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Old 07-06-12, 07:21 PM   #551
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Just say Bee-Ohhh-Pahh-Chey. BioPace! eeetsa Eeetalian!

And that's an '87. A well loved (and lovable) '87.
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Old 07-07-12, 12:41 PM   #552
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Raleigh 82' I believe
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Old 07-07-12, 01:57 PM   #553
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'83 Miyata 310. Second owner.
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Old 07-07-12, 03:37 PM   #554
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New Project(s)

So I finally borrowed a camera... Sadly my main ride (83 Voyageur) is stuck at work. But here's my current project bike:

85 Fuji Sundance- frame was repainted by a prior owner, but they did a decent job of it. They had some very bad "city" handlebars on it, I converted it to my bars of choice (Trekking Bars), and changed out some previously installed low-end Tektro brakes for some nice Shimano cantilevers.

The seat on it currently is my wife's seat of choice, since I (was) building it up for her. Still haven't wrapped the bars, as I'm playing with the positioning at the moment. Ideally, I think I'm going to change this to a 3 speed IGH rear, as the chainrings/cranks aren't original to begin with.



The wheels on it right now are 26x1.5 with a 5 speed rear, but I was lucky enough to pick up a set of Campagnolo 26x1" wheels with Deore XT hubs (6 speed) for $5(!) at a garage sale a few weeks ago. I'm going back and forth between the two sets, can't decide which I like better.

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Old 07-08-12, 06:58 AM   #555
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My wife's family is visiting us from Bayern in a few weeks.

I have been prepping a few bicycles for them to use.

Here's a late 1980's Giubilato I cleaned and serviced for them to use.

Just needs new skins.





....and not one bit vintage, but I also arranged for them to use a couple of a buddy's Ducatis while they are here.

Both are the same model as this one at the Nature Valley Grand Prix.

They usually ride BMWs, of course, but I think they'll survive.


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Old 07-08-12, 07:47 AM   #556
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My $500 pair of his and hers rolling early 600 generations:













It's surprisingly fun to get out and clank around on old iron. The whir of arabesque is intoxicating, I can't imagine what an entire peleton of that would sound like.
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Old 07-09-12, 12:00 AM   #557
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New Member, 83 Sanwa 700, tall.

Hi all, I am new to the forum. I am not sure if this is the right place for me just yet, you all have such nice vintage bikes. I seem to be more into a resto-mod kinda thing. This is my 1983 Sanwa 700. All chromoly, tange #2 double butted tubing. 69cm (27 inch) frame. As my username implies, I am a bit of a clydesdale, at 6'7" and 230lbs. I am worried the tange #2 tubing is going to wilt under the pressure, but giving a good go..

The Sanwa is surprisingly good. I picked it up on craigslist for $90. I bought it for the frame only, thinking I would strip everything, but the old parts are really of such high quality its hard to get rid of them. Suntour componants, sugino cranks... really an impressive bike. The original wheels spun much better than the current 700c wheels I had ready to go on it. Granted my newer wheels are not "good", but I was surprised how significantly better the 30 year old wheels were. I currently have a Shimano Nexus 7 internal hub laced to a 700c rear wheel (and 35c tire). I like the hub quite a bit, but am considering putting a single cog on the old wheel to make single speed, just so I can use the older nice wheel.

Anyhow, I seem to be able to ramble on about this bike and that is why I am looking to join a forum. Hopefully you all will be more interested than my so far very patient wife.

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Old 07-09-12, 12:17 AM   #558
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My $500 pair of his and hers rolling early 600 generations:













It's surprisingly fun to get out and clank around on old iron. The whir of arabesque is intoxicating, I can't imagine what an entire peleton of that would sound like.
Those are some beautiful bikes... the 600 groups you have on the Trek is second generation and the later 600 rear derailleur is functionally superior to the first generation Arabesque which sets itself apart from later 600 groups by the lovely scroll work on the parts.

I am a fan of all the 600 groups and the one exception is that first generation rear derailleur which lacks some modern features like a b screw adjustment and it has a very weak spring so it does not have as good a service life as it's later counterparts but when it works it works beautifully. The Arabesque crank is a gem and I have a full group here waiting for something.
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Old 07-09-12, 12:20 AM   #559
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Hi all, I am new to the forum. I am not sure if this is the right place for me just yet, you all have such nice vintage bikes. I seem to be more into a resto-mod kinda thing. This is my 1983 Sanwa 700. All chromoly, tange #2 double butted tubing. 69cm (27 inch) frame. As my username implies, I am a bit of a clydesdale, at 6'7" and 230lbs. I am worried the tange #2 tubing is going to wilt under the pressure, but giving a good go..

