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Old 01-31-11, 09:24 PM   #1
e.maguran
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1970s Peugeot UO-8... PX-10? I have no idea... but I'm using it!

Hey all,

I've got a tasty one for you all. I've had this thing for about 15 years, but have never ridden it. It was in my neighbor's trash and up until being sponsored by company to do our local MS150, I didn't have a reason to rebuild it... I'm a trail rider.

Anyway, I'd like to know if any of you bike lords can decipher which model I have. It's quite light for a bike from the period. Unfortunately, with rebuilding the bike via REI, they had to replace all (with Shimano parts) the Simplex gearing because it just fell off the moment they touched it and I can't wait for Simplex parts from eBay as I have to start doing training rides.

Thanks!

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Old 01-31-11, 09:26 PM   #2
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More Photos!





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Old 01-31-11, 10:35 PM   #3
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Early 70's Peugeot U08.

These are common, but very nice rides. It appears to be in nice condition - Freebies from neighbor's trash are the best kind!

I would behoove you to make sure the Bottom Brkt, cables and hubs have been serviced 9at least) before you ride it. ALSO make sure that seat post isn't stuck, and then remove it and grease it up good before resetting it.

- You may also want to consider upgrading it with alloy rims. This is the ONE most significant thing you can do to reduce weight, improve ride quality and braking. Especially wet braking.
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Old 01-31-11, 10:37 PM   #4
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Looks exactly like a late 70s UO-8 with new deraillieurs. May not be a top bike but I'm sure you have found it rides great. A perfect first roady in my opinion.
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Old 01-31-11, 10:39 PM   #5
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PS - And make sure that you have adequate engagement with the steerer on the handlebar stem: It looks too high. (You ought to grease it too. )
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Old 01-31-11, 10:47 PM   #6
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^ Dangerously high.
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Old 01-31-11, 11:32 PM   #7
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After I posted this, I went to look online for any info on the bike and identification items. I checked the rims and they're 1975 rims. The decals and bike pump mounts are circa 1975-1977, so I'm okay with this.

Yes, I did take this for a ride after picking it up tonight and it was amazingly smooth! Only problem is the techs who worked on this beauty left before I got there, so I couldn't get sized up. I'll have to bring it back after work on Thursday to make it perfect.

The derailluers had to be upgraded due to the simplex items falling apart. They're Shimano Sora parts... and hopefully that's good?

As for **upgrades** -- I've toyed on the net and found some excellent pics of what I'd like to do... but I'm not sure if they'll work on this. I've read Sheldon Brown's guide to 70s French Bikes and they're idiosyncracies. I'd really like to upgrade to some lighter parts if possible:
1) Rims? auchencrow You said that alloys would be a nice upgrade? A coworker told me to look into 700C sizes... do you know of any companies that make compatible wheels for a 120mm Rear spacing? (I'm not sure that applies for spacing, but I had to note it)
2) Handlebars? I've seen some Easton EA70s on JensonUSA for a decent price. The idea of dropping the weight of the steel items catches my eye.

I really like these two photos:

Easton bars w/ stem

Cinelli bars w/ carbon fork


3) Shifting -- I asked my bike tech if I could upgrade my shifting ability from the downtube to the bars... or even to the new shifters in the brakes (on current models), but he said it wouldn't be worth the hassle.

4) Are hubs/gearing able to upgraded?
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Old 02-01-11, 12:27 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by e.maguran View Post
The derailluers had to be upgraded due to the simplex items falling apart. They're Shimano Sora parts... and hopefully that's good?
Yes, in the grand scheme of things. They will work better and last longer than the original Simplex derailleurs. Some will point out that similar results are available with period correct derailleurs, if period correctness is a consideration at all.

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1) Rims? auchencrow You said that alloys would be a nice upgrade? A coworker told me to look into 700C sizes... do you know of any companies that make compatible wheels for a 120mm Rear spacing? (I'm not sure that applies for spacing, but I had to note it)
Life may or may not be a little easier if you include 27" alloy rims in your search. Many of us have 27" alloy wheelsets, whether original or replacement, that we are perfectly satisifed with.

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2) Handlebars? I've seen some Easton EA70s on JensonUSA for a decent price. The idea of dropping the weight of the steel items catches my eye.
Don't rule out vintage handlebars (e.g from Ebay or the sale forum here). In fact depending on your stem, you might be constained to french sized handlebars. I'm not an expert on french sizing, so better get some expert input before you buy.

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3) Shifting -- I asked my bike tech if I could upgrade my shifting ability from the downtube to the bars... or even to the new shifters in the brakes (on current models), but he said it wouldn't be worth the hassle.
I tend to agree, but there are other schools of thought on preferred shifter design and location. You will get more C&V cred here if you stay with down tube original or period correct shifters, but don't let that interfere with your comfort and enjoyment of riding the bike if you prefer a different configuration.

