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Old 02-03-11, 07:54 AM   #1
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Triple crank

Is a triple crank really needed for a bike that won't be used for any heavy "touring"? I'm paper building at this point my dream bike (separate thread as things progress) and I have most ideas figured out except the cranks. I was thinking something along the lines of TA cranks (like these) http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_C1XrRVl3W8...nk+3+small.jpg
I'm just not sure if I need a granny gear. Thoughts?
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Old 02-03-11, 07:59 AM   #2
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aslong as you are happy with the choice of gearing I don't see why you need a triple. that does look like a big step or step and a half between the rings.


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Old 02-03-11, 08:09 AM   #3
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Play with the gear calculator. I normally calculate everything in gear inches, which is common; I look for a range somewhere around 30 to 90. I'd suggest you figure out what gear range you need, and build your bike to suit that. Whether that means a double or triple crank does not, I think, really matter.
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Old 02-03-11, 08:31 AM   #4
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Thanks guys and girls for your input. I'm not planning on buying the VO cranks (although they are nice) because I am trying to keep this on a budget. A friend of mine has a machine shop in his garage and I think it would be quite cool to have my name on the crank arms. So my plan is to attempt to make my own cranks using the old TA s as a reference point. I'm just not sure about making rings....
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Old 02-03-11, 08:37 AM   #5
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aslong as you are happy with the choice of gearing I don't see why you need a triple. that does look like a big step or step and a half between the rings.
I'd call that a wide-range double. They work well with newer 8-10 speed cassettes with close gearing between cogs. The idea is that you can use the large ring most of the time, and only drop into the granny gear when it's absolutely needed.

The old "half-step + granny" triples solved the problem with 5-speed freewheels whose gears were widely spaced. The idea was that the half-step compensated for the wide spacing, allowing for 10 closely spaced gears (you had to use the FD a lot), with the granny gear only being used for really steep climbing. But half-step + granny is not needed with closely spaced cassettes/freewheels, so a wide-range (or compact) will do the trick.
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Old 02-03-11, 08:43 AM   #6
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Is a triple crank really needed for a bike that won't be used for any heavy "touring"? I'm paper building at this point my dream bike (separate thread as things progress) and I have most ideas figured out except the cranks. I was thinking something along the lines of TA cranks (like these) http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_C1XrRVl3W8...nk+3+small.jpg
I'm just not sure if I need a granny gear. Thoughts?
That looks like a compact double, triples are not always a lot lower then a compact double, the difference can be ½ gear inch or less. It all depends on the cassette or freewheel that your combining it with, on a dream bike, I would say go with a cassette hub, and make sure you have enough room for a large bottom cog, and not worry about the triple. You can use a gear calculator to make the choices easier.
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Old 02-03-11, 08:49 AM   #7
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I'd call that a wide-range double. They work well with newer 8-10 speed cassettes with close gearing between cogs. The idea is that you can use the large ring most of the time, and only drop into the granny gear when it's absolutely needed.

The old "half-step + granny" triples solved the problem with 5-speed freewheels whose gears were widely spaced. The idea was that the half-step compensated for the wide spacing, allowing for 10 closely spaced gears (you had to use the FD a lot), with the granny gear only being used for really steep climbing. But half-step + granny is not needed with closely spaced cassettes/freewheels, so a wide-range (or compact) will do the trick.
between rhm's, and this post, I think almost every consideration is covered. Personally, I have found a 34-48 double with a 9 speed cassette to give me all the gearing I need without significant gaps in gearing through the ranges I need most often.
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Old 02-03-11, 09:33 AM   #8
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I think as long as you pick the right derailleurs that can handle the chain wrap and can operate well with the large tooth difference between the chainrings its a great way to go.

I've got a 50-28 on my Super Course and the 1st Gen Cyclone derailleurs can handle the Chain Wrap but the FD doesn't shift the large tooth difference as elegantly as it does with a lesser difference.