The Sanwa is surprisingly good. I picked it up on craigslist for $90. I bought it for the frame only, thinking I would strip everything, but the old parts are really of such high quality its hard to get rid of them. Suntour componants, sugino cranks... really an impressive bike. The original wheels spun much better than the current 700c wheels I had ready to go on it. Granted my newer wheels are not "good", but I was surprised how significantly better the 30 year old wheels were. I currently have a Shimano Nexus 7 internal hub laced to a 700c rear wheel (and 35c tire). I like the hub quite a bit, but am considering putting a single cog on the old wheel to make single speed, just so I can use the older nice wheel.

Anyhow, I seem to be able to ramble on about this bike and that is why I am looking to join a forum. Hopefully you all will be more interested than my so far very patient wife.

Lovely bicycle and if the builders did their job and understood that anyone riding a 27 inch frame would probably tip the scales at 200 pounds plus, it should be a very solidly built bicycle and there is nothing wrong with Tange 2 and this may have been used to give the bike more strength as it is a heavier tube set than Tange 1 and was often used on mountain bikes.

Looking at the picture it appears that the front fork might have been tweaked a little and it might be a good idea to have someone check that it is still true... a bigger rider will pout a lot of extra stress on the front wheel and fork and impacts that might not affect a smaller rider may manifest when the rider is bigger.

When we build oversized frames we also build much stronger forks and build our front hubs (we make these ourselves) to handle greater riding and braking loads... whereas a normal front hub has double cartridge bearings a hub for someone your size would probably be a triple bearing hub although at your height and weight you probably look quite thin.

With much longer frame and head tubes these also get extra work and the tubing selection is done to ensure stiffness and strength.

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Old 07-09-12, 12:31 AM   #560
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'83 Miyata 310. Second owner.
Beauty...

The 310 does not get as much love as it deserves as it is a really fine bicycle and Miyata's entry level models were superior to most of their contemporaries mid level offerings.
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Old 07-09-12, 10:10 AM   #561
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Just say Bee-Ohhh-Pahh-Chey. BioPace! eeetsa Eeetalian!
Heh. Maybe I should replace it with a Race Face crankset so I can say "RAH-chey FAH-chey" in front of my mountain biking buddies.
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Old 07-09-12, 03:18 PM   #562
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'83 Miyata 310. Second owner.
Your bike is very nice, it looks showroom quality in those pics. I am also struck by how similar it is to my Sanwa --further evidence, I think, of Sanwa being made by Miyata. I know Sanwa was the name of given to japanese bikes imported to minnisota, and I have heard Sanwa's were made by Univega. I have also heard Univegas were made by Miyata. I am not sure on the Japanese corporate hierarchy, but am struck by the similarity of the builds. Here is a shot of seattube as an example.

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Old 07-09-12, 04:18 PM   #563
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1981 Trek 710

Replaced stem and handle bars with Nitto Technomic and Nitto Noodle. Added Nitto Mark's rack and SKS fenders and my brooks b17 standard.

I have yet to get a real picture of it, but this iPhone picture captures it nicely.
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Old 07-09-12, 05:11 PM   #564
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Those are some beautiful bikes... the 600 groups you have on the Trek is second generation and the later 600 rear derailleur is functionally superior to the first generation Arabesque which sets itself apart from later 600 groups by the lovely scroll work on the parts.

I am a fan of all the 600 groups and the one exception is that first generation rear derailleur which lacks some modern features like a b screw adjustment and it has a very weak spring so it does not have as good a service life as it's later counterparts but when it works it works beautifully. The Arabesque crank is a gem and I have a full group here waiting for something.
Thank you. They took some work to get like this, but it's been worth it. I've really come to remember why I love wrenching so much. This bike hobby of mine has taken up the time [and money] in the evening I used to spend in a bar. At least now I have something to show for it other than a hangover.

