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  1. #1
    Bianchi Goddess Bianchigirll's Avatar
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    Leaning Tower of Bianchis wood woorker help!!

    OK so it is not a tower but my homemade bike rack has a decided list to the right (as you are looking at it). the uprighton the left always leaned a bit, thanks to my fabulous skills . but the whole thing is leaning to the right now.

    I have a plan but since some of you are more adept at wood work I thought I would run it by you first before I spent alot of money on hardware.

    [I][I]coarse thread deckingtype screws were used in the initial construction.

    my current plan is to replace the screws on the 'mantle' (A) and lower cross bar with carrage bolts.

    then use a 1x3 on the back running from the upper right ( point B) to the bottom left (C)

    then use a spare 2x4 {just because I have it) running from upper left (point D) to midway on the right (point E) my available skill and tools prevent me from putting it lower. cross bar Z is the spare 2x4 for this.

    does this sound like a good idea? or should I hire someone who has more skill to fix/rebuild it?

    OH rats! I made a typo on the pic. Z is the board above the cross board the wheels are resting on, not the vertical one.

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    Bianchis '87 Sport SX, '90 Proto (2), '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '88 Trofeo SOLd, '86 Volpe, '89 Axis SOLD, '79 Mixte SOLD, '99 Mega Pro XL Ti SOLD, '97 Ti Megatube, , '90 something Vento 603,

    Others but still loved,; '80 RIGI, '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '86 Bertoni (sold), '09 Motobecane SS, '98 Hetchins M.O., '09 K2 Mainframe SOLD, '89 Trek 2000, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape

  2. #2
    Senior Member miamijim's Avatar
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    WWW.CYCLESPEUGEOT.COM 2005 Pinarello Dogma; 1991 Paramount PDG 70 Mtb; 1976? AD Vent Noir; 1989 LeMond Maillot Juane F&F; 1993? Basso GAP F&F; 1989 Terry Symmetry; 2003 Trek 4700 Mtb; 1983 Vitus 979

  3. #3
    Senior Member liquefied's Avatar
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    Find studs. Screw top piece into them. Get rid of the rest of that thing.

  4. #4
    Bianchi Goddess Bianchigirll's Avatar
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    that looks interesting. it mounts to the studs right?

    unfortunately for me these old walls are plaster/lathe and I highly doubt the studs are evenly spaced enough to find them.

    what is that and where do I get one? or two or three?
    Bianchis '87 Sport SX, '90 Proto (2), '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '88 Trofeo SOLd, '86 Volpe, '89 Axis SOLD, '79 Mixte SOLD, '99 Mega Pro XL Ti SOLD, '97 Ti Megatube, , '90 something Vento 603,

    Others but still loved,; '80 RIGI, '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '86 Bertoni (sold), '09 Motobecane SS, '98 Hetchins M.O., '09 K2 Mainframe SOLD, '89 Trek 2000, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape

  5. #5
    Senior Member katezila's Avatar
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    If not screwing into the walls is your problem I suggest this, http://****************/wp-content/up...kea-parts2.jpg It's a tension pole, no screws required, very firm.
    I've built one myself and it works nicely, but you won't be able to store vertically. Maybe you can use the tension poles to support/wedge the top plank?
    Cricket the '73 Schwinn Collegiate & Anastasia "DeathTrap" Thunderdash II the '83 Fuji Royale II Mixte

  6. #6
    Senior Member Alan Edwards's Avatar
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    I have been in construction for 23 years, and I know if you find a stud in a lath and plaster wall you can hang the world off of it. Old houses were built with thicker lumber, a 2X4 is 2" X 4" not 1 and 3/4 X 3 and 3/4 like today. find the studs and mark there location, predrill 1/8" or 3/16" holes and then use wood screws to secure the 2X4. After that put all the bike hooks up you want. When you move you take everything down and all you have to do is patch the holes.
    Totaly cheap wieght weenie. Totaly cheap bike snob. But I love Italian hand made stuff. 84' Ciocc, 85' Raleigh Super Course, 96' Sakae Litage, 2000 Lemond Maillot Jaune,
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  7. #7
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    First, a question........are you looking to straighten the rack up or merely keep it from leaning anymore?

    You can go to harbor freight and get an inexpensive stud finder tool. I got one there and it works pretty good for light duty projects.

    I'm sure there are studs in the wall, but at the very top of your wall there will be the top plate where the wall studs fasten and the top of the sheet rock fastens. You could tie into that.....finding it will be easier than finding the studs.....but, I can't tell if the top board of your rack is fastened above your rack "studs" or to the face of them. Looks like to the face.

    Anyway, there's also a tool called an angle finder that folds like scissors. If you're not looking to get everything square, simply cut some 2x4's to fashion diaganol supports and, using, 3" coarse thread drywall screws, toe them into to your verticle studs. Place the diagnol supports across the face of your vertical rack studs and mark where you want to secure the supports. Use the angle finder to get your angle and draw if off onto the supports. Cut'em right there and toe them in. This'd be easier than trying to get everything square.

