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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    '89 66cm Cannondale 3.0, '92 22" Cannondale M2000, '92 JxL Cannondale R1000 Tandem, '86 Cannondale ST800 27" (68.5cm) Touring bike w/Superbe Pro components and Phil Wood hubs.
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    Epic vintage touring bikes (Cannondale defined BOBish?)

    I stumble onto epic amazing bikes a lot. More than my fair share actually, probably due to living in cycling obsessed places (Madison, Boulder, etc.). However, it isn't often that I ever stumble across something I can actually enjoy. I ride between a 68cm and a 70cm bike, and while 27" (~68cm) steel bikes are ubiquitous from Raleigh, Schwinn, Panasonic, Fuji, etc. I never ever find anything that actually works for me. Large triangles and the tubing used for flexy vintage lightweights (even the best stuff) does not build good bikes. It just doesn't. Maybe, you'd have to be 6'6" and use 205mm custom cranks to realize this, but I'm just gonna ask that you trust me on this one.

    Anyway, my grail finds are vintage Cannondale ST bikes, which were actually built in a 27" (68.5cm) size. Just epic bikes. Think a randonneur or Rivendell. While not the series 3.0 frames, the ST series while "unoptimized" (if that's a word) are still magical. Even with front and rear racks, fenders, large tires, and triple bottle cages they still climb like a mountain goat, sprint like a jack rabbit, and are phenomenally light, and freakin' incredibly strong. The lugged steel Tange touring forks are just perfect for these aluminum frames, and I don't know why they just are.

    The '86 & '87 ST800 spec was just mind blowing. As I've posted elsewhere just a Grant wetdream:

    Honey Brooks (or Honey Ideal) saddles with copper rivets
    Suntour Superbe Pro triple front derailleur
    Suntour Superbe Pro rear derailleur w/GT Long cage (only place this exists)
    Suntour Supere Pro seatpost ('87 had American Classic)
    Suntour Superbe Pro pedals w/clips and Cannondale leather straps to match saddle
    Suntour Superbe Pro indexing downtube shifters (transformed by Kelly Take-Offs)
    Dia-Compe NGC 982 cantilevers actually in black (rare as hen's teeth)
    Nitto Technomic stem (1" quill)
    Nitto Randonneur bars
    Cinelli honey leather bar tape to match saddle/straps
    Stronglight Delta 1" threaded/quill headset
    Sansin hubs w/Wolber 58 Super Champions
    Sugino AT crankset 28/44/48 half-step
    Sugino BB
    Light touring tires w/Kevlar belt (this is in '86/'87 keep in mind)
    Fenders spec'd and frame fits wide tires
    Front and Rear Racks
    Triple Water bottle cages

    The Anthracite metallic paint is just epically beautiful with the tan/gold C'dale badging. You actually have to see one of these to appreciate 'em as photos don't do them justice. C'Dale actually painted the front and rear racks AND the three water bottle cages to match in Anthracite. Just jaw droppingly hauntingly beautiful.

    You have to actually see the bike to appreciate it, just the way the whole comes together just so:

    http://66.147.244.179/~vintagm8/year/1987/1987.pdf

    Keep in mind this is in '86. This bike is spec'd and being manufactured long before Grant becomes "Grant." It is hard for many to believe that the Bridgestone/BOBish/Rivendell descends from a Cannondale vision, but its true. Cannondale's very vision started with bicycle touring. Don't believe everything you read. Perhaps there is a reason that one of the tenants of that cult being "steel is real" lies in the history that their vision first belonged to a bunch of folks building aluminum bikes in Pennsylvania.

    Cannondale started in '73 as a company that made gear for Backpacking and "BicyclePacking." Some of the early vintage imagry of the bicycle tourists using their Cannondale Bikepack Touring system of handlebar, saddle, front and rear panniers, look uncomfortably like the imagery that you'll find today on the Rivendell website that crafts Grant's brand. You've got to actually look through these early catalogs and advertising while having the Riv site up to actually appreciate how similar these companies were/are.