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4) Are hubs/gearing able to upgraded?
Of course, but what are your goals?
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Old 02-01-11, 12:38 AM   #9
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Boy, e.maguran, you have a lot of probing questions. I’ll offer you my opinions.


Quote:
Originally Posted by e.maguran View Post
.....
The derailluers had to be upgraded due to the simplex items falling apart. They're Shimano Sora parts... and hopefully that's good?
I would recommend Suntour VxGT for this.

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.....
1) Rims? auchencrow You said that alloys would be a nice upgrade? A coworker told me to look into 700C sizes... do you know of any companies that make compatible wheels for a 120mm Rear spacing? (I'm not sure that applies for spacing, but I had to note it)
I think the Mafac brakes will reach the 700c’s on this frame, but I really believe that 700’s will only add expense for tires with no improvement in performance, and the built-wheels I’ve seen for sale usually do start at 126 O.L.D. (I am sure you could find vintage 120 - 700’s on eBay, but you’ll pay.)

IMO it makes much more sense to retain the existing hubs and just re-lace them with 27” alloy hoops (Araya’s/Weinmanns) and SS spokes. I believe Harris also sells some nice 27 rims. Then, get some Panaracer Paselas.

Some folks may argue that with 700c, you can select from many more tires: That is true enough, but it is also true that there are no better tires than the Paselas for this application, and they are readily available in 27 in varying widths – for less money.

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.....
2) Handlebars? I've seen some Easton EA70s on JensonUSA for a decent price. The idea of dropping the weight of the steel items catches my eye.
I am not familiar with the Eastons. I like Nitto Noodles (and so do many other people).

The problem is that you'll have to buy a new stem, and sand it down so it will insert into the fork steerer. Either that, or find a pair of FRENCH alloy handle bars. Be advised that weight wise, you won't notice the difference as you will with the wheels.

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.....
3) Shifting -- I asked my bike tech if I could upgrade my shifting ability from the downtube to the bars... or even to the new shifters in the brakes (on current models), but he said it wouldn't be worth the hassle.
You could go with Barcons on the bars.
But your mechanic is correct: Brifters are not worth the hassle – or the expense. They would cost more than the whole bike is worth and force you into major changes to conform with their indexing.

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.....
4) Are hubs/gearing able to upgraded?
I am pretty sure the bike has Maillard high flange hubs. I suppose there are better hubs, but again I think the cost outweighs the benefit. Plus, I think it is good to retain the vintage high flange aesthetic.

There are compact 6 speed Freewheels, but even these sometimes get you to fooling around with axle spacing. More gears than that gets you into bending frames and other complexities.

Hope this helps.
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Old 02-01-11, 12:01 PM   #10
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Looks exactly like a late 70s UO-8 with new deraillieurs. May not be a top bike but I'm sure you have found it rides great. A perfect first roady in my opinion.
...and in very nice shape for goin' on 40 years old! And when/if you "upgrade" to something more upscale, keep the UO, and throw on some fenders, lights, rack, etc - it'll make a GREAT town bike.

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Old 02-01-11, 12:14 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by e.maguran View Post
After I posted this, I went to look online for any info on the bike and identification items. I checked the rims and they're 1975 rims. The decals and bike pump mounts are circa 1975-1977, so I'm okay with this.

Yes, I did take this for a ride after picking it up tonight and it was amazingly smooth! Only problem is the techs who worked on this beauty left before I got there, so I couldn't get sized up. I'll have to bring it back after work on Thursday to make it perfect.

The derailluers had to be upgraded due to the simplex items falling apart. They're Shimano Sora parts... and hopefully that's good?

As for **upgrades** -- I've toyed on the net and found some excellent pics of what I'd like to do... but I'm not sure if they'll work on this. I've read Sheldon Brown's guide to 70s French Bikes and they're idiosyncracies. I'd really like to upgrade to some lighter parts if possible:
1) Rims? auchencrow You said that alloys would be a nice upgrade? A coworker told me to look into 700C sizes... do you know of any companies that make compatible wheels for a 120mm Rear spacing? (I'm not sure that applies for spacing, but I had to note it)
2) Handlebars? I've seen some Easton EA70s on JensonUSA for a decent price. The idea of dropping the weight of the steel items catches my eye.

I really like these two photos:

Easton bars w/ stem

Cinelli bars w/ carbon fork


3) Shifting -- I asked my bike tech if I could upgrade my shifting ability from the downtube to the bars... or even to the new shifters in the brakes (on current models), but he said it wouldn't be worth the hassle.

