Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: CCM 'Torino 76'

  1. #1
    Guest
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Grid Reference, SK
    My Bikes
    I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
    Posts
    3,769
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    CCM 'Torino 76'

    I mentioned in the CCM History thread (under my out-of-town pseudonym DCB0) that I was considering buying an old CCM Torino from the local bike guy. Well, I went and picked it up today, after we spent a few minutes ensuring that the BB, stem, and seatpost could be removed - they came out very easily, except for the crank bolt caps.

    I will post pictures in the next day or two of the 'as received' condition, and try to make regular updates as I decide what to do with it and ultimately bring it back into rideable condition.

    The bike
    THe bike is gold in colour with 'Torino 76' in black letters on the down tube, some black stipes and designs on the seat tube, and a CCM head badge riveted on the head tube. The crankset is a steel Sugino cotterless model, and there are some old steel pedals. The deraileurs are Suntour on the rear, and a Simplex piston styule front with a plastic body. The shifters are downtube mounted with a boss brazed on the frame that seems to be to keep the shifter clamp aligned. The cable guides clamped on the down tube near the BB, next to a boss similar to the one by the shifters.
    The rear wheel (front is missing) is a steel rim with a steel hub. The rim actually has 'Made in Canada' stamped on it, and it is a non-hook-bead type.
    The brakes are a super long reach Dia-Compe centre-pull model - so long reach that the pads are as high as they can go to fit with the 27" wheels. I think this makes the bike an ideal choice to convert to 700C.

    I believe the frame is made from 531 plain gauge tubing - judging by the 1970s CCM catalog posted on www.mytenspeeds.com, which shows an older model, but a Torino nonetheless.

    I will update soon with pictures and more build info.
    Last edited by LarDasse74; 05-10-11 at 07:57 PM. Reason: Correction

  2. #2
    Guest
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Grid Reference, SK
    My Bikes
    I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
    Posts
    3,769
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So i have been obsessing over the Torino 76 for a few weeks now. I did the first build pretty hastily, but with most of the major components I plan on using for the final build. I am still too lazy to take pictures - well, I might actually be ambitious enough at this very moment, but it is dark outside and the mosquitoes are pretty bad. I am sure I will have lost the motivation by early tomorrow.

    I have built the bike into a functional - but not ideal - 8 speed IGH touring/hybrid bike.

    I removed the original bottom bracket without any trouble - the past owner took pretty good care of it and had it maintained semi-regularly, and I don't think he used it in too much bad weather. I did a quick cleaning and regreasing of the threads and tried to screw in the Shimano sealed cartridge removed from my winter bike - the bearings feel like hell in a basket, but they still turn and have no play. I got the threads about 80% engaged before it got tight, as the Proud Canadian 1970s workmanship had left the unmitered end of the seat tube push about 1/4" past the threads into he bottom bracket shell. THe cups on the old bottom bracket were narrow enough to be fully inserted without hitting it, but the modern Shimano model wouldn't quite work. I used a dremel with a grinding wheel to remove almost all of the offending metal and had the bike shop pass the taps through to ensure everything was clean. On the second try I was able to thread the cups in all the way in and used the ratchet handle only for final torquing.

    I mounted the Exage 500LX crankset with 26-38-46 rings, intending only to use the heavily worn middle ring on the single cog on my Alfine hub. I measured the chainline of the Exage crank with a 122.5 bottom bracket and it was a perfect* match for the 19 tooth Shimano dished IGH cog. I have purchased a NOS 44 tooth chainring and 21 and 22 tooth cogs, and a new bottom bracket for use when I complete the final build.

    The original spacing was much too narrow for the 135mm wide Alfine so I did a basic cold setting using bare hands, a two-by-four that was laying behind my garage, and the string method of checking alignment. THe result was, once again, perfect*.

    I found a handlebar with the logos "North Road" and "SR" in the LBS junk pile. Brand new, with only a few scratches from kicking around for years, it is the type you might expect to see on turn of the century (1900s) bikes. These are slightly different than most 'North Road' handlebar I have seen - the ends of the bar come almost straight back, parallel to the wheels, and the logos are stamped so that the bar seems to be intended for use in the 'drop' position - so that's how I mounted them. These are also road diameter bars - 23.8mm grip area instead of 22.2, so I used the RX100 aero brake levers out of my spare partrs bin. The shop only had Celeste tape so that's what I initially installed, but I ordered in and have since installed some Cat Eye cloth tape and finished it with twine. My wife stopped making fun of it after I did this.
    THe only 22.2mm stem with a 25.4 clamp I had on hand was a dirty cheapo steel one, so that's what I use, but I wake up with night-sweats worrying that my SR North Road handlebars will be damaged by the clamp. I have the 8speed push/trigger Alfine shifter mounted vertically on the stem, which works well but I plan to buy a bar-end shifter for it. The stem is also a pretty short and the bike feels a little small - I like to stretch out on my bikes and I am quite a tall guy. I my LBS tried to get a 22.2 quill ->1 1/8 adapter but his supplier was out of stock. I will be ordering another one from somewhere else soon. I have a few threadless stems I can try to improve the fit.

