Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    2,538
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Does it matter how far you spread the drops on the rear of one of those old cruisers?

    I've got an old SS that I was told(previously repainted) is a Murray hanging in the storage unit. I've also got a set of aluminum MTB wheels with 9 speed set-up that would make the bike lighter and more versatile. Would it be safe to spread it far enough to fit those wheels? MTB spacing is 135mm. Otherwise maybe I could re-lace the rim onto a 9sp road hub if 135mm is too far but 130mm would be OK. It would probably make a really cool little 1x9 town cruiser/grocery getter if I can figure out the crank situation.

    If it helps answer the question at all, my bike looks pretty much like this, but without the tank or racks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member RobbieTunes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    15,658
    Mentioned
    49 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    You spread her that far, she'll complain for sure, and probably rub somewhere.

    Going from what is likely 120 or 126 to 135 is a Lot. Even going to 130 from 120 is a stretch. (I can't escape the puns)
    However, it's an older bike and may work. Most likely, if it does, you'll have chain rubbing on the outer cog.

    Try to guage the clearance, then trial and error is your friend. It's steel, she'll recover. Maybe even be grateful.

    Robbie ♪♫♪...☻

    I'm not a doctor, but I watch them on TV.

    1982 Lotus Classique
    1987 D'Arienzo (Basso) SLX
    1995 Hot Tubes TT
    2006 Cinelli XLR8R-2
    2008 BMC Roadracer SL01
    2014 Wraith Hustle
    2014 Wraith Paycheck

  3. #3
    Bianchi Goddess Bianchigirll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Camp Hill, PA
    My Bikes
    Too many to list here check my signature.
    Posts
    20,699
    Mentioned
    47 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    if you want to make it a multispeed, I would go IGH. if you just want to lighten it up, look at Niagara or Bike Island for alloy cruiser wheels. how are you going to attach the RD?


    don't forget, once you spread the rear triangle you have to make sure the frame is now straight and the dropouts parrellel.
    Bianchis '87 Sport SX, '90 Proto, '90 Campione del Fausto Giamondi Specialisma Italiano Mundo, '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '86 Volpe, '97 Ti Megatube, , '90 something Vento 603,

    Others but still loved,; '80 RIGI, '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '09 Motobecane SS, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape

  4. #4
    Holy Spokes it's Batsman! Glennfordx4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    South Jersey
    My Bikes
    Too many Bicycles to list
    Posts
    1,550
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you are using a QR hub I don't think it will work out to well, if you get a solid Axle though I would try it using a hanger claw for the RD. The trick is opening both sides up evenly a little at a time. If you have a one piece crank you can either get a square taper BB adapter and use a 3 piece crank or rob a one piece triple crank from a cheap MTB. I have a old Royce Union 3sp frame that I want to put a 7spd MTB wheelset in some day and don't see why I couldn't make it work. If you know someone at a LBS that can help set it up so everything is square when you are done spreading it that would be the ticket.

    Most likely it has 110 or 120 spacing stock.

    Glenn


    So Many Bikes Too Little Space

    RECYCLING = FIXING AN OLD BICYCLE

  5. #5
    Senior Member clasher's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Kitchener, ONT
    Posts
    1,515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If it's 120 going to 135 isn't really much of a stretch... 7.5mm each side isn't a huge amount, not much more than a 1/4". I doubt the dropouts and frame were made to very high tolerances anyway.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    2,538
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
    if you want to make it a multispeed, I would go IGH. if you just want to lighten it up, look at Niagara or Bike Island for alloy cruiser wheels. how are you going to attach the RD?
    I was thinking of using an old SA 3sp hub I have and building it with the MTB rims as lighter wheels for it, but I know she has at least one pretty good hill and she's not a strong rider yet. This bike would be basically getting her to start riding(A Peugeot mixte I upgraded didn't end up being a good fit for her). I was gonna use a claw to hang the RD. Hopefully alloy wheels, bars, stem, and seat post will lighten this thing up and the gears will make it so she can use it without having to struggle on hills.
    Quote Originally Posted by Glennfordx4 View Post
    If you have a one piece crank you can either get a square taper BB adapter and use a 3 piece crank or rob a one piece triple crank from a cheap MTB.
    I didn't know cheap MTBs had those. Thanks. I know some BMX bikes did, but they seem to be hard to find. And I actually just found a shop that I'd love to take the bike to to have the drop outs aligned, etc. I took a bike there for something but didn't end up having it done, but I think it's the best shop I've ever found. The guy seemed awesome and really nice. I'd love to give them some business.
    Quote Originally Posted by clasher View Post
    If it's 120 going to 135 isn't really much of a stretch... 7.5mm each side isn't a huge amount, not much more than a 1/4". I doubt the dropouts and frame were made to very high tolerances anyway.
    That's what I was thinking. And this old thing is definitely a sturdy build. Pretty sure I could drop a grenade on it and it would be fine. I just wanted to double check here before I went bending anything.

