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  1. #1
    Senior Member Thumpic's Avatar
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    Is a die grinder too aggressive for polishing tasks on bicycles?

    like this one............

    die grinder.jpg
    Thumpic....

    Green is the new "CHEAP"

  2. #2
    lowlife bottom feeder BassNotBass's Avatar
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    It's one of the tools that I use for polishing metal.
    I plan on living forever... so far so good.

  3. #3
    Cottered Crank Amesja's Avatar
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    Depends on the attachment you are using I think. I use a Dremil sometimes. A larger die grinder is a bit heavy to hold after a while and not as easy to manipulate in tight spots as a tiny Dremil tool.
    '74 Raleigh Carlton Competition w/ Ultegra | '97 Trek 720 Singletrack CX-er w/ 105 | '64 Raleigh LTD-3 modernized w/ all alloy components |'69 Raleigh Twenty | '54 Raleigh Sports

  4. #4
    Senior Member rootboy's Avatar
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    Yes.

    Get a Dremel. Or, better yet, use compounds, polishes, and lots of rags n' elbow grease.

  5. #5
    Holy Spokes it's Batsman! Glennfordx4's Avatar
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    I think it would get to heavy to hold after awhile. I only use my Dremel tool to get hard to reach spots like around the spokes at the hub when polishing a wheel that is built up, anything else I do by hand. Being that my shop is uninsulated and unheated I spent all winter polishing bike parts in the house, some for my wifes bike, a few for mine & a bunch just because I had them. I went though two 5oz containers of Mothers Mag & Aluminum Polish and I am working on a third, my hands hurt lol.

    Glenn


    So Many Bikes Too Little Space

    RECYCLING = FIXING AN OLD BICYCLE

  6. #6
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    It would probably work well with a cotton buffing wheel mounted.

  7. #7
    Cottered Crank Amesja's Avatar
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    The nice thing about the dremel tool is all the attachments. The mini cotton wheels and tips work great with polishing or rubbing compounds and can be manipulated into tight spots on the frame or other parts. The big mongo-kit that they sell at Harbor Freight for $10-15 has every attachement known to man. I really like the rubber emery wheel for tough rust spots on chrome that OA can't get. You end up going through the chrome but at least you can buff/polish it back out and seal it back up. Better than a big black spot.
    '74 Raleigh Carlton Competition w/ Ultegra | '97 Trek 720 Singletrack CX-er w/ 105 | '64 Raleigh LTD-3 modernized w/ all alloy components |'69 Raleigh Twenty | '54 Raleigh Sports

  8. #8
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    If you buy a heavy duty electric grinder like that make sure you get a speed-dial with it. You will have to slow it way down for polishing. I used to use a big grinder like that for porting cylander heads, and then only for the initial "hogging out". It's a bit much for bike parts. I have used a small cotton buff on it for for polishing crank spiders and parts that are dangerous to do on a wheel. But I can't say it's a great tool for that.

  9. #9
    FBoD Member at Large khatfull's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
    Yes. Get a Dremel. Or, better yet, use compounds, polishes, and lots of rags n' elbow grease.
    We all know where I stand on the issue



    I do use some mechanical methods now just for expediency but all the above were done totally by hand.

  10. #10
    Senior Member rootboy's Avatar
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    That's beautiful. I'm a big proponent of hand work too. Glutton for punishment. Also, the Zen of it all....

  11. #11
    Senior Member
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    I'm in with the "elbow grease" set. Everything I've done so far has been accomplished with 4/0 wool, old toothbrushes, q-tips, old t-shirts and mag polish. Looks real nice to me.

  12. #12
    Senior Member rothenfield1's Avatar
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    I think grinders work great! I used one on my Bian**i, and it polished up real nice.
    Half of the time I fear I may not know what the hell Iím doing; the other half, Iím sure of it.

  13. #13
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    I use a bench grinder with buffing wheels impregnated with various types of polishing compounds.

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