    Link to 1973 Cannondale Backpacking and BikePacking catalog:

    http://66.147.244.179/~vintagm8/year/1973/1973.pdf

    Keep in mind what Grant espouses with his S24o (sub twenty-four lb/Overnight) philosophy while perusing the early C'dale material. Almost a little creepy considering the character Grant has crafted for himself as going against the grain and as an iconoclast.

    Don't believe it? Compare what Grant's vision was for Bridgestone in '85 and '86 to what Cannondale's vistion for cycling was was starting from '73 to when they started producing bicycles in '83. Cannondale bicycles began with the vision of a randonneur bike. Look at the specs of the very first '83 build. Follow the evolution, always an all-purpose fits fenders/racks sport touring do everything bike through '84 and '85. See how absolutely epic the build becomes for the ST800 in '86 & '87:

    http://www.vintagecannondale.com/catalog.html

    Now compare that to what Grant envisions in '85 and '86. I'm calling it. Rivendell today, all the Grant beliefs/preferences are/were what Cannondale was in '86 with a single exception: Steel frames handcrafted in Japan instead of aluminum handcrafted frames in Pennsylvania. Sadly, the rhetoric of "steel is real" contributed in some manner to the demise of the 'real' Cannondale, through the Joe Montgomery era, the BIKE public company, the reorganization, and into the Dorel property.

    However, everything that a Bobish bike "is" and everything that a Rivendell "is" actually was a production Cannondale before it was ever adopted and brought to market by Grant.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/bridgestone/1985/index.html
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/bridgestone/1986/index.html

    This will turn the stomachs of some of the card carrying members of the BOBish cult, and those with heavy boat anchor "art bikes." However, I'm just sharing with you some historical factual information from which to cut through the Rivendell rhetoric and dogmatic marketing.

    It saddens me that these absolutely epic vintage Cannondale ST touring bikes aren't being restored (paint 'em please. They are more worthy of a Joe Bell or CyclArt respray than anything lugged, but do NOT get 'em powder coated. The heat treatment that makes a C'dale frame what it is does not tolerate the high temps of the powder coating process. Additionally the aluminum itself anneals. Ignore all opinions to the contrary.). Yet every day hundreds of cyclists search out for Bridgestone and Rivs, Olmos, Raleighs, and the like on the secondary market. So that's my post and my thread.

    Please share your opinions, thoughts (even if they are regurgitated beliefs packaged and re-packaged for you from the Riv and BOBish clan) and clamor, if you feel the need against these bikes, as they are definitely not steel, and therefore stand against all that you believe in.

    However, these handcrafted aluminum bicycles take more technical skill to craft than all but a very handful of the very best bicycle builders in the world possess. The skill level required to build a lugged steel bike compared to that required to weld thin wall oversize aluminum can not be reasonably compared. There is a reason that thinwall oversize aluminum frames aren't mass produced. You think they are, but those are THICK walled aluminum monstrocities are comparable to the epic vintage Cannondale and Klein's in the same way that a Schwinn stovepipe bike compares to a vintage Guerciotti/Olmo/Colgano. Compare what Gunnar/Waterford or Trek paid their top steel frame builders to what the average Cannondale framebuilder was paid. One was low rent, and still is. C'dale has always struggle to remain viable because a skilled aluminum welder can always find employment in shipbuilding, defense contracting, etc. Anyone can learn to braze a lugged bike in a weekend. Where is that skill going to get you a high paying job?

    So give 'em some respect. Let's find a way that you can retain the love affair that of the Italian grand-master holding a torch in one hand and a cappuccino in the other, and I'm not challenging any of the fundamental beliefs of the BOBish cult (save one). However, let's give credit where its due, and the reality is that vintage Cannondale Touring bikes were relevant and significant for the vision that existed from '73, but also for what they were in production.

    An '86 Cannondale ST800 is an epic bike. It is truly a grail find. It has components and kit on it that Grant would sell you today, if only he could, but he can't so he doesn't. Instead he tries to convince you that the Dia-Compe Silver shifter is somehow special in its own right. Trust me, Grant was right the first time when he explained that Japanese (not modern Taiwanese which he mostly sells now) components in the mid-80s were the high water mark for engineering, fit, precision, and finish. The hand polishing and obsession with quality are just phenomenal on stuff from that era.

    Go buy a Rivendell, and buy the best Riv Grant can sell you today. Build it up with modern dream components. It won't be half the bike that the C'dale vintage ST800 was. It will be a boat anchor, it will climb like a dog, it will make you hate bikepacking. It won't put the smile on your face that the C'dale does.

    There is enough rhetoric out there to the contrary. Just trying to balance the radical steel with some truth and historical balance. I'm just sayin'...

    and now you know. You'll never look at Rivendell the same again, and you'll have a smile on your face every time you see a Riv/BOB clone with their shellac'd tape etc. Remind 'em that the "original" Cannondale their bike imitates had Cinelli leather tape and ride away with a obnoxious smirk.


    4820051060_e45659bedf_z[1].jpg
    Last edited by mtnbke; 11-16-11 at 03:43 AM.

  2. #2
    Quirky Grifter LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
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    You know there won't be any ST's left for you if you keep hyping them. People will be swarming your CL for them.
    1980ish Free Spirit Sunbird fixed * 1996 Mongoose IBOC Zero-G * 1997 KHS Comp * 1990-ish Scapin * Lemond Buenos Aires Triple

  3. #3
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    '89 66cm Cannondale 3.0, '92 22" Cannondale M2000, '92 JxL Cannondale R1000 Tandem, '86 Cannondale ST800 27" (68.5cm) Touring bike w/Superbe Pro components and Phil Wood hubs.
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    I've been lucky enough to fall into three epic vintage Cannondale ST bicycles now. Actually, two bikes and one frame/fork.

    I actually do have an '86 ST800. In a blasphemous manner I removed the Superbe Pro pedals and gorgeous Cannondale branded leather straps/clips. I replaced them with Bebop pedals Gasp! Which I use one every bike I own (road/mountain/tandem). I also removed the Brooks as it made my willy go numb. Beatiful saddle. I was astounded for what the pedals and saddle were able to fetch on eBay. Almost paid for the whole bike. Mine was an especially amazing find in that the beatiful Sansin 36h sealed bearing hubs had been replaced with, I kid you not, Phil Wood 40h touring hubs (rear was a ethos correct freewheel hub not cassette hub). I actually bought some Kore cantilevers considering how many hundreds people would pay for the black Dia-Compe NGC 982s. However, I haven't been able to force myself to remove 'em yet. They are too amazing. My bike had seen the Superbe Pro downtube shifters replaced with Suntour Accushift Bar-cons. I sourced some Superbe Pro downtube shifters again, mounted 'em on Kelly-Take offs and swapped the Dia-Compe levers for Superbe Pro levers. Amazingly the caliper intended levers brake better than the cantilever designed levers for the cantis. However, that could be as much to do with the fact that I adjusted the cantis to get 'em perfectly set-up. What else? Well I removed the really nice Sugino 48/44/28 AT crank and BB and replaced it with a Phil Wood BB and Zinn custom 205mm triple crank with TA 48/38 rings and a Middleburn 24 bailout. I'm an idiot (which most of you already deduced from my OP). I can't even claim I didn't understand the ratio advantage the 205mm cranks would give me, as I had spent a lot of time with the Sheldon "gain ratio" calculators that take fully into account crank length. However, I found the TA rings and Middleburn ring for next to nothing and I live in Colorado. However, admittedly I can spin it out pretty quickly, albeit unloaded. The Superbe Pro seatpost is missing. I have a an American Classic post, and even a titanium American Classic post I picked up for nothing. However, I've never swapped over to either. There is some god awful heavy SK Sakae forged aluminum post attached to my Gasp! Selle Italia Prolink Gel Flow with faux carbon rails. What else changed. The Nitto stem was missing on mine and replaced with a Sakae SR "The Tube" stem. I replaced this with a silver Control Tech stem that looks perfect on the bike, actually. I like it better than I'd like the Nitto. I removed the Nitto Randonneur bars, which are just too ridiculously narrow for anyone that would proportionately ride a 68cm bike. I replaced 'em with WTB Mountain Road Drop bars which are incomparably wider in the drops (more proportional for my size) and much stiffer. New SRAM 870 6/7/8 speed chain only because it was at my local Performance, and I didn't want to wait for a Wipperman from Nashbar. I sourced some German made gumwall Continental TopTouring 2000 NOS tires which look incredible on the bike. However, I realized that someone is more a fool than I. Hard to believe, as it is. They rebuilt the wheels using narrow (15mm internal bead width) rims. I blew out $10 worth of new tubes before I realized that the rims were too narrow for wire-bead 27x1 1/4" tires. I couldn't source Mavic Module 4 rims (or even Module 3s, if you have either PM me. I'll take 32h, 36h, 40h, 48h) so I ordered a silver 48h Dyad. I'll rebuild the rear wheel, then as money allows order another for the front. I'll probably build with Wheelsmith DH13 spokes, but the lack of eyelets on the Dyad is leaving me to question whether I should just go with 14g straight.

    I should be shot, because before I had 100 miles on the bike I backed it into the garage while moving to the new place. I wasn't even driving into the garage just backing up to unload. Spectacularly beautiful bike in the ridiculously rare 27" size. Nobilette straightened out the Tange lugged steel fork for me. The steel fork took the brunt of it, being the weakest link compared to the strength of the aluminum frame. Rear alignment is no longer dead-on perfect, but I learned you can "cold set" an aluminum frame without damaging it. Who knew?

    I picked up a red 27" ST400 frame. All ST frames are identical save paint, and whether they take calipers or cantis. This will never be a touring bike, but will be built up as a true road bike. Some oxidation that has caused paint problems will require a refinish/repaint. Be careful with these thinwall frames. Sandblasting will remove the soft aluminum and you'll literally blast a hole in the tubing in no time flat. You can blast with walnut shells if you're very careful, or media in a bead/vibrating table, but no sandblasting. Came with an XT headset which I just don't get.

    Last month I saw an ad for a 27" Cannondale touring bike locally on my Craigslist. Keep in mind that non-steel 68cm and larger frames just do NOT ever appear on the secondary market. I finally was able to scrounge the moolah he was asking for an anguishingly long time later, and I had a real barn find!

    It was a white '87 ST400. Everything was absolutely original. It literally couldn't have any real miles on it. All the wear to paint and the components appears to be storage/climate related. It is 24 years old.

    Thought I'd share it with the forum:

    https://picasaweb.google.com/1040881...nnondaleST400#

    Nothing epic. Just good ol' functional stuff.

    Suntour alpha-3000 indexing group (derailleurs w/downtube shifters).
    Maillard 400 hubs with Sun/Mistral M13 rims (not nearly enough spokes)
    Sugino 42/52 170mm crank (strangely this clown bike crank has a Shimano 105 left crank arm)
    MKS pedals both missing bearing caps
    Suntour 14-30 freewheel
    Dia-Compe levers/calipers I'm not impressed with at all. Worst braking bike ever ridden, actually.
    Strong seatpost
    Vetta white saddle
    Tange Tioga headset
    Tange touring fork w/rack bosses
    The Nitto stem seems to be missing as on the first ride I remembered it being a Sakae but didn't double check.
    Cinelli white cork tape (makes me think the stem is the original Nitto).

    For now I just through a new set of Panaracer Pasela 27 x 1 1/8 (25-630)that Nashbar was blowing out on the bike. They really make the bike look good. I've noticed that my large bikes always look ridiculous with narrow tires. I like big wider tires anyway. They help with my outlier size, and somehow just look more proportional than tires that are 23s. The ST frame will accommodate wide a tire as I'd ever want even with fenders mounted.

    What freakin' bicycle designer thinks that you can use downtube shifters on 68.5cm frame. Are you kidding? Definitely in need of some more Kelly Take-Offs if someone has extra sets lying around. I don't know if its just the pads, or whether these vintage Dia-Compe 500N brakeset is just not comparable something modern.

    Thinking I'm okay with refinishing the bike as an ST400, except I'd much prefer the Banana paint scheme (sans "custom '8y Cannondale graphics") to the white/red that I have. However, I might like repainting it in another color scheme to redo it as another year/model.

    The Sugino crank (half Shimano) and Sugino BB will come off for either a Da Vinci 200mm triple or a Hi-Sierra/Zinn 200mm triple w/Phil Wood BB. I don't like friction shifting at all, but maybe I just need to "learn"? I do have some beautiful Mavic SSC derailleurs (the "erector" set 801 and 851 SSC ones) that I've never used. I'd need the Mavic/Simplex retrofriction shifters though. I also have an extra set of Mavic SSC black anodized white Mavic branded levers. I could use either pink or green A'me hoods on those. Then again I'm not sure I want this to be a Mavic bike. I don't have anything Campy. I'd love a Campy bike, although I hear finding 6/7/8 speed long cage rear derailleurs for Campy are impossible. I guess 8 speed Campy downtube shifters and triple front changers can be had?

    I'm just not in love with the Suntour alpha-3000. However, it shifts flawlessly and there is absolutely no reason whatsover that I should even be thinking about swapping everything out the "group." I'll definitely need stronger hubs with a higher drill and more rim. Maybe some Mavics on Mavic hubs, as I don't want to do 48h on this bike (Velocity Dyad only comes in 48 drill). I do like Phil Woods, but they are a pricey build. I don't want this bike to get out of control on me money wise and there is really nothing wrong/broken with it now. 170mm cranks are a joke and exhausting to spin. Never ridden cranks that short since I was a child.

    I absolutely need the Kelly Take-Offs before I get myself killed or hurt my knees to avoid shifting. I'd like much wider bars. Maybe a bit more rise in the stem (Nitto Tecnomic maybe?). I have a 1" Quill Cinelli Grammo titanium stem that I've never used. It is aching to get built onto something. I'd been saving it for acquiring a 70cm bike, though. On this 68.5cm bike that would be a pretty aggressive saddle to bar drop, at least for me. I could use "the Tube" I pulled off the ST800.

    So, thoughts? Anyone interested in swapping for some components and have something interesting to trade? What would you do with it? Ride it as is? Repaint it as money allows (pretending its even an ST600 maybe)? Do you like the white/red including original cable housing? I actually happen to have a red Prolink Gel flow saddle which will be on it soon (bought it for my red tandem, so I'll need another of those). The MKS pedals are off as they are missing the aforementioned bearing caps. I need another set of Bebops now for this bike. Plastic platforms on it temporarily (test ride). I'd like another C'dale branded water bottle cage.

    Definitely interested in build advice (even if it is "Leave it alone!"). Rides smooth.

    What do you think? More pics:

    https://picasaweb.google.com/1040881...nnondaleST400#



    IMG_20111115_163642[1].jpg
    Last edited by mtnbke; 11-16-11 at 03:36 AM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member stevenc's Avatar
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    Ii like that trailer a lot. Anyone has one/seen one in the wild recently?

  5. #5
    Rustbelt Rider mkeller234's Avatar
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    That 87 Cannondale is really sweet. It's funny how much it looks like a bike you would see on the forums. You are right about the paint and matching accessories, it's understated but very striking. I sure would like to see one in the flesh. Were steel forks common on Cannondales?

    I personally don't care who started the style first, they are both nice. It's my assumption that you can probably look back even farther in time and find other bicycles that carried this torch. To me it's like debating who made the first punk rock album...it's not really important, do you like the music or not?
    |^^^^^^^^^^^^^^| ||
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  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    '89 66cm Cannondale 3.0, '92 22" Cannondale M2000, '92 JxL Cannondale R1000 Tandem, '86 Cannondale ST800 27" (68.5cm) Touring bike w/Superbe Pro components and Phil Wood hubs.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets View Post
    You know there won't be any ST's left for you if you keep hyping them. People will be swarming your CL for them.
    I know, I know. But they are such epic bikes! Besides I can't use all the clown bike sizes.
    Last edited by mtnbke; 11-16-11 at 03:45 AM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member shrinkboy's Avatar
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    when i see bikes with only an inch or two of seat post showing, i immediately think that the rider is trying to adapt a frame that's too big for his size. that is an awesome bike, but it just looks 'not right' to me-- without knowing the rider's height, standover, etc i'd think he should look in the future at frames several cm's smaller than this one

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    mtnbke, You might want to PM rccardr or pastorbobnlnh, to name two ST owners for how to modernize/upgrade. I have a 3.0 touring frame I rebuilt earlier this year and it's a slightly different design so I can't provide particulars about the ST.

