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Old 10-01-11, 05:22 AM   #1
FortuneCookie
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What type of bottom bracket cover? What type of tool.

Can anyone tell me what this type of cover is called? I have found a few name for it myself whilst trying to remove and re-install it but none of them a suitable for public use. I really want to know primarily because I want to find a tool to remove and replace it. I refuse to accept that a professional bike mechanic would use a slippery adjustable spanner or start hitting it with a hammer. I would like to be able to service the bottom bracket as needed without damaging anything. Sorry if this is an obvious question, but again I come to you after a long a fruitless Internet search. Thank you.
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Old 10-01-11, 05:32 AM   #2
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That is a drive side bottom bracket cup or bearing race. There is a special tool for removing the piece but I do not have one. And, I have removed lots of these guys, during Bottom Bracket Rebuilds, using an adjustable wrench, which is quite effective is done properly...


Don't just grab an adjustable and get at it. Take the time to look through the article and ensure you understand what you are doing.

Hope this is a help.
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Old 10-01-11, 05:46 AM   #3
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http://www.ebay.com/itm/PARK-BIKE-HC...a#ht_670wt_905
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Old 10-01-11, 07:33 AM   #4
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That is an excellent answer. Thank you so much. You told me about your site before but it slipped my mind whilst looking for this. I have learned my lesson and will always take a look at your site in the future.
Can you tell me just how stiff this component can be when screwing it back on? I know it can be difficult to remove but is it normal for it to be extremely tight when putting it back on or does this just mean the threads are dirty? I am having trouble getting it tight enough to stop excessive wobble and wondered how much to force it.
Thanks again.
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Old 10-01-11, 07:35 AM   #5
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Oh sorry, did not see your answer Marley Mission. Another great answer. Thank you.
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Old 10-01-11, 07:39 AM   #6
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Oh sorry, did not see your answer Marley Mission. Another great answer. Thank you.
no problem - be careful - "n+1" addiction can happen w tools too - but randy has the goods on the job as well

as for tightening issue - i am assuming you are using the lockring ring / tool the right way?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_nDB...eature=related

in this video - @ around 1:10 he shows how to hold the cup in place while tightening the ring so as to hold the cup in place after you have tightened it to where it spins smoothly w no play

btw - its a job best done with the arms off

make sure your fixed cup is tight

and even if you do it right - there are times when there can be issues
in particular some folks have had difficult w fixed cups loosening during use and subsequently used locktite to prevent this from happening)
i also have had this problem and i had to replace the cups

let us know how it goes

Last edited by marley mission; 10-01-11 at 08:00 AM.
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Old 10-01-11, 09:58 AM   #7
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I will gather all the required bits and bobs and give it a go. May take a while though as I need some bearings, grease etc. I will report back. Thank you.
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Old 10-01-11, 10:24 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by FortuneCookie View Post
That is an excellent answer. Thank you so much. You told me about your site before but it slipped my mind whilst looking for this. I have learned my lesson and will always take a look at your site in the future.
Can you tell me just how stiff this component can be when screwing it back on? I know it can be difficult to remove but is it normal for it to be extremely tight when putting it back on or does this just mean the threads are dirty? I am having trouble getting it tight enough to stop excessive wobble and wondered how much to force it.
Thanks again.
Both of my cups (Campy NR on a Raleigh frame) screw in pretty easily. I would clean the threads, etc. on yours. One great tip which I got WRT threads a long time ago was to start them backwards, by hand, until you feel a click (which is the thread dropping into the starting place). Then start screwing it in by hand the correct direction. If it is going in tight, I always worry that I am cross-threading it. It all depends on how much clearance (I guess is the term) the threading is cut with. Some threading is intended to be an interference fit, so will be tight. I wouldn't guess this would be used on a bottom bracket, or most bicycle parts.
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Old 10-01-11, 07:38 PM   #9
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This is the tool I use:



http://www.bikesmithdesign.com/BBTool/index.html
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Old 10-02-11, 01:20 AM   #10
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haha - cool tool - i've almost pulled the trigger on that one before
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Old 10-03-11, 04:18 PM   #11
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Have not reassembled the bottom bracket yet but I have cleaned the threads using some of this forum’s tips and now the cover goes on really easy. I can screw it in all the way just using my fingers. It took swearing and sweat to move it before. I will endeavour to keep it as clean as possible in the future. I made a tool like ranyjawa’s and it worked a treat to loosen it when it was dirty. At least now I know what I am dealing with here. I will get back to you when the job is done. I am really grateful for the advice.
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Old 12-10-11, 08:37 AM   #12
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Well, I doubt if anyone was holding his or her breath waiting for me to finish this, but I thought I would report back. I finished this job some time ago and as far as I can tell it was all good in the end. I don't have anyone around me that knows stuff about bikes and my LBS is not so local so I rely on the Internet for most of my info.
When I was researching how to do this job, I was amused/distressed to see this page on Wikibooks about bottom brackets. http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Bicycles/Maintenance_and_Repair/Bottom_Brackets/Bottom_bracket_overhaul
Under ‘Repairs’ it gloomily states “….most amateur attempts will fail.”
This seems unnecessarily pessimistic to me. I am not very intelligent. You could say I failed many times when trying to fix this, but I have finally done it, and now I know how to do it. I am glad this article did not put me off. In fact I have newfound confidence to fix other stuff on the bike. If I take it easy and read up on stuff carefully I doubt that I will do any lasting damage to the bike, so why not give it a go?
Thanks to everyone who contributes to this forum.
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Old 12-10-11, 10:22 AM   #13
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I'm a bit late finding this thread, but lacking the proper Park tool, a cone wrench (16mm IIRC) will work. Like the Park tool it's also thin enough to get in behind the crankarm for fine adjustments to the bearing preload, without having to remove the crankarm.
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Old 12-10-11, 12:48 PM   #14
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That's the spirit. Keep goin'. You're already way past the chimps that assemble bikes at X-mart!
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Old 12-10-11, 03:11 PM   #15
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I was amused/distressed to see this page on Wikibooks about bottom brackets. http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Bicycle...acket_overhaul
Under ‘Repairs’ it gloomily states “….most amateur attempts will fail.”
I can honestly say that I have never failed to get a drive side BB cup out using my amateur method, nor have it damaged any bottom brackets using the method. I must also say, that it does not work on some Raleigh bottom brackets.
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Old 12-14-11, 12:21 PM   #16
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Thanks everyone. Yes, your method was very useful randyjawa. I will keep your invention in my bike tool box for future use. I also used the shop bought spanner, so that to all those who pointed me in that direction.
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