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  1. #1
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    Better Brakes for Nishiki International

    Wasnt sure where to post this. I have a Nishiki International 20-25 yrs. old that I am hoping to upgrade the brakes on. Presently it has the original Dia-Compe brakes on it.

    What would be the best upgrade for the money regarding brakes?
    Also I presently am running 32s appears there is more room. Any one know how big I can comfortably go?

  2. #2
    Senior Member gaucho777's Avatar
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    Do you have a model number for the brakes? Are they center-pull brakes? Before you replace the brakes, you might consider simply replacing the pads. Brake pads will harden after 20-25 years, and you will notice much improved performance with new pads. Kool Stop is widely considered the best option for replacement pads.

    As for new tire clearance, photos will help. It's hard to say for sure without seeing the bike. Plus, we love photos!
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  3. #3
    Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race dddd's Avatar
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    My International had Centerpulls, and the brakes were quite strong after I tuned it up (I may have put better pads on???).

    That bike had alloy rims, btw.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for your reply. The pads have been replaced, not to long ago. I think they are center pulls. I will try the Kool stop Pads. I will also try & get some pics of existing clearance on the front & back. Probably will be a bit after 9:00 pm Kansas time before I can get to it.

    Again, the help is appreciated!

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    Tektro makes nice long reach dual-pivot brakes.

  6. #6
    Senior Member No Whey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kawriverrat View Post
    Wasnt sure where to post this. I have a Nishiki International 20-25 yrs. old that I am hoping to upgrade the brakes on. Presently it has the original Dia-Compe brakes on it.

    What would be the best upgrade for the money regarding brakes?
    Also I presently am running 32s appears there is more room. Any one know how big I can comfortably go?
    Lined housing, and jagwire/QBP slick cables, salmon Kool Stop pads (continental or Eagle II I think).
    After that long the cables and housing need replacement anyway.
    That will improve your braking quite a bit.

    Of course, that's if you want it to remain close to original.

  7. #7
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    Be sure to take photos of the clearance between the lower rear stays.
    Be the person your dog thinks you are.
    T.J.

  8. #8
    )) <> (( illwafer's Avatar
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    i would say replace the pads as well. ive never encountered a bike where i wanted to replace the brakes. some definitely work better than others, but for almost all will stop you safely.

  9. #9
    Senior Member DiegoFrogs's Avatar
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    I've ridden mostly low-end bikes my whole life, and with some work I've always been able to get both brakes to skid the wheels. The only exception is, of course, steel rims.

  10. #10
    Senior Member randyjawa's Avatar
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    The Nishiki International, came with either side pull calipers, or center pull cantilever brakes. Here is a picture of an International featuring the canti brake set-up. If this is what the OP has, all he needs is new brake pads. I have found these cantilever brakes to work just fine...
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  11. #11
    Fat Guy on a Little Bike KonAaron Snake's Avatar
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    What rims are on it? Do they have any machining? Are they clean? I agree with everyone else, it's never the brakes, it's the pads, rims, and toe in.

  12. #12
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    I assume it does NOT have black anodized rims, which compromise braking performance. KoolStop salmon pads will help quite a bit. Another trick is to replace just the levers with aero-style units, which will boost your braking force by about 10%. I had to do this on my Bianchi, because the original Modolo levers required too long a finger reach for fast braking from me. I substituted aero Shimano units, which helped noticeably. but braking was still horrible w/ black Shimano pads.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
    What rims are on it? Do they have any machining? Are they clean? I agree with everyone else, it's never the brakes, it's the pads, rims, and toe in.
    They are aluminum alloy & they are clean. Going by the pic posted by randyjawa I have center pull brakes. The fork in the pic may be the same as mine. The different brake set up kind of makes it hard to tell. The one difference is my lugs on the fork are chrome. Also I have bar end shifters. I have come to really like & enjoy this bike! These old Nishikis make fantastic do it all, commuter bikes.
    You all have convinced me to change out the pads for Kool Stops. Soon as I find my cammera I will post pics of existing tire clearance.
    Really want to know how big I can go on tires. Especially with icy roads being a possibility any time now.
    Last edited by Kawriverrat; 11-16-11 at 10:51 PM.

  14. #14
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    The International eveolved quite a bit over the years, It could have side side, centre-pull or cantilever brakes.

    As previously suggested, clean the rims and upgade to some good pads and cable housing. I'd also change the cables themselves. It's not unusual for manufacturers to scrimp by using light gauge cables, which results in spongy brakes. If they are cantilever brakes, as per Randy's pics, improperly set pads can severely alter performance, though after this amount of time, they'd normally have conformed to the rim.

    If there is sufficient frame clearances, recommended safe maximum tire widths are based on the rim width and flange style. Standard rims will safely accommodate tires up to 2x times the rim width (measured between the inside of the rim flanges). Rims with hooked-edges on the inside of the flanges extend the maximum tire width up to 2.25 times the rim width.

  15. #15
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    Whether you replace the calipers or levers or both or neither, replace the cables and housings. New stuff usually works better than old, except with the old English 3-speeds.
    You don't read my signature anyway, do you?

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  16. #16
    Senior Member sauze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noglider View Post
    Whether you replace the calipers or levers or both or neither, replace the cables and housings. New stuff usually works better than old, except with the old English 3-speeds.

    A big +1 to this, I was amazed at the performance increase I got by replacing 20 year old cables + housing (after typing that I realized I probably shouldn't have been amazed ... still )

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