    But, you really also need to secure the whole rack to the inner wall studs and/or top plate. That'll keep it from going anywhere. As well, you can get rid of your perpendicular supports coming out from the rack at the floor level. 3" coarse thread, drywall screws would be plenty good enough and you won't need the carriage bolts.
    Last edited by thook; 05-23-11 at 10:02 AM.

  8. #8
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    What Alan said.......predrilling is a very good idea. Keeps lumber from splitting with the drywall screws.

  9. #9
    Bianchi Goddess Bianchigirll's Avatar
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    Katezila; I have 4 racks similar to that one but this rack allows me store 10 bikes in the space those would allow 4

    to everyone else; holes in the wall are OUT! there is a clause in my lease about only 8 holes and I already used 6. if this were my house or a place with sheetrock walls I would have screwed a 2x6 to the wall long ago and been done with it.
    Bianchis '87 Sport SX, '90 Proto (2), '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '88 Trofeo SOLd, '86 Volpe, '89 Axis SOLD, '79 Mixte SOLD, '99 Mega Pro XL Ti SOLD, '97 Ti Megatube, , '90 something Vento 603,

    Others but still loved,; '80 RIGI, '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '86 Bertoni (sold), '09 Motobecane SS, '98 Hetchins M.O., '09 K2 Mainframe SOLD, '89 Trek 2000, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape

  10. #10
    @$#!?&!!$ junkfoodjunkie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Edwards View Post
    I have been in construction for 23 years, and I know if you find a stud in a lath and plaster wall you can hang the world off of it. Old houses were built with thicker lumber, a 2X4 is 2" X 4" not 1 and 3/4 X 3 and 3/4 like today. find the studs and mark there location, predrill 1/8" or 3/16" holes and then use wood screws to secure the 2X4. After that put all the bike hooks up you want. When you move you take everything down and all you have to do is patch the holes.
    +1
    Even with the house being old, the studs will most likely be on 16" center to center. Decide what height you want the bar and you can drill into the wall with a small bit to find the studs.
    Old walls are tough to tear down with sledge hammers and reciprocating saws, you should be able to hang as many 20-25lb bikes off of them as you want.

    Jake

    EDIT: I was posting the same time as you. Sorry you cannot drill into the wall.
    angle braces will most likely be your best bet now.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
    Katezila; I have 4 racks similar to that one but this rack allows me store 10 bikes in the space those would allow 4

    to everyone else; holes in the wall are OUT! there is a clause in my lease about only 8 holes and I already used 6. if this were my house or a place with sheetrock walls I would have screwed a 2x6 to the wall long ago and been done with it.
    OH!!!! Then, still......just cut you some diagonal supports. You could even just fasten them to the face of the verticle studs without having to cut the ends "custom like" with the angle finder. But, having them toe in will make it much stronger.

    *Do you understand what I mean by toeing them in?
    Last edited by thook; 05-23-11 at 10:17 AM.

  12. #12
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    Keep it simple. Remove the two lower center horizontals, center vertical and all you need is some more screws. (or possibly re-use what you pull out.)
    Place the horizontals diagonally. Adjust as length of the board allows.
    remove.JPG

    Edit: I see the horizontals are for keeping the wheel off the wall. Use additional lumber then. The triangles don't have to reach the floor. You can make them smaller.
    Last edited by Scrockern8r; 05-23-11 at 10:31 AM.
    - Solo Attack: When you attack, let the sprint group lead you out. You take no points. But when they sit up, you put your head down and hold threshold. Remember: When you see Jesus you are still about 2 minutes from blacking out. Hang on.

  13. #13
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    That is more or less what I was tryin' to say. But, I'll bet those two horizontals keep the tires/wheels off the wall....no?

  14. #14
    afraid of whales Mr IGH's Avatar
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    steel angle irons and drywall screws solve all problems!

  15. #15
    z90
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    Senior Member z90's Avatar
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    Triangles are your friend. Put a diagonal in there somewhere!

  16. #16
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    AH! I got it........

    Take a couple of 2x4's for diagonal supports.......just long enough to reach the span from the underside of your very top board and the top side of your second from top horizontal board at a diagonal angle........about *45.

    Take the bikes down.

    Take one of the 2x4's, place it across the face of the rack at a diag. spanning from the far left corner and reaching several inches past the second from left vertical stud. Mark where either end of the diag. board intersects on the horizontal boards. Keeping the diag. board in place, trace behind it with a pencil where the horizontal boards intersect. Cut either end of the diag board, screw it into your vertical boards where the diag. board crossed over them. Then toe the ends of the diag. board to your horizontal boards. Repeat this for the far right side of the rack........only have the diag. board travers in the opposite direction as with scrocker's image. No special tools needed, your rack won't lean anymore, and no holes in the wall.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Alan Edwards's Avatar
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    I'm sorry I did not know about your lease, when I used to rent I never told the land lord a thing. When I would move the house was in better shape then when I moved in. About your problem, some one suggested a diaginal struts set up in a "V" this is the perfect solution. Take off the load and staighten up the frame and then add the diaginal supports. Sorry about your land lord, I had one who thought hanging up my Ciocc on the wall made me a tree hugging communist.
    Totaly cheap wieght weenie. Totaly cheap bike snob. But I love Italian hand made stuff. 84' Ciocc, 85' Raleigh Super Course, 96' Sakae Litage, 2000 Lemond Maillot Jaune,
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  18. #18
    4.6692016090 retrofit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miamijim View Post

    Jim - Who manufactures that rack and where can I get one?