Somehow I've become a 600/ultegra collector this year, on top of these two I have the stowe with full tricolor and a mountain cycle with full 6500. One of these days I'll break into the 10speed groups and I'll be on my way to collecting them all.
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Old 07-09-12, 05:19 PM   #565
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'83 Miyata 310. Second owner.
This is one of the best looking big bikes I've ever seen. Often larger frames look so gangly and oddly proportioned, but this one just works. The lines are so svelte.

I'll excuse the swapped brakes if you hunt down some leather toe straps.
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Old 07-09-12, 08:44 PM   #566
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I seem to be lusting after US builders these days, relatively obscure ones at that...


First is a Bernie Mikkelsen 1982 Road Special. Bernie's been building in the SFO Bay area for a few decades now, had some health issues a couple of years ago but is back at the torch again.

Next is an approximately '80 Ron Stout Road, 650b conversion a'la Riv. Ron built for a little over a decade in Salt Lake City, total output a bit over 500 frames. This '80 is pretty and cleanly built, but not particularly distinctive. Serial number is 008, must be an early frame, he later switched to an xxxyy format with xxx the consecutive frame # and yy the year built.

The '92 Ron Stout Road was late in his career, not long before he stopped building, serial 46692, so his 466th frame, built in '92. He had been using a massive monostay for quite a few years at that point, gave him lots of canvas to sign. I think Newlands/DiNucci at Strawberry were doing this before Stout, but maybe their design was a little more elegant and less massive. Stout's has way more metal than necessary below the brake hole, which limits tire size a bit.

Edit: I guess the file sizes were biggish, you'll need to click on the pics to embiggen.
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File Type: jpg Mikkelsen, Bernie - 1982 Road Special - 01.jpg (93.2 KB, 734 views)
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File Type: jpg Stout, Ron - 1992 Road - 01.jpg (90.6 KB, 729 views)
File Type: jpg Stout, Ron - 1992 Road - 03.jpg (82.4 KB, 53 views)

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Old 07-09-12, 09:44 PM   #567
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This is one of the best looking big bikes I've ever seen. Often larger frames look so gangly and oddly proportioned, but this one just works. The lines are so svelte.

I'll excuse the swapped brakes if you hunt down some leather toe straps.

Thanks, it is well proportioned isn't it? Yeah, the original dia compe levers' quick release springs were shot making it flop down after every use. Plus they had that cheapo recycled pop can feel to the aluminum. I found these pantographed gran comps on c-list for $15. It actually did come with leather straps for the lapize toe clips. They're in great shape, I'm just still getting used to the clips themselves and having the straps also on there in the city is too much.

Here's a few photos from when I first got it. I know it was original but all that red had to go, after nearly thirty years it was all a different shade.






And I can't resist putting a couple of after cleaning shots of the golden arrow group





Everything is more polished now, I need to take some more close-ups. And find a crappier bike I won't mind riding in the rain!
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Old 07-09-12, 09:49 PM   #568
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Your bike is very nice, it looks showroom quality in those pics. I am also struck by how similar it is to my Sanwa --further evidence, I think, of Sanwa being made by Miyata. I know Sanwa was the name of given to japanese bikes imported to minnisota, and I have heard Sanwa's were made by Univega. I have also heard Univegas were made by Miyata. I am not sure on the Japanese corporate hierarchy, but am struck by the similarity of the builds. Here is a shot of seattube as an example.

Thanks, but it just looks showroom in the photos cause you can't see the scratches here and there. I'm don't know about Miyata manufacturing for Sanwa. The scoops on top of your seat stays look just like mine but I'm not sure how common they were in the 80's.
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Old 07-09-12, 09:57 PM   #569
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Beauty...

The 310 does not get as much love as it deserves as it is a really fine bicycle and Miyata's entry level models were superior to most of their contemporaries mid level offerings.
Thanks. I pretty much started from zero bike knowledge a few months ago. When I saw the ad for this and did my research it seemed as though Miyata was as you said, a company whose entry level models were of decent quality.

I think I've done a decent job of changing it from stock without making it look stupid. Learning how to wrap cotton tape was especially fun and challenging.
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Old 07-11-12, 11:13 AM   #570
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Hi everyone, first post here. Picked up a 1974 Varsity * gasp! * on the cheap thanks to CL. Only thing it absolutely needed, well, besides a bath and scrubbing was tires/tubes. Here is how it sits as of a couple days ago:



I found a cheap alloy three-piece crankset and bottom bracket adapter thing for only $25 that will hopefully be going on the bike this weekend. New saddle at some point too. Other than those things I will definitely replace the rims at some point but for now the steel wheels will stay.

