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  1. #1
    K2ProFlex baby! ilikebikes's Avatar
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    Bent steel pedal arm

    My "James" cycle has a bent pedal arm and am asking what the best (safest) way of bending it back into place would be. Its slightly bent but enough to just make contact with the chaingaurd while pedaling. I checked the chaingaurd and its fine. I've seen the LBS use a long steel pipe to bend them back in place, is this "the norm?" or do you guys have a better way? Please let me know.
    You see, their morals, their code...it's a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They're only as good as the world allows them to be. I'll show you. When the chips are down, these...These "civilized" people...they'll eat each other. See, I'm not a monster. I'm just ahead of the curve

  2. #2
    Decrepit Member Scooper's Avatar
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    I'm not sure what a pedal arm is. Are you talking about the crank arm?
    - Stan

  3. #3
    Senior Member oldroads's Avatar
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    Yes, slipping a long pipe over it is a good first attempt.
    Vinny - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles - OldRoads.com
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  4. #4
    K2ProFlex baby! ilikebikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scooper View Post
    I'm not sure what a pedal arm is. Are you talking about the crank arm?
    Yup, the crank arm.
    You see, their morals, their code...it's a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They're only as good as the world allows them to be. I'll show you. When the chips are down, these...These "civilized" people...they'll eat each other. See, I'm not a monster. I'm just ahead of the curve

  5. #5
    Hopelessly addicted... photogravity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilikebikes View Post
    My "James" cycle has a bent pedal arm and am asking what the best (safest) way of bending it back into place would be. Its slightly bent but enough to just make contact with the chaingaurd while pedaling. I checked the chaingaurd and its fine. I've seen the LBS use a long steel pipe to bend them back in place, is this "the norm?" or do you guys have a better way? Please let me know.
    I think that's fine to do, so long as it's steel. Alloy is another story, of course.

    PS. I still want that bike... Not jealous, just envious.
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    Ridding the world of derailleurs, one bicycle at a time.

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  6. #6
    K2ProFlex baby! ilikebikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by photogravity View Post
    I think that's fine to do, so long as it's steel. Alloy is another story, of course.

    PS. I still want that bike... Not jealous, just envious.
    You see, their morals, their code...it's a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They're only as good as the world allows them to be. I'll show you. When the chips are down, these...These "civilized" people...they'll eat each other. See, I'm not a monster. I'm just ahead of the curve

  7. #7
    Senior Member randyjawa's Avatar
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    If you do intend to straighten the arm, might I suggest that you remove the crank from the bicycle, first. You would not want the excessive pressure finding a way into the frame set.

    For what it is worth, I am working on a Peugeot with a seriously bent steel crank arm. I intend to try to replace it but, being a Peugeot five speed, I might have a tough time finding the perfect crank. If that is the case, I will straighten the arm out using the cold set method. If it looks good when done, I will be set...


    You will notice that the crank arm was bent far enough in to actually damage the lovely original alloy Peugeot fender. How did it get bent so badly? Incredibly poor shipping technique...





    So far, I have collected everything I need to restore the bike, except the correct crank arm. And that might not even be a problem. There just might be one hiding in The Old Shed.
    Learn how to find, restore and maintain vintage road bicycles at... MY "TEN SPEEDS"

  8. #8
    K2ProFlex baby! ilikebikes's Avatar
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    @ Randyjawa, Sweet find! Hope things go well with that crank arm! OK, I remove the crank arm to cold set it, how/what do I anchor the arm to to keep it still and secure enough to bend it with the pipe?
    You see, their morals, their code...it's a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They're only as good as the world allows them to be. I'll show you. When the chips are down, these...These "civilized" people...they'll eat each other. See, I'm not a monster. I'm just ahead of the curve

  9. #9
    Knotty Guy Anthropy's Avatar
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    Remove the crank arm and take it to someone with a hydraulic press. You can then have them bend it back right where it needs it. They can control the amount of force needed with the press. Of course, the arm needs to be steel.

    Tom

  10. #10
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilikebikes View Post
    OK, I remove the crank arm to cold set it, how/what do I anchor the arm to to keep it still and secure enough to bend it with the pipe?
    Clamp it in a bench-mounted vise.