    These bikes do seem to update very well so you have plenty of options. Bar ends are a nice system to move the levers to the handle bars and look appropriate on a touring frame. Tektro dual pivot calipers will improve braking and Harris Cyclery is worth looking at for a wheelset.

    Brad

    PS While I think it was on a bike that was stolen, I'll see if an old Cannondale water bottle cage is still around.
    Last edited by bradtx; 11-16-11 at 06:18 AM. Reason: PS

  9. #9
    Quirky Grifter LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
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    Why do you want another bottle cage? If the shifters are too low then those bottles are surely well out of reach

    Besides take-offs you could also grab some barends for $50 or so or even stem shifters for really cheap. Most people hate stem shifters but I like 'em just fine on bikes that have had them.
    1980ish Free Spirit Sunbird fixed * 1996 Mongoose IBOC Zero-G * 1997 KHS Comp * 1990-ish Scapin * Lemond Buenos Aires Triple

  10. #10
    SNARKY MEMBER CardiacKid's Avatar
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    2:30 am and 2 epistles on the joys of Cannondales? You seriously need to cut back on the caffeine.

  11. #11
    Quirky Grifter LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
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    Yeah, if that's your proper saddle height, I'd go for a smaller frame and a longer stem (if needed to get your reach).

    Perhaps you have the bars jacked up like that because you'd like less reach, however. If you want higher bars than a smaller frame will get you, get a Nitto Technomic high rise stem.
    1980ish Free Spirit Sunbird fixed * 1996 Mongoose IBOC Zero-G * 1997 KHS Comp * 1990-ish Scapin * Lemond Buenos Aires Triple

  12. #12
    Senior Member Iowegian's Avatar
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    So you got that one? I emailed after he dropped the price but apparently I was too slow.

    I have a 1983 but I think it's a 25". I've been looking for a 27" but I really want one with canti brakes and no luck yet. Did you also get the one in Ft. Collins about 6-12 months ago? Arghh!

    Here's mine
    It's in pieces now since the BB shell stripped out and I had the shell re-tapped to Italian threads but haven't put it back together again.

    It came with the SuperbePro post, long cage RD, original erector-set rear rack, etc. If you're interested in any of that stuff maybe we can make a deal.

    I'd really like to test-ride one of your 27" bikes and even try the longer cranks. I'll get in touch once I get my 83 'dale back together.

  13. #13
    Freewheel Medic pastorbobnlnh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuckk View Post
    I think the white bike is just too big.
    mtnbke is a big guy. Over 2 meters he claims. I believe it!

    Bob
    Dreaming of Summertime in NH!

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  14. #14
    aka: Dr. Cannondale rccardr's Avatar
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    OK, I'll say it: Use a powder coating expert who has experience with high performance aluminum and it's not an issue. Best I've found is Len McCreary at Figure LLC in Manassas Park, VA. Great guy, a cyclist himself, and his work is perfect. As in perfect. He's done a bunch of frames for me over the past several years. All of them have been built up for customers who have not not a lick of trouble with them. There's another 6 or so coming his way soon for my over-the-winter build activities.

    My personal favorite is also the 86-88 ST, but I like the caliper version better than the canti ones. Tektro 556's, R200L levers, Sakae Road Champion 38's, Ritchey Streem saddle, Ultegra hubs laced to Open Pro rims with Michelin Pro3's, 9 speed cassette with Dura-Ace DT shifters, Ultegra or D-A FD/RD, and either a sweet 53/39/30 triple or 50/34 compact. Built a bunch like that, and you can ride 'em across the country without a problem, as several of my customers have done.

    The Criterium-style bikes have their place as well, lots of people around here like them. Even with the tighter geometry they make a nice daily rider.
    Hard at work in the Secret Underground Laboratory...