    The saddle is the worst thing I have ever used. It is the type I think are common on 1970s ten speeds in Canada - sort of medium-narrow width, flat profile, thin soft padding, and a raised diamond/waffle pattern in the plastic cover. I have played with the angle for many rides and find it most comfortable (relatively) with the nose pointing significantly up. I believe the cheap-ass construction of this saddle, combined with my 260 lb girth, allow the plastic to form a sort of hammock for my gootch -albeit a very ill shaped and friggin uncomfortable hammock - and the skyward pointing nose allows my weight to balance in the wider part of the saddle. The original seatpost was too short by a bit. My 7 year old son was getting a little cramped on his bike, too, and we have the same seatpost diameter to I ordered a basic aliminum post, mounted it on my son's bike and took his slightly longer stock post for mine. I still have the home-made reflective stickers on the bike that he made at the Ottawa Velofest a few weeks ago.

    The tires are Schwalbe and Continental city tires - the rear is a 38c and the front is 32c, and that feels a little weird, but not unrideable. The brakes set up quick - they are the U-brake style common on old ten speeds, with cable quick-release levers built into the cable hangers on the headset and seat clamp. I have yet to install a rack or fenders, but I will be doing that soon. I also plan on a nicer saddle, and a JTek bar end shifter like I said. I am also trying to decide what tires I will get when the Schwalbe/Conti set wears out. I am trying to decide between a pair of kevlar bead Kenda Kwick Rollers at the LBS and Panaracer Pasela (possibly non Tour-Guard, although the tourguard will surely slow me down less than fixing a flat on the Alfine hub on the side of the highway).

    In conclusion, I still have not taken any pictures, but here is a picture I stole from an Auction for the same model of bike...

    Torino76.JPG

    Any comments on my plan or suggestions for parts are welcome. I hope my complete disregard for keeping the bike period correct does not disqualify me from posting here. Good day to you all.

    LASF

    Edit: *Perfect (a definition) I worked for years in the back of various bike shops trying to get every single detail to be 'perfect' in the eyes of the customer. I drove myself to distraction and eventually had to leave the business because I realized I eventually would have leaped over the counter and ripped a customer in two - probably for complaining that a fender doesn't look quite straight, or because the amount of cable I left after cutting off the excess was too short or too long, or because one brake lever moved 1/16th of an inch more than the other before the pads touch the rim, or some other such nonsense.
    So now I only work on my own and my family's bikes. Too many people spend hours using a dial gauge on their rims to get them straight, or making sure their tires are inflated to 115psi - not 113 or 117, but 115.00 psi. And what I see as perfect is: good enough that you can't tell the difference without inspecting it closely. If you can't feel it when riding then it doesn't matter.
    Last edited by LarDasse74; 07-19-11 at 10:15 PM.

  3. #3
    Guest
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Grid Reference, SK
    My Bikes
    I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
    Posts
    3,769
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So here are some pics I snapped this aft of the Torino 76.

    Torino76-04.jpgTorino76-02.jpgTorino76-03.jpg

    In the head-on pic you can also see my chocolate lab, Kay, looking for a place to relieve herself.

  4. #4
    Guest
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Grid Reference, SK
    My Bikes
    I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
    Posts
    3,769
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE

    A few weeks ago I finally got around to doing Assembly MkII on the Torino 76. I purchased a new chain, a nice shiny 44 tooth chainring and 22 tooth cog, and a 1-1/8 threadless stem and quill adapter.

    I noticed two things while doing the assembly:

    1. My bars are, in fact, 22.2 mm diameter which means I was able to mount the shifter in the, more conventional, 'handlebar' position.

    2. There was a rusty three inch long crack along the underside of the lower part of the NDS seatstay.

    I've never been the sort of guy who will leave well enough alone, so I have taken the opportunity to practice my oxy-acetylene brazing and do some frame repair.
    Most of the repair is already complete. I cut a 'diamond' shaped patch out of the seatstay of a donor bike and brazed it on. I needed to check the condition of the other tubes on the bike, so I took the opportunity to drill out holes in the down- and seat-tubes and add some ghetto internal cable routing. It turned out pretty good - perhaps even 'better than expected.'
    THere were a couple of hiccups, one of which may require another brazing project in a few weeks. :/

    THe only remaining things to do are paint and reassembly.
    Now to find the time...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •