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Old 09-22-11, 11:27 AM   #1
pants2422
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Requesting advice regarding a 'vintage' bike purchase

Hello,
I'm in the market for a road bike. I came across this bike here online, and am asking the bikeforums community if this a good purchase decision for me.

I have a mountain bike and am looking for more speed. I am 6'1" and here's the information I was given in an e-mail to the seller:

it is 25 inches from the crank center to seattube top

I am new to this, so I'm not entirely sure what the lingo means. Any input would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you
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Old 09-22-11, 11:35 AM   #2
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Nice bike.
If you have real long legs you might be able to ride it.

http://veloweb.ca/bike-fit/

http://www.bgcycles.com/fitting.html
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Old 09-22-11, 11:38 AM   #3
pants2422
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I've seen some websites talk about in-seam measurements; I don't know too much about that, just that my length for most pants is 32/32" (I don't wear baggy pants)
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Old 09-22-11, 11:42 AM   #4
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Read this:
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/frame-sizing.html

The length of your legs are going to be a lot more important than your total height, especially with a mountain bike. I'm 6'3", but I mostly ride women's frames because I'm all torso.

The general rule of thumb is to have a "fistful" (4-6 inches) of exposed seat tube when the height is adjusted correctly. Put your heel on a pedal in its lowest position and straighten your leg. Adjust the seat to meet your butt. When you pedal you'll have the ball of your foot on the pedal: This will give you a full range of motion without fully extending your leg. If you're new to cycling, this is going to seem way too high, but you'll find it makes riding a lot more comfortable. You may need to lean the bike over to put your feet on the ground at stops.
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Old 09-22-11, 12:45 PM   #5
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It is on the tall side for you. You will not be able to have both feet flat on the ground straddling the top tube; which typically takes 8 to 9" less between the crank center line to the top of the seat tube than your trouser inseam. For example; my trousers are 31" inseam, and a 22" or 23" works well for me. Anything larger, and it would not be possible to have the bike straight when stopped off the seat with my feet flat on the ground.
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Old 09-22-11, 12:57 PM   #6
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The bicycle is too big for you. Have a look at this Does It Fit article I published a while ago. It might help you understand a wee bit about how to figure out if a vintage bicycle will fit you properly.

My youngest grandson took one look at this Cambio Rino and wanted to take it out for a ride. He had no idea that the bicycle was too big for him. Sadly, this situation manifests itself with adults, me being one at the beginning of my interests in old bikes, quite often...


I should add that the boy did not realize that my slippers did not fit him well, either:-)
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Old 09-22-11, 01:12 PM   #7
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Pant inseam does not equal bicycle inseam. Do a little google search, I would be surprised if your bicycle inseam isn't quite a bit more than 32 inches, maybe 34 inches. You need to figure out what size you need first, then pounce on a deal in your size. A good deal on a bike the wrong size is a bad deal.

That bike ad you attached is quite large, I would be surprised if it fit you.
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Old 09-22-11, 01:50 PM   #8
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I'm 6' tall with nearly half of my height (35.5") in my leg length, and a 25" center-to-top frame would be too big for me. 24" (61cm) frames fit me well.

Use this table as a rough guide for traditional geometry frame sizing.

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Old 09-22-11, 02:45 PM   #9
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I loved my super le tour 12.2, but the ding in the tt bugged me too much. Still regret giving it away.
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Old 09-22-11, 04:14 PM   #10
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Thanks to everyone that replied.

Let me recap:
After measuring, my bike inseam is close to 34".
For a comfortable fit, there should be 4-6" of seat tube visible when adjusted.
The top tube should be less than my bike inseam to avoid discomfort (as well as dangerous accidents in areas!).
I am assuming the crank center is the apparatus containing the pedals and chains.
Therefore, the bike advertised with a 35" standover height is too big for me to ride.
I don't entirely understand why I need to know the distance from the crank center to the seat tube top.

Is this correct? If so, what would be the ideal bike specs for a guy like me?
Once again, many thanks to all of you.
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Old 09-22-11, 05:38 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pants2422 View Post
Thanks to everyone that replied.

Let me recap:
After measuring, my bike inseam is close to 34".
For a comfortable fit, there should be 4-6" of seat tube visible when adjusted.
The top tube should be less than my bike inseam to avoid discomfort (as well as dangerous accidents in areas!).
I am assuming the crank center is the apparatus containing the pedals and chains.
Therefore, the bike advertised with a 35" standover height is too big for me to ride.
I don't entirely understand why I need to know the distance from the crank center to the seat tube top.

Is this correct? If so, what would be the ideal bike specs for a guy like me?
Once again, many thanks to all of you.
The reason you need to know the distance from the crank center to the seat tube top is because that is how frame sizes are specified by manufacturers who use the "center-to-top", or c-t-t (sometimes c-t) method of specifying frame size. There are other manufacturers who use the distance from the crank center to the intersection of the centerlines of the seat tube and the top tube. This is called the "center-to-center", or c-t-c (sometimes c-c) method of frame measurement. To further complicate things, some manufacturers measure the frame size of a frame with a sloping top tube using a "theoretical" horizontal top tube and size the frame by where a horizontal top tube would intersect the seat tube.

Schwinn uses the center-to-top method, so when a seller says it's a Schwinn 24" or 61cm frame, you know what size he's talking about.

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