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Old 06-18-10, 12:04 PM   #1
VR4
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Rough Peugeot - is this thing worth trying to save? Picture heavy

This Peugeot belonged to my friend's late father and has been rotting away in his mother's garage for a while now. There's a sticker that says "Cadre Allege" on it but I don't know if that's the model. There was also some numbers etched into the drop out (2143321) but I'm not sure if those are original. Any idea on the year and model of it?

It measures ~25" from the middle of the crank to the top of the seat tube and has a standover of ~34". I know he'd love to see it fixed up but I'm wondering if it's even possible or if the bike is too far gone. As you'll see from the pictures, there are spots of rust all over it. I figure all the components would obviously need to be replaced but I'm wondering if anything could be done to salvage the frame.

Any ideas or advice would be appreciated.







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Old 06-18-10, 12:06 PM   #2
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From the pictures it should clean up with some elbow grease and new tires/tubes. If you wanted you could pull it down and replace all the cables and repack all the bearings. But it looks like a solid platform. I would replace the shifters as they will probable break when used.

Edit-

Galant VR4 or 3KGT?

Last edited by that_guy_zach; 06-18-10 at 12:11 PM.
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Old 06-18-10, 12:17 PM   #3
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If the frame has no damage, the bike is not gone. Actually the paint seems in nice shape with a great patina. Early-mid 70s UO8. One thing you need to make sure is that this bike fits someone. It is huge. If it fits, you can actually upgrade it with alloy wheels, alloy 3 piece crank, alloy handlebars, alloy seatpost, shimano or suntour components and you will have a nice rider that weighs about as much as a late 80s Cromoly frame bike
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Old 06-18-10, 12:20 PM   #4
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Where there is a will, there is a way.
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Old 06-18-10, 12:31 PM   #5
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Cool, great info guys!

zach - 3000GT, though I don't own one at the moment

EjustE - The bike is much too large for my buddy but I'm ~6'2" so it fits me pretty good. Any idea of a ballpark figure I'd be looking at to upgrade at least the wheels but like the rest of the components as well?
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Old 06-18-10, 12:32 PM   #6
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Appears to be a later model UO8 and these are nice bikes that can become very nice riders when you upgrade a few parts... new alloy wheels and better derailleurs make the biggest difference as it lowers the weight and improves the performance and braking.

Just did this exact thing to an older UO8 and am really loving the ride... it is fast, comfortable, and has a certain French style.

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Old 06-18-10, 03:35 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by VR4 View Post
Cool, great info guys!

zach - 3000GT, though I don't own one at the moment

EjustE - The bike is much too large for my buddy but I'm ~6'2" so it fits me pretty good. Any idea of a ballpark figure I'd be looking at to upgrade at least the wheels but like the rest of the components as well?
Depends how creative and resourceful you get. I picked up a similar UO8 donor bike for $5, it supplied a three piece crankset and bottom bracket, along with a good stock seat, and a Suntour RD for my UO8. I am always on the lookout for five or six speed 27 inch alloy wheelsets, picked up a used set for $15. I found replacement shift levers on fleabay, got an alloy seat post and alloy bars, and I was pretty much good to go.

Pay full retail for this stuff, and in short order you will be upside down value wise. These older French bikes have unique threading and sizing, which can limit new options. For instance, Velo Orange sells a nice cartridge bottom bracket that fits great, but its $50. I have less than $50 into everything. Its a low production, specialty piece, so the cost is understandable. But a generic Shimano cartridge bb can be had for your basic vintage Japanese bike for $10.

I picked up a second UO8 donor, it was a little more expensive, $12, but it has a nice upgraded Stronglight crankset and bottom bracket. Frame is trash (that's what made it cheap). I try to keep a variety of decent French parts in hand for that next project that comes along.

Or you can just clean up what you have, put on some good cables and tires, and sell it. Then use the proceeds to fund another bike...
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Old 06-18-10, 04:21 PM   #8
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The French bikes have a really good ride - it's hard to describe without actually riding one. That said, you could probably get away with just shining up the old parts (all the steel can be polished using a wad of tinfoil - try it!), but if you wanted, you could go with alloy rims, a French bottom bracket (velo orange has one that's a good piece), and modern drivetrain. If I had the money (probably ~200 depending on how you work it), I'd go that route.

And BTW, yellow Pugs seem to be rather hard to find. Hang on to that one, I let mine slip through (early '80's Shimano FFS 5 speed), and am STILL kicking myself about that.
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Old 06-18-10, 04:33 PM   #9
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you can fix this up for next to nothing (assuming everything works). a weekend with naval jelly, fine steel wool, and some wd40 will get everything sparkly again. you could find matching yellow touch up paint for the spots that need it bad (seatstays).

it might not need anything! i would try to use those tires and tubes. cables might be ok with a little lube, and chain might be fine with a cleaning/lube.
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Old 06-18-10, 04:36 PM   #10
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OP is way to pessimistic about this bike. The only major part you probably will have to replace is the shifters - the plastic ones tend to snap on the first shift after 20 years of disuse, but they might just work.

You mainly need some mild detergent in water, and some means of polishing up the (formerly) shiny bits. Just don't use steel wool or a steel brush, as this removes chrome and other plating. Brass/bronze wool or a rag and a big tub of Mother's billet polish.

If you're serious about removing rust, oxalic acid (deck bleach) works amazingly. Search these forums for more advice on using it than you can ever absorb.

You'll probably need new tires, brake pads (get some good quality ones, and braking will be decent, even if you keep the steel rims), and cables.

In all likelihood, if you lubricated all the pivots on the derailleurs with some oil and let it sit overnight, it might even shift properly without any other work.

The only things that will be difficult to do without special tools are getting inside the bottom bracket (where the crank spindle lives) to rebuild it in the case that the pedals turn roughly and getting the rust off the spoke protector. A bike shop can do this for you (edit: remove the freewheel so that you can drop the spoke protector in a bucket of oxalic acid), or find your local bicycle coop.

If you love this bike, buy it some dignified black cotton bar tape and a leather saddle.

Last edited by Roll-Monroe-Co; 06-18-10 at 04:39 PM.
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Old 06-18-10, 08:39 PM   #11
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Thank you so much, guys; this is great information.

I was certainly intimidated because it seemed like such a daunting project - I don't know the first thing about bicycle maintenance or repair and all the rust got me really worried. This bike has a lot of sentimental value, so there is absolutely no chance of getting rid of it or flipping it. I'm much more optimistic that the bike can be in ridable condition for almost nothing and in tippy top shape for a reasonable price if I'm savvy about my shopping. I'll be sure to post pictures of the progress if my buddy trusts me to get this thing rolling again!
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Old 06-19-10, 05:00 AM   #12
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Your Peugeot is anything but rough, in my opinion. The bicycle will amaze you as its former shine and glory present themselves with a little effort. Here is what some of my Peugeot UO8s have looked like and yours is comparable. Also, you might want to look at some of the how to stuff to learn a bit about bringing your yellow bike back to life. Nice bike and I hope you enjoy what it has to offer.
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