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Old 11-19-04, 11:08 AM   #1
USAZorro
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How Do You Store Your Bicycles?

Winter is approaching here in Pennsylvania, and I'm finding that I have 6-7 more bikes than I did last winter, and the additions are ones I actually care about keeping nice. I can fit them all in the shed (barely), which will keep them out of the elements, but there is no temperature control.

Not only am I interested in learning how best to store them, but I am interested in learning how others organize their bicycles. I don't have much space, and I don't have piles of money laying around, but I can still dream.

What have you found that works? Photos might be useful tools here.

No snide remarks from you guys who live where people would be wearing parkas when it gets down to 50 please.
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Old 11-19-04, 12:10 PM   #2
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I store my bikes in an unheated garage with fresh oil on
the chain, a spray of WD-40 on the chrome and derailers.
Next year I'll add hanging them to get the tires off the
ground.

When I get them out next spring they get a bath and new oil
on the chain along with WD-40 for the derailers.

Works for me.
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Old 11-19-04, 12:17 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USAZorro
No snide remarks from you guys who live where people would be wearing parkas when it gets down to 50 please.
Hey -- I resemble that remark...
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Old 11-19-04, 01:41 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mswantak
Hey -- I resemble that remark...
I was thinking of you specifically when I made it.

I'm trying to come up with both practical tips - like tightwad's - and a long-term strategy for storing the 6-10 bicycles I imagine myself having for years to come. There are also some specific questions I have that I was hoping would get answered.

What is best tire inflation for prolonged storage?

Is it better to keep the tires off the ground?

What do people do to reduce the amount of floorspace their bicycles take up?

How does otherguy store his hundreds of bicycles?

If I can beg, borrow or steal a couple more useful ideas, I think I can save money and headaches through the coming years.
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Old 11-19-04, 01:59 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USAZorro

What do people do to reduce the amount of floorspace their bicycles take up?
Hang em from the ceiling.Start in garage,then fill basement,then go to work on living space. Attic, and crawl spaces are tough to get em in and out of.
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Old 11-19-04, 02:33 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USAZorro
Winter is approaching here in Pennsylvania, and I'm finding that I have 6-7 more bikes than I did last winter, and the additions are ones I actually care about keeping nice. I can fit them all in the shed (barely), which will keep them out of the elements, but there is no temperature control.

Not only am I interested in learning how best to store them, but I am interested in learning how others organize their bicycles. I don't have much space, and I don't have piles of money laying around, but I can still dream.

What have you found that works? Photos might be useful tools here.

No snide remarks from you guys who live where people would be wearing parkas when it gets down to 50 please.
Some observations. . .

I have noticed Bicycles stored for decades in a "dry" Basement to survive well(no rust). The Basement is underground therefore the tempetature is constant.

I have also noticed the tires dry-rotting and the bearing grease drying to a paste.

Maybe a light oil would be better than grease if the Bicycle is to be stored for a long time? The grease drying has ocurred with White and Brown colored greases; although the exact type of grease is unknown.

Stuck Stems, Seatposts and Bottom Brackets are a problem. I am currently using Never Seize on all my Stems, Seatposts and Bottom Brackets; any thoughts?
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Old 11-19-04, 07:50 PM   #7
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Hang them from a ceiling beam on those big, vinyl-covered bike hooks. Alternate between handlebars up and handlebars down, and you save some space between the bikes. Make sure they are clean when you put them away, and clean and lube and all that when you take them out for the spring.

Alternately, you can take the wheels off and hang them separately from the frames. Kind of a pain, though.
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Old 11-19-04, 08:47 PM   #8
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I truly appreciate your suggestions. Please keep 'em coming.

Sorry if I'm sounding dense here, but it occurs to me that there are several possible ways to hang bicycles. Is one way any better than the others? Hang by single wheel? (this would seem to be potentially unstable) Hang by two wheels? Hang by top bar of frame? (Sorry to be gender non-neutral, but I only have mens' models)

I'm still hoping that someone with a slick arrangement will post pictures.
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Old 11-19-04, 08:59 PM   #9
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<cockamamy theory>Put `em anywhere heated and populated with beings that can love them like the amazing creatures that they are. Living room, family room, hallway to the rear porch, upstairs bathroom, kids' closet, guest room (who visits but the in-laws anyway?). When you run outta room, hook `em on the wall over the plasma screen so you can peer at their mechanical loveliness while watching American Chopper.