  11. #11
    spookeaymarine.info Spookeay Bird's Avatar
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    The press is the best way. The pipe can work. But before you do. Wrap the heck out of it with electrical tape first to keep the pipe from marring the chrome. If you have a bench vise, that would work also. put it in the jaws with the arc of the bend compressed in the jaws and tighten it down till it mates flat with the jaws and leave it over night. just my 2 cents.

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  12. #12
    Senior Member 009jim's Avatar
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    I would heat it and bend in a hydraulic press.

  13. #13
    old and fixed... clubman's Avatar
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    I've had success propping the arm a half inch off the concrete floor and using a maul and a hardwood block. Those arms can be very soft and you can control the bend easily. Or a bench vise and a couple of shims...

  14. #14
    K2ProFlex baby! ilikebikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthropy View Post
    Remove the crank arm and take it to someone with a hydraulic press. You can then have them bend it back right where it needs it. They can control the amount of force needed with the press. Of course, the arm needs to be steel.

    Tom
    Hydrolic press, yeah, I don't know anyone with a hydrolic press.
    You see, their morals, their code...it's a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They're only as good as the world allows them to be. I'll show you. When the chips are down, these...These "civilized" people...they'll eat each other. See, I'm not a monster. I'm just ahead of the curve

  15. #15
    Schwinnasaur Schwinnsta's Avatar
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    Vise and pipe works. I did one not too long ago. First measure how far it needs to be bent and do it a littie at a time. You don't want to go past the amount you need because metal fatigues quickly in its "plastic" zone.

  16. #16
    K2ProFlex baby! ilikebikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clubman View Post
    I've had success propping the arm a half inch off the concrete floor and using a maul and a hardwood block. Those arms can be very soft and you can control the bend easily. Or a bench vise and a couple of shims...

    Hmmmm, this sounds like a plan! I'm pretty good at whackin' stuff with a hammer! LOL! Think a hard rubber mallet might do the job? I've got one of those.
    You see, their morals, their code...it's a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They're only as good as the world allows them to be. I'll show you. When the chips are down, these...These "civilized" people...they'll eat each other. See, I'm not a monster. I'm just ahead of the curve

  17. #17
    Senior Member randyjawa's Avatar
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    OK, I remove the crank arm to cold set it, how/what do I anchor the arm to to keep it still and secure enough to bend it with the pipe?
    Use the vise and blocks, as clubman suggests. That is exactly what I intend to do and I know I will get the arm straight.
    Learn how to find, restore and maintain vintage road bicycles at... MY "TEN SPEEDS"

  18. #18
    Senior Member randyjawa's Avatar
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    Do not use heat. Do not use impact. Use a vise, three hardwood or alloy blocks, and press the arm straight. That is what I intend to do and I have done it before, but only with steel. Do not use a bent alloy arm!
    Learn how to find, restore and maintain vintage road bicycles at... MY "TEN SPEEDS"

  19. #19
    Research and Development
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    Quote Originally Posted by clubman View Post
    I've had success propping the arm a half inch off the concrete floor and using a maul and a hardwood block. Those arms can be very soft and you can control the bend easily. Or a bench vise and a couple of shims...
    I agree with this method. Used it more than once. Wood block and a BFH. If aluminum, you only have very few shots to get it right. Bang on it too much and it will work harden and break, or at least develop cracks which will eventually lead to catastrophic failure at the worst possible moment. Steel, you can beat on all day long.

  20. #20
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilikebikes View Post
    OK, I remove the crank arm to cold set it, how/what do I anchor the arm to to keep it still and secure enough to bend it with the pipe?
    Clamp it in a bench-mounted vise, preferably with the bench bolted securely to the floor. Slip a long steel pipe over the arm and apply Great Force to move it where it needs to be.

  21. #21
    K2ProFlex baby! ilikebikes's Avatar
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    This thread is two years old, that bike id loooong gone.
    You see, their morals, their code...it's a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They're only as good as the world allows them to be. I'll show you. When the chips are down, these...These "civilized" people...they'll eat each other. See, I'm not a monster. I'm just ahead of the curve

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