I think though that on a bike you wanna ride all day long its a nice luxury to have 3 chainrings. Sure there's a lot of overlap with the gearing but sometimes its nice to just change the FD and get a slightly lazier range that's something other than Full on or Granny.
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Old 02-03-11, 10:14 AM   #9
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I'd say it depends upon where you live and/or plan to ride, plus your weight and whatever might be loaded on your bike.

Here in the mountains, a granny gear and a big bailout cog are always appreciated. But I'm a big guy, and it is not unusual to encounter some really steep climbs, even if they are short 100 yard long ones. There are several on C&V who feel this way. Better to have the gear when you need it, but rarely use it, than not have it at all. At least that is my philosophy, and I'm sticking to it!

Best of luck on your build. Can't wait to see your custom built crankset.
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Old 02-03-11, 10:25 AM   #10
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I'd say it depends upon where you live and/or plan to ride, plus your weight and whatever might be loaded on your bike.
Yeah. I ride a single speed on the flats, but once I went triple I'm never going back!

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Old 02-03-11, 10:32 AM   #11
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Of my many bikes, I only have one set up with a triple, and it's a half-step plus granny. On most of the other derailleur-equipped bikes, I really like old-school compact doubles: 46/32 is a combo I like a lot as I'll do most of my riding in the 46t ring, including the occasional hill we get around here.

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Old 02-03-11, 10:37 AM   #12
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Is a triple crank really needed for a bike that won't be used for any heavy "touring"? I'm paper building at this point my dream bike (separate thread as things progress) and I have most ideas figured out except the cranks. I was thinking something along the lines of TA cranks (like these) http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_C1XrRVl3W8...nk+3+small.jpg
I'm just not sure if I need a granny gear. Thoughts?
As at least one other has said, it depends on where you live and ride. In Florida or Kansas, 2 gears are overkill. Around here (east slope of the Cascades), or in the Rockies, too many gears is never enough. And one's build and climbing ability matter too: 5'8", 100lb, lungs the size of Texas? 53/42x11-19 should get you through the Alps just fine. At 6'3" and 185-190 lb, let's just say I'll never be a threat to Contador or the Schleck bros, so 46/28x12-28 is my default gearing. So the short answer is, you just gotta try a bunch of stuff and figure out what works for you. Simple, but not easy.

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Old 02-03-11, 02:24 PM   #13
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RHM hit it dead on.
I love a triple for loaded touring but short of that a compact double with a wide range rear more than does the trick in these parts. The TA crank is great since it's so versatile in gearing range, not to mention you can even run it as a triple or a double, or a single for that matter.

BTW to reinforce what Rudi said, I also go by gear inches and usually shoot for around 30-100. the 100 is just so I dont top out going down the hills around here. 30 is more than low enough for me for all conditions short of all day touring full loaded in the mountains.
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Old 02-03-11, 03:12 PM   #14
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I think a lot depends on the terrain you are riding. Most of my longer rides start with a 2500ft elevation gain in the first 15 miles. If I do this on standard gearing, I am usually heading back down at this point, instead of going down the other side of the ridge and committing to another 2500ft on the way back up. Compact cranks work well with a 9 or 10 speed cassette, but I feel a triple works better for a vintage bike.
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Old 02-03-11, 11:45 PM   #15
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I'd say it depends upon where you live and/or plan to ride.....Here in the mountains, a granny gear and a big bailout cog are always appreciated.
Every bike that I've built to use myself gets a triple crankset because of my driveway. Every ride I take ends with me coming up that blasted hill, and I'm grateful for the triple everytime.
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Old 02-04-11, 07:07 AM   #16
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I have one triple for riding in the mountains.
It's no heavier, and sometimes a long-cage RD is fun just because they seem so smooth.
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Old 02-04-11, 07:28 AM   #17
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I think though that on a bike you wanna ride all day long its a nice luxury to have 3 chainrings. Sure there's a lot of overlap with the gearing but sometimes its nice to just change the FD and get a slightly lazier range that's something other than Full on or Granny.
I have to admit, you make a good point here. Half-step gearing, with or without the granny gear, means a lot of shifting, double shifting, and mental energy expended on shifting. That's fine, I know we all intelligent people and up to the task of figuring out what gear to use. But then again, when I'm riding, I don't like to think about shifting. With three evenly spaced chain rings you don't use all your gears, but since you don't think about it, it's not an issue.
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Old 02-04-11, 07:39 AM   #18
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On a historical note, I have a copy of a 1975 Cycling review of a Norman Fay English tourer. It uses a TA cyclotouriste crankset with 44/28t chainrings and a 15-16-18-22-25 freewheel, which gives a gearing range of 30.2 to 84.8 inches. Yup, compact doubles are indeed C&V.