And when the house is full up, then and only then should they be stored in the garage. Such a lonely place out there, amongst the greezy wrenches and clapped out `87 Toyota Corolla....</cockamamy theory>
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Old 11-19-04, 09:36 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USAZorro
What have you found that works? Photos might be useful tools here.
A full photo gallery of how we suspend 3 tandems and four 1/2 bikes from the garage ceiling are here:
http://home.att.net/~mark.livingood/garage.html

I've also used the free-standing racks that press against the ceiling for support for in-door storage when I lived in an apartment many moons ago.
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Old 11-19-04, 10:18 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USAZorro

Sorry if I'm sounding dense here, but it occurs to me that there are several possible ways to hang bicycles. Is one way any better than the others? Hang by single wheel? (this would seem to be potentially unstable) Hang by two wheels?
Both work.
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Old 11-20-04, 07:46 PM   #12
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I hang each bike unsidedown in the garage, with a rafter-mounted vinyl-coated bicycle hook on each wheel.
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Old 11-22-04, 10:05 AM   #13
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My bicycles are stored like Velogirl suggests. They hang by a wheel, from vinyl vovered bicycle hooks in joists of the basement ceiling. I alternate hanging by the front and rear wheels make more efficient use of space.

Some people do not like hanging from the front wheel as they feel this causes stress on the headset, While this is true, the stress has not been great enough to cause any problems with the headsets. Also, I have yet to have a front wheel disengage from the fork, causing the bicycle to fall to the floor. Potential for this problem is eliminated by hanging from the rear wheel, if it has horizontal dropouts, but if you use handlebars which are wider than the typical 16" (45cm) joist spacing, then you cannot hang one bicycle per joist.
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Old 11-22-04, 12:55 PM   #14
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If my bike couldn't tolerate 20 or 30 pounds of stress on the headset, I think I'd be afraid to ride it.
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Old 11-22-04, 01:52 PM   #15
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I'm trying to visualize what would happen to the ones hung by the rear wheels. Would you strap the front rim to the downtube to prevent the wheel from flopping over and causing havoc with the neighboring bicycles?
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Old 11-22-04, 04:41 PM   #16
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I hang them by hooking the front of the saddle over a pipe. The pipe hangs about 1' below the ceiling in my shed.
They hang with the front down about 20 degrees. I put them on alternating left & right, and then they pack in really tight, about 9" of pipe per bike. You can still get any one down without disturbing its neighbours.
I've got another pipe parallel with spare wheels hanging on S hooks. People seem to give me old wheels rather than dump them. Some are wonderful vintage racing wheels, deserving preservation.

Make sure the pipe is hung on strong chain up over roof beams........ 'cos the weight adds up.

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Old 11-22-04, 04:44 PM   #17
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I just put it in my living room when im not riding it or its not on the trainer.
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Old 11-22-04, 04:49 PM   #18
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I have an unheated shed attached to my garage where I store 7 bicycles, 4 directly on the (wooden decking) floor, the other 3 by their top tubes via 2 vinyl covered brackets apiece. Where I live in Colorado it often gets below 0 degrees (Fahrenheit) and I haven't yet (in 8 years) had any problems with tires or anything else. I also use synthetic grease as it does not harden over time.
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Old 11-22-04, 08:53 PM   #19
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You can also screw a rubber bike hook up high into a wall stud, then hook the bike's rear or front wheel over the hook so the bike "stands out" from the wall. Per the attached picture, notice the red hook at the top holding the back wheel.
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Old 11-23-04, 06:44 PM   #20
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I'm not looking to close down the thread, but the forum's been so slow today, I figured I'd post my thanks to everyone who has contributed to my ongoing education, and turn the light bulb back on at the same time.

Thanksgiving isn't until Thursday, and here we all are in a tryptophan-like coma. It isn't like this is the over-50 board.
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Old 11-24-04, 02:05 PM   #21
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All the boards will be over-50 for me soon enough...
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Old 11-25-04, 09:22 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mswantak
If my bike couldn't tolerate 20 or 30 pounds of stress on the headset, I think I'd be afraid to ride it.
I agree with you. However, the dissenters argue that a headset is designed for for loading along the axis of the steering column, not 72-73 off this axis (i.e. horizontal). In truth, the bearings are loaded at a diagonal to the steering axis (not sure what angle) so there is both horizontal and vertical loading. Also, the horizontal loading of the headset during braking would exceed any you get from hanging by the front wheel.

However, if you want you want to be purist in terms of tire and bearing preservation, I guess the best solution is to hang the bicycle by the top tube, or stem and saddle.
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Old 11-25-04, 11:21 AM   #23
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...and remove the headset bearings and seal them in a jar of grease.
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Old 11-25-04, 04:42 PM   #24
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My favorite bke is on my trainer in the basement with my winter project. My winter bike is in the hall waiting for me. The other 4 are in the kids club house sprayed down with w-40 leaning against each other keepin worm.
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Old 11-26-04, 02:13 AM   #25
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Hanging them from the wheels with the big rubber coated hooks work great... unless you have hydraulic brakes... you get airlocks which are no fun... so i sleep with my bikes... i ride mine every day, so i dont have to worry about the tires getting ****ed up.
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