can't wait to receive and install it! ! ! Thanks for the info! :)

biaddiction 03-26-11 08:56 PM

So I bought it. After shipping is $15. Hopefuly the price is not so bad? Can't wait to receive and install it! ! ! Thanks for the info! :)


Quote:

Originally Posted by Amesja (Post 12413910)
The Raleigh has 590mm wheels with a big wide tire and a massive steel fender. A 27" wheel is 630mm with a skinny/short tire and often many frames had barely any room for a fender. I'd say anything that fit on a 27" bike would fit on a Vintage 3-speed Raleigh roadster. If anything it'll have a bit more clearance rather than too little.

Worst case scenario is you would have to modify the way it mounts to the frame which often happens with any bike. The upright length from the wheelstay to the rack is the more important dimension.

If the price is right I'd say go for it.


nlerner 03-26-11 09:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doohickie (Post 12416410)
I think you're missin' a coupla speeds there, buddy.

Well, here's an English 5-speed, so now I'm even!

http://web.mit.edu/nlerner/Public/Bi...ite5Speed1.jpg

Neal

Doohickie 03-26-11 09:24 PM

Hmmmm... I think I need to get a ruling on this from SixtyFiver.

Sixty Fiver 03-26-11 09:35 PM

5 speeds are fine... they are just a 3 speed with and extra 1 up and 1 down.

Just built up a new 5 speed w/ drum hub to a 700c rim for my friend's wife... her winter / utility bike currently runs a Sachs 3 speed and she needs a little more range for hauling and towing but also has an electric assist for when the going gets tough.

Have been thinking of ordering up another one of these hubs as well as a front hub with a drum brake.

Doohickie 03-26-11 10:02 PM

Yeah, but does posting a 5-speed make up for posting a single speed?

Sixty Fiver 03-26-11 10:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doohickie (Post 12416700)
Yeah, but does posting a 5-speed make up for posting a single speed?

6 total speeds with two bikes gives us an average of 3 speeds per bike... might have to let this one slide since both bikes are so nice.

What would happen if I turned a 3 speed into a dual drive and made it a 6 speed ?

banjo_mole 03-26-11 10:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nlerner (Post 12415848)
I did this to an old Rudge Sports the other day:
http://web.mit.edu/nlerner/Public/Bi...dgeSports6.jpg

That's 27" wheels with a rear built on a SunTour single-speed coaster-brake hub. It's about 27 lbs as shown and zippy!

Neal

Hey Neal!

I see you have a quick-release front hub on that bike. Did you have any trouble with the front fork spacing? I know older Raleighs had a different fork dropout spacing, didn't know if that one did too, or if it gave you any trouble.

-Nick

ecsjr 03-27-11 06:34 AM

nlerner,

That Sprite looks just like mine. But the shifters on both my step-through and my man's model are on the top tubes.

Do you know if yours is the original placement?

Easy enough to reach when on the down tube? (that placement avoids the embarassing shifter poke when coming off the seat)

Maybe we need an S5 hub thread.

nlerner 03-27-11 07:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by banjo_mole (Post 12416782)
Hey Neal!

I see you have a quick-release front hub on that bike. Did you have any trouble with the front fork spacing? I know older Raleighs had a different fork dropout spacing, didn't know if that one did too, or if it gave you any trouble.

-Nick

Nick, that's a replacement fork made for 27" wheels, so no problems with dropout spacing.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ecsjr (Post 12417410)
nlerner,
That Sprite looks just like mine. But the shifters on both my step-through and my man's model are on the top tubes.

Do you know if yours is the original placement?

Easy enough to reach when on the down tube? (that placement avoids the embarassing shifter poke when coming off the seat)

Maybe we need an S5 hub thread.

That bike came to me with top-tube mounted shifters but both levers were snapped off (lousy plastic design). I replaced them with the DT shifters shown.

Neal

nlerner 03-27-11 07:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver (Post 12416728)
What would happen if I turned a 3 speed into a dual drive and made it a 6 speed ?

Well, I turned my Grand Sports into a nine-speed with a 3-gear Cyclo block on an AW hub:

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_G...0/IMG_5620.JPG

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_G...0/IMG_5623.JPG

But I've since converted it to a 2-speed with an S-A kickback hub:

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_G...sKickback1.jpg

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_G...sKickback3.jpg

So do I credit for a 5.5 speed figuring the average of the two?

Neal

sekaijin 03-28-11 08:30 PM

Sorry to interrupt this party of counting speeds on our English (non) 3-speeds!

But I'm looking for advice on baskets for my wife's Raleigh Sports.