4) Are hubs/gearing able to upgraded?
Be careful you don't end up pouring too much effort and money on that UO8. It's a good bike for what it is, but there's a point of diminishing returns when you will not really feel the benefit of installing more modern/expensive components on the bike. You will be better off to just pass the bike on to another C&Ver who is looking for a UO8 and just get another bike that will have more of what you are now looking for. You will be more satisfied in the end and appreciate the bike that you get longer.

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Old 02-01-11, 12:20 PM   #12
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It's a nice bike, but don't go crazy with the upgrades.

If you're replacing the wheels, then I recommend 700c because there is a greater variety of tires available, especially at the high end.

I would replace ONLY the wheels. Everything else is fine. The new derailleurs are better than the originals. The originals are notorious for breaking or wearing out.

If you get the urge to spend more money, buy a better bike but keep this one. The better bike can also be a vintage bike but more worthy of expensive upgrades.

If you hang around here, you'll see that many of us have LOTS of bikes. I refurbish bikes as a hobby and make a little money on it. I have 40 or 50 bikes here in my home. There are about six I call my own. A bike for every season and purpose, plus some guest bikes and spares. If you hang around here long enough, you'll catch this bug from us.
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Old 02-01-11, 11:41 PM   #13
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Thanks for all the help guys!

I looked further at some stuff and this is what I've got on the bike:

- 1975 D.E.A. Super Chrome 27 x 1 1/4 wheels - Worth replacing? These things look brand new... and for my weight, it would probably be better if I just lose the weight around my gut first . I haven't ruled out this upgrade 100% yet.
- AVA Stem - Per Sheldon Brown, this is something I think I might need to replace for fear of it breaking under pressure. I'm 220lb... so it might be a problem.
- Norex 39 Leather seat that I plan to recondition with some Brooke's Proofide.

Besides getting the proofide dressing, I'll replace the pedals with either clips or clipless... I'm not sure which to get though as I'm fresh to the road thing, and get new handlebar grips (mine are very old and thin = wrist pain).

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If you hang around here, you'll see that many of us have LOTS of bikes. I refurbish bikes as a hobby and make a little money on it. I have 40 or 50 bikes here in my home. There are about six I call my own. A bike for every season and purpose, plus some guest bikes and spares. If you hang around here long enough, you'll catch this bug from us.
I actually own a lot of bikes... I used to recondition Schwinn "wheelie"/Banana seat bikes as a kid when i wasn't in the BMX craze. I want to say I have close to 18. My prized possessions are in my sig, but I know have some interesting stuff like the first Specialized, Mongoose BMX frames made, a Shelby (really my father's bike, but I had a hand in rebuilding it), and some other stuff I'll have to dig out of the attic some time. It's amazing what people will would sell at car swap meets for practically nothing

Last edited by e.maguran; 02-01-11 at 11:46 PM. Reason: Adding swagger
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Old 02-02-11, 07:12 AM   #14
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It's a nice bike, but don't go crazy with the upgrades.
+1. The best way to upgrade is to get a bike that doesn't need to be upgraded. Ride this one, get used to it, and think about ways to make it fit you better; is it exactly the right size, or would you be better off with something a little bigger, a little smaller, &c? Then start looking at Craigslist for other options. Since you have this one, you're not in a hurry; this puts you in an ideal position for buying a better one.
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Old 02-02-11, 09:33 AM   #15
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- 1975 D.E.A. Super Chrome 27 x 1 1/4 wheels - Worth replacing?

- AVA Stem -
Nice bike! It is similar to but not exactly like my (white) '72. Some thoughts:

Those are not the Rigida Chrolux rims which came on the UO-8 of the early 70's. Perhaps the UO-8 had been re-spec'ed by then. Those wheels look like the lower quality rim that came on the cheaper AO-8, though the AO-8 came with low-flange hubs and yours are high-flange like the UO-8's original hubs. Perhaps your wheels were re-strung at some time. In any case, 27" alloy rims and Pasela tires would be a good upgrade.

I can't say for sure but that looks like AO-8-quality crank and chainwheels too.

The stem does not look like the original AVA stem, but again, perhaps it was re-spec'ed or replaced. The AVA stem from the early 70's had a flat back surface, and the "death stem" was hollowed out on the back and had only one expander slot which was not drilled at the upper end. (My UO-8 has a flat surface, non-hollow, with two drill-terminated expander expander slots.) That looks like original (or original-style) bar tape. Don't know if the brake lever covers and hoods were originally black.

Back then or over the following decade an original owner might probably have replaced the derailleurs with one of the Suntour V series. Auchencrow's suggestion of the VxGT is good, or the VGT-Lux. If you want to lighten it further, consider a Sugino crank.