  15. #15
    Senior Member KOBE's Avatar
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    Iowgian, didn't you have"looking for 66cm St800" in your signature ? Did you settle for the 63cm or just give up looking?

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    Senior Member Roger M's Avatar
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    To the OP: After all of the smack you have posted in previous threads, I hope you actually ride it

    My suggestion would be to get some high spoke count wheels

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    Senior Member Homebrew01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkeller234 View Post
    Were steel forks common on Cannondales?
    Yes, they all had steel forks the first few years.



    What's "BOB" ?
    Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike

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    Senior Member KOBE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrew01 View Post

    What's "BOB" ?
    Bridgestone Owners Bunch, the Grant Petersen Bible.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/bridgest...ellisabob.html

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    Senior Member fender1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbke View Post
    I know, I know. But they are such epic bikes! Besides I can't use all the clown bike sizes.
    What is "epic" about them and what does that even mean????? Just seems like a XL verison of a garden variety road bike from the mid-late 80's. If you like it, great. You need to ride more and write less.

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    Senior Member Mercian Rider's Avatar
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    Although pricey, as you say, I'd save for a get the Phil 48s. They will last a lifetime and you won't break an axle.

    Looks like a fine bike for you. I bought one of C'dale's handebar bags from the era before they made bikes. Well thought out design, well made, and lasted many years.

    I had an '84 C'dale road bike with Campy SR/NR. Those robust welds were impressive.
    No Fun. No ride.

    ~Paul "Bonehead" Lehman

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    Larger Chainring Oregon Southpaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fender1 View Post
    What is "epic" about them and what does that even mean????? Just seems like a XL verison of a garden variety road bike from the mid-late 80's. If you like it, great. You need to ride more and write less.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dovetube View Post
    At times my crotch has thought the title to this thread.

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    rain dog mainstreetexile's Avatar
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    It's still not quite clear from the length narrative above, are these bikes epic or not epic?

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    Senior Member Mercian Rider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainstreetexile View Post
    It's still not quite clear from the length narrative above, are these bikes epic or not epic?
    Perhaps it's the narrative that's epic, as the Illiad and Odyssey? I also infer that Grant Petersen secretly designed this particular C'dale? Presents a strong case for that.
    No Fun. No ride.

    ~Paul "Bonehead" Lehman

  24. #24
    Freewheel Medic pastorbobnlnh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rccardr View Post
    OK, I'll say it: Use a powder coating expert who has experience with high performance aluminum and it's not an issue. Best I've found is Len McCreary at Figure LLC in Manassas Park, VA. Great guy, a cyclist himself, and his work is perfect. As in perfect. He's done a bunch of frames for me over the past several years. All of them have been built up for customers who have not not a lick of trouble with them. There's another 6 or so coming his way soon for my over-the-winter build activities.
    And I meant to respond earlier to this: Frank the Welder PCs all of his aluminum downhill frames. This occurs after they have been heat treated. His frames are built like tanks. As he says you could hit a concrete wall at 40mph and his frames won't bend.
    Bob
    Dreaming of Summertime in NH!

    Visit my websites:
    FreeWheelSpa.com orpastorbobnlnh.com

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    Senior Member Iowegian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KOBE View Post
    Iowgian, didn't you have"looking for 66cm St800" in your signature ? Did you settle for the 63cm or just give up looking?
    Yes to all three, more or less. I like the 63cm but as you can see the seatpost is up a bit more than I'd like. I suppose I could just get a taller stem but I'd sure like to try a jumbo on for size since I have a 27" steel Schwinn that seems to fit very well.

    As for the 'epic' stuff, to me these bikes really shine in the large sizes. I have no idea what a 56cm would be like but in the sizes talked about in this thread I've never had a steel bike come close, and I have some well-regarded touring frames such as a Specialized Expedition, a Miyata 1000 clone (Univega), and others. For stiffness and load-handling ability the over-sized AL tubing in these frames is the ticket for me. Even unloaded, I enjoy the stiffness of the frame since us big guys can generate a lot of torque, even if it is only for a few yards

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