As some may recall, my wife is an almost-non-cyclist and I got her a 1978 emerald Ladies Sports a few years ago. It seemed to satisfy her sense of style and she has ridden it on neighborhood family rides in summer. She is now talking about using it for neighborhood grocery & errand runs once the weather gets nice enough. This is an extremely heartening development that I want to encourage.

She wants grocery baskets and I want to find her the perfect ones. She wants fixed rear baskets, newsboy style, that will fit a pair of reusable cloth grocery bags (about 13" x 7" footprint) well.

I'm thinking the Wald 520 may be the way to go. Does that seem right? Any other suggestions?

Amesja 03-28-11 09:00 PM

They make some really nice faux wicker baskets like this one.

My LBS has something like that but in aluminum which is a lot nicer and much lighter.

If you can get your wife to ride then get her something nice rather than cheaping out. Something that looks stylish and classy with that fine English three speed that will make her feel good about riding it about and makes her feel chic and fashionable. Take a look at Lovely Bicycle and see what a lady likes when it comes to fashion biking. That girl knows how to do it in style!

HSean 03-28-11 09:26 PM

I guess I should post a few of mine on here. I'm glad I didn't get rid of this bicycle when I first wanted to, It's my most fav bike I own, Id dosn't stop very well though lol, it also still needs a new seat but I did locate some nos tires that where a for it that are a weird size for the best price of Free.

I always thought it was a Sports but then I seen a picture of a golden arrow that was identical besides fenders, most other parts where the same,

Snows almost gone and it's almost time to ride it again!
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...u/100_2287.jpg

sekaijin 03-29-11 11:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amesja (Post 12426151)
They make some really nice faux wicker baskets like this one.

My LBS has something like that but in aluminum which is a lot nicer and much lighter.

If you can get your wife to ride then get her something nice rather than cheaping out. Something that looks stylish and classy with that fine English three speed that will make her feel good about riding it about and makes her feel chic and fashionable. Take a look at Lovely Bicycle and see what a lady likes when it comes to fashion biking. That girl knows how to do it in style!

Amesja, thanks for that suggestion. I will show her the faux wicker baskets. I like the look of them and I've been thinking from the outset that folding makes sense.

But I also see the Walds as a valid option with a fitting classic look (in the chrome finish that is), and not "cheaping out." In any case it will be her call.

And whatever baskets she ends up with, I'm thinking some daisies (her favorite) woven into the basket rims just might be the icing on the cake.

Re Lovely Bicycle, yes I read it on occasion and it's great. I've showed it to my wife. She has yet to show an interest. But when she says she wants cream tires, I'll know she's hooked!

nlerner 03-29-11 11:31 AM

I don't know if this will work for your wife, but for grocery hauling I used a rear rack and folding grocery panniers from Nashbar, which cost all of $15 for the pair during one of their sales. I leave those panniers on the bike (they attach easily and stay put), and they a re-usable grocery sack will to the brim fits fine. They also come with rain bonnets, which is useful when the bag is over-filled (essentially acts as a top). So the advantage is that they weigh very little, do what they're designed to do, and don't cost much. Oh, and they don't look ugly.

Neal

Amesja 03-29-11 12:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sekaijin (Post 12428613)
Amesja, thanks for that suggestion. I will show her the faux wicker baskets. I like the look of them and I've been thinking from the outset that folding makes sense.

But I also see the Walds as a valid option with a fitting classic look (in the chrome finish that is), and not "cheaping out." In any case it will be her call.

And whatever baskets she ends up with, I'm thinking some daisies (her favorite) woven into the basket rims just might be the icing on the cake.

Re Lovely Bicycle, yes I read it on occasion and it's great. I've showed it to my wife. She has yet to show an interest. But when she says she wants cream tires, I'll know she's hooked!

My LBS sells the aluminum faux wicker backets at just a hair over $100/EACH which is kind of pricey considering I can buy and build an entire E3S for less than that but they are really nice. the same LBS sells the Walds in black or chrome for $20 each. You get what you pay for though as the walds are fairly ugly (IMHO) and after a while start to get messed up and the little doo-dad hingy bits stretch and the panels slide down when they are deployed and don't stay in position like they should and rattle around. Sometimes they don't want to close or stay closed and they rattle when open (although not when closed usually).

The mounting hardware that comes with the walds is really poor. I just gave up on it and used High-quality zip ties for them except for the top two at the corners that really hold all the weight. For those I used high-quality stainless screw-drive hose clamps which are very strong. These hold the folding baskets very well against the back rack.

Make sure to check pedal clearance with the baskets open to the way your wife rides with her feet on her pedals so her heels don't clip it. If it's a smaller sized frame they might have to be put much further back than you might initially think.


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