Anyone have an alloy Continental fork or stem they're willing to sell? I'd like to get rid of the steel pieces currently on my bike if I can.

Thanks!

Jeff
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Old 07-11-12, 12:16 PM   #571
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I seem to be lusting after US builders these days, relatively obscure ones at that...


First is a Bernie Mikkelsen 1982 Road Special. Bernie's been building in the SFO Bay area for a few decades now, had some health issues a couple of years ago but is back at the torch again.

Next is an approximately '80 Ron Stout Road, 650b conversion a'la Riv. Ron built for a little over a decade in Salt Lake City, total output a bit over 500 frames. This '80 is pretty and cleanly built, but not particularly distinctive. Serial number is 008, must be an early frame, he later switched to an xxxyy format with xxx the consecutive frame # and yy the year built.

The '92 Ron Stout Road was late in his career, not long before he stopped building, serial 46692, so his 466th frame, built in '92. He had been using a massive monostay for quite a few years at that point, gave him lots of canvas to sign. I think Newlands/DiNucci at Strawberry were doing this before Stout, but maybe their design was a little more elegant and less massive. Stout's has way more metal than necessary below the brake hole, which limits tire size a bit.

Edit: I guess the file sizes were biggish, you'll need to click on the pics to embiggen.
Nice.

Like them all.

They look like real mile eaters and you'll arrive looking very classy.





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Old 07-12-12, 09:07 PM   #572
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Thanks! I like 'em clean, smooth, comfy and fast...

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Nice.

Like them all.

They look like real mile eaters and you'll arrive looking very classy.





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Old 07-16-12, 06:35 PM   #573
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I seem to be lusting after US builders these days, relatively obscure ones at that...

Next is an approximately '80 Ron Stout Road, 650b conversion a'la Riv. Ron built for a little over a decade in Salt Lake City, total output a bit over 500 frames. This '80 is pretty and cleanly built, but not particularly distinctive. Serial number is 008, must be an early frame, he later switched to an xxxyy format with xxx the consecutive frame # and yy the year built.

The '92 Ron Stout Road was late in his career, not long before he stopped building, serial 46692, so his 466th frame, built in '92. He had been using a massive monostay for quite a few years at that point, gave him lots of canvas to sign. I think Newlands/DiNucci at Strawberry were doing this before Stout, but maybe their design was a little more elegant and less massive. Stout's has way more metal than necessary below the brake hole, which limits tire size a bit.
Thank you for posting your Stouts, first time I have seen anyone else post one here. . Mine is number 94, built in 1981. It is my favorite road bike and I would love to find another in my size.



No pics yet, but I am now working on building up a Allan Wanta frameset (Santa Barbara CA). Anyone else have one of his works?
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Old 07-16-12, 08:52 PM   #574
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Thank you for posting your Stouts, first time I have seen anyone else post one here. . Mine is number 94, built in 1981. It is my favorite road bike and I would love to find another in my size.



No pics yet, but I am now working on building up a Allan Wanta frameset (Santa Barbara CA). Anyone else have one of his works?
Oooh, very cool! Mind if I ask your serial number? Somebody on the CR list has/had a tall #9281, which sounds like just a couple of frames before yours.

That's pix of 3 different frames with 3 different seatstay treatments. Your seatlug/stay junction looks similar to the cover of a late brochure Stout once published. I'll attach a couple/few pages.

I just missed a Wanta on ebay a few years back, haven't really hunted for one since then. He's been building for a lot years know...
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File Type: jpg Stout, Ron - Catalog 02.jpg (99.9 KB, 14 views)
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File Type: jpg Stout, Ron - Catalog 07.jpg (98.4 KB, 13 views)
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Old 07-17-12, 06:14 PM   #575
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1972 Super Sport conversion. It has been posted in other places, but now complete with decals. Now that is has a couple months of miles on it the next step is to upgrade the cranks. I apologize for the horrible light in most of these shots.

I would highly recommend this set up for an around town bike. It is loads of cheap fun.







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