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Old 02-04-11, 09:29 AM   #19
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Having a high gear of only 85ish is ok with me. Someone may have mentioned this earlier, but for an all-day rider, Personally I'd rather gear it a bit on the low side and run out of cork on downhills and have to just sit and coast (not a negative in my eyes ) than end up walking up the next uphill.

I feel like a loser when I have to walk up part of a hill. I can only imagine how much worse that feeling would be if I were on a fancy carbo-tanium bike.
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Old 02-04-11, 10:34 AM   #20
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Having a high gear of only 85ish is ok with me. Someone may have mentioned this earlier, but for an all-day rider, Personally I'd rather gear it a bit on the low side and run out of cork on downhills and have to just sit and coast (not a negative in my eyes ) than end up walking up the next uphill.

I feel like a loser when I have to walk up part of a hill. I can only imagine how much worse that feeling would be if I were on a fancy carbo-tanium bike.
I've got lots of steep stuff, all around me. I have triples on all my bikes. I have never had to walk up a hill.
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Old 02-04-11, 11:28 AM   #21
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Yes but you are hardcore and I am but a puny girly-man with a 42T small ring.
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Old 02-04-11, 12:03 PM   #22
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Having a high gear of only 85ish is ok with me. Someone may have mentioned this earlier, but for an all-day rider, Personally I'd rather gear it a bit on the low side and run out of cork on downhills and have to just sit and coast (not a negative in my eyes ) than end up walking up the next uphill.

I feel like a loser when I have to walk up part of a hill. I can only imagine how much worse that feeling would be if I were on a fancy carbo-tanium bike.
The worst part of walking up a hill and feeling like a loser is trying to see through the tears as your going down the other side!

I think a set of TA knockoffs would fit the bill nicely. I'll just make sure that they can be swapped to a triple if needed (or not needed). On a related topic, any suggestions where to get 50.4mm chain rings? Or will I need to make chain rings? I think making rings will be tedious....
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Old 02-04-11, 12:43 PM   #23
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On a related topic, any suggestions where to get 50.4mm chain rings? Or will I need to make chain rings? I think making rings will be tedious....
Easy to find on eBay and I know several forum members have some available. Velo Orange will sell their 50.4 BCD CNC'd alloy rings at some point they've said.
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Old 02-04-11, 01:42 PM   #24
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The worst part of walking up a hill and feeling like a loser is trying to see through the tears as your going down the other side!

I think a set of TA knockoffs would fit the bill nicely. I'll just make sure that they can be swapped to a triple if needed (or not needed). On a related topic, any suggestions where to get 50.4mm chain rings? Or will I need to make chain rings? I think making rings will be tedious....
renehersebicycles.com sells new TA rings. I just bought a 46T outer (50.4BCD) for $45. I got tired of scouring ebay for them.
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Old 02-04-11, 01:49 PM   #25
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+1 to renehersebicycles.com I got mine there as well and I've dealt with those folks a few times now and have been consistently very happy with their customer service and helpfulness.
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