In any case, it is a nice-riding bike. Enjoy. That's a good find.
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Old 02-02-11, 09:45 AM   #16
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Nice find. I agree with re-lacing the hubs to some Alu. rims, and some stainless spokes. It'd be a good project for your first wheelbuild if that sort of thing has ever interested you. I just got into it myself with Roger Musson's fine book and Sheldon's instructions.

I would ride the current tires you have until they are worn out before you buy new ones, they look like they have a lot of life left in them.

How are your brake pads? You could probably benefit immensely from new ones, kool stops or maybe velo-orange has some of their pads that fit centrepull brakes for cheap? I was using kool-stop salmon canti pads with good results on similar brakes.

I wouldn't replace any of the sora stuff, this bike is fine as-is... there are nicer pugs out there if you want to restore one to period, I see very little to gain from taking apart a tuned and running bike just to put some old parts on it, just my two cents... unless you've got nicer free parts to swap in.
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Old 02-02-11, 01:44 PM   #17
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It's certainly satisfying to build your own wheels, but it rarely saves money. Pre-built wheels are surprisingly inexpensive.

I say that, and I still build my own wheels.
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Old 02-02-11, 02:19 PM   #18
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It's certainly satisfying to build your own wheels, but it rarely saves money. Pre-built wheels are surprisingly inexpensive.

I say that, and I still build my own wheels.
Only real sure advantage to building your own wheels is you are more certain about QC as you know how much care you might have taken to build them....but then you can mostly blame yourself if something goes wrong, unless there's a defect on the parts you used. So the warranty claim option will be hard to do if there is a problem.

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Old 02-02-11, 03:36 PM   #19
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It's quite light for a bike from the period.
I've had several UO8s from that era. Actually, this was not a light bike during that era, but it was one of the lighter entry level bikes. There is only so much you can do weight wise with steel rims, steel cottered crank, steel seat post, steel handlebars. I traded up from a Schwinn Continental to a UO8, seemed really light. But it wasn't. Can be upgraded relatively easily (addressing the heavy components and getting the weight down), except dealing with the french cottered crank (if you want to replace it) can get costly.

+1 Stem too high.
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Old 02-02-11, 03:49 PM   #20
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One other advantage to alloy rims is braking performance. I owned a UO8 in the late 60's early70's and wore the bearing out on the BB etc. Too young to understand it could be repaired so sold it with the sew-up rims. Got pics somewhere (slides).
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Old 02-02-11, 04:22 PM   #21
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Another nice thing about the UO-8 is that it rides better than other bikes in the same weight/price class of that era. I'd prefer it to the Raleigh Grand Prix, for example.
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Old 02-02-11, 04:40 PM   #22
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maguran - Hey - Great UO-8 - I think I have a GettoCal, That is a bumper sticker type decal that goes on the down tube left over from my last UO-8 refurb (not rebuild) - Message me your home address and I'll mail it to you when I find it - Its not an official Peugeot font and you may have to trim it down a little...

Also - I agree - This the UO-8s are surprisingly fast little bikes - Especially with new wheels - If you change out the crank you use a 5s-B spindle with loose balls and all will fit up just fine - I have had much difficulty finding seat posts for these bikes but have just bought a slightly over sized post and taken it over to the machine shop and had it turned to the proper fit - And by the way - There may not be a standard size for seat posts on UO-8s - Id there is I don't know it cause each one that I have worked was a little different... Have Fun...

Last edited by zandoval; 02-02-11 at 04:51 PM.
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Old 02-02-11, 04:44 PM   #23
SteveSGP
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Nice Peugeot.

I don't see many that still have the half hoods on the brake levers, Great find for a free bike.
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Old 02-02-11, 05:16 PM   #24
bloom87
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i would go single speed to drop weight on it...

remove the clunky f/r dérailleurs... replace with alloy wheels alloy everything steel... get an alloy crankset and change the bottom bracket...

you should have a sub-20 pounds bike in the end. (:

if there is a coop near your house you could do it in one night if you know what you are doing.... that is what I would do (:
conversions are so fun on old clunky low end peugeots !!!!!
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Old 02-02-11, 06:03 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by bloom87 View Post
i would go single speed to drop weight on it...

remove the clunky f/r dérailleurs... replace with alloy wheels alloy everything steel... get an alloy crankset and change the bottom bracket...

you should have a sub-20 pounds bike in the end. (:

if there is a coop near your house you could do it in one night if you know what you are doing.... that is what I would do (:
conversions are so fun on old clunky low end peugeots !!!!!
Heck if he goes that way, why not top it up with one of those new unpadded plastic Cinelli saddles too that seems popular with the SS/FG riders. I thik they look cool with the nice big Cinelli logos on them, but my butt might protest if I try them.... THEN he might possibly hit sub 20 pound weights.


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