  19. #19
    Student of Hybrid Gearing BluesDaddy's Avatar
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    I think triangulating the rack will fix the problem as others have said. My suggestion is that you create the diagonal members by using two light steel cables with turnbuckles instead of cramming more lumber onto the rack. They look like this:

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    Senior Member due ruote's Avatar
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    The unit is free standing, right? Ie. not currently bolted to the wall? Here's what I'd do; it would take 5 minutes and about $1 worth of materials. Shove the whole unit left until it butts the left wall. Square it up. Take about a 4' length of 1 x 2, hold it against the top 2 x 4 so that it butts the right wall, and shoot 3 or so screws into it. All done.

  21. #21
    Curmudgeon in Training 20grit's Avatar
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    As others have said, you have nothing resisting moment in your design. There are many solutions as already explained by the others. You can introduce diagonals made from more framing, you could use cables and a turn buckle, or another one not mentioned thus far is simply making what is called a moment connection out of what you already have. Basically you have to make the connections much more rigid than they currently are. The easiest would be just add some more wood. I'd recommend turning some of your members so that you're adding more structural capacity perpendicular to the wall.

    If I were building one, given different length wheel bases and the like, I'd actually use a 2' wide strip of plywood where the loose wheels would rest (where the two 2x4 members are in bg's photo). This would provide more moment resistance if properly fastened and be more accommodating for bikes of different lengths.

  22. #22
    Senior Member KOBE's Avatar
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    You don't need to be a carpenter to figure this one out, Sell some bikes!

  23. #23
    Senior Member himespau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by due ruote View Post
    The unit is free standing, right? Ie. not currently bolted to the wall? Here's what I'd do; it would take 5 minutes and about $1 worth of materials. Shove the whole unit left until it butts the left wall. Square it up. Take about a 4' length of 1 x 2, hold it against the top 2 x 4 so that it butts the right wall, and shoot 3 or so screws into it. All done.
    +1, but get some old carpet squares (samples from stuff no longer in stock at a carpet showroom or cheap rugs?) and staple it to the end of the new 2x4 and to the top corner of your current piece so it doesn't scuff the wall.
    Punctuation is important. It's the difference between "I helped my uncle, Jack, off a horse" and "I helped my uncle Jack off a horse"


  24. #24
    Curmudgeon in Training 20grit's Avatar
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    This doesn't necessarily solve BG's problem, but it's just an idea for bike racks in general.


    I'd probably run something similar to that. The plywood can be ripped into (2) 24" sections, one used on the front for the wheels to land, the other used on the back. Both will serve to add moment resistance. The front gives the wheels a place to land while the one on the back will keep the stand off the wall a little and add more moment resistance. If one is still having problems, you could use the extra 2' off the end of the sheet of plywood at the top corners, but that really shouldn't be necessary. Ignore the 6'-0" measurements, i was just guessing at those trying to decide if one could pull this off using only 6' sections of 2x's.

    I can't vouch for that working as I've not built one, but it should. It already seems a bit over-engineered as it is, but you could put another 2x somewhere in the main framing if you wanted.

    The elevation shows the back two members the wrong way too, they should be flipped so we see the narrow edge. The section shows them how they should be.

  25. #25
    working on progress treebound's Avatar
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    We've got a 100+ year old house, plaster/lath, rough cut 2x4, not always evenly spaced, with occasional surprises (like hidden doors where a previous owner just plastered over a doorway). Those tension poles don't always work well, sometimes the plaster cracks and the lath gives way.

    Either on this site or another one someone used garage door rails hung along the ceiling with roller'd hooks to hang the bikes from. I believe someone sells the setup through one of the local bike shops here. Depending upon how wide your space is you might be able to suspend a beam across the room supported by 2D tripods against each side wall. Then you could use the roller track system or just screw hooks into the beam.

    Too many variables to do remotely, and too far away to do locally, so you'll have to use your imagination.

    Go to a local dry cleaners and look at their floating hangers to get some ideas.

    Or just get some ladders and rest a pole across them and rack the bikes by their saddle noses like is seen at triathlon events. Totally portable, no holes, and instead of having all the bikes on the back wall you could have them racked in front of the left and right walls with an aisle down the middle. Keepers to the left, transient flippers to the right.

    Sorry in advance if this post just adds confusion.
    Last edited by treebound; 05-23-11 at 12:41 PM. Reason: Monday eye'd typos

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