  7. #7
    Bianchi Goddess Bianchigirll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Camp Hill, PA
    My Bikes
    Too many to list here check my signature.
    Posts
    20,699
    Mentioned
    47 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I was thinking more along the lines of a 7 or 8spd IGH

    this sounds like a huge undertaking. have you considered cable routing and how to afix them to the frame? sounds like you may have zip ties everywhere when you get done. maybe a 8spd Nexus with a coaster brake is the to go.

    have oyu considered finding a nice MTB and putting slicks and tighter cassette on it?
    Bianchis '87 Sport SX, '90 Proto, '90 Campione del Fausto Giamondi Specialisma Italiano Mundo, '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '86 Volpe, '97 Ti Megatube, , '90 something Vento 603,

    Others but still loved,; '80 RIGI, '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '09 Motobecane SS, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape

  8. #8
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Wilkes-Barre, PA
    My Bikes
    Many
    Posts
    7,481
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you haven't taken it apart yet, you probably don't realize how heavy that frame is. Lighter wheels wouldn't hurt on this bike, but the bare frame and crank will already weigh more than many complete road or mountain bikes.
    Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

    People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.
    - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  9. #9
    rhm
    rhm is online now
    multimodal commuter rhm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NJ, NYC, LI
    My Bikes
    1940s Fothergill, 1948 Raleigh Record Ace, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1972 Fuji Finest, 1983 Trek 720, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...
    Posts
    12,710
    Mentioned
    60 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Bending the stays apart to make room for the wheel is probably okay, but when you're done you have to make sure the dropouts are perfectly parallel, which will probably mean bending them both back a bit. Bike shops have a tool for checking this; you might want to have them do the job. Parallel dropouts are really important if you're going to use an internally geared hub, otherwise you'll have terrible shifting. Any hub, IGH or otherwise, is guaranteed to suffer uneven cone wear and probably a broken axle before very long.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    2,538
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
    I was thinking more along the lines of a 7 or 8spd IGH

    Have you considered finding a nice MTB and putting slicks and tighter cassette on it?
    I figured you meant a IGH with more gears, but I don't really have $100 to spend on a hub for this and she may end up deciding she doesn't want to ride it much anyway. I have considered the MTB route, which I may end up going with. Maybe I'll think on this some more before I go ahead with anything.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Pearland, Texas
    My Bikes
    Cannondale, Trek, Raleigh, Santana
    Posts
    5,718
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    3speed, Is this a coaster brake bike? I think they're closer to 115 mm.

    Brad

  12. #12
    PanGalacticGargleBlaster Zaphod Beeblebrox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Smugglers Notch, Vermont
    My Bikes
    Upright and Recumbent....too many to list, mostly Vintage.
    Posts
    7,488
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by clasher View Post
    If it's 120 going to 135 isn't really much of a stretch... 7.5mm each side isn't a huge amount, not much more than a 1/4". I doubt the dropouts and frame were made to very high tolerances anyway.
    +1 and honestly if its just a slap-together and ride kinda thing I wouldn't even bother trying to set the rear. Just use some caveman strength and muscle the wheel in. It'll snap right back to whatever it was when you take the wheel out.

    If you're gonna do a 1x9 be sure to get your chainline nice and centered up on the 4/5 gear so you get OK chainline throughout the range.
    --Don't Panic.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •