Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 28
  1. #1
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    1938 Torpedo Single-speed Brake Hub on 1949 Rotrax track - Advice?

    I have a couple of questions about this hub but first, a bit of background info...

    I have recently acquired a beautiful (to me) 1949 Rotrax Vel d'Hiv track frame. It's still in the UK, waiting for me to pick it up on my next visit home but my mind is already on the build
    [IMG]
    26 Alpine & 25inch Rotrax 022 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    The fork crown is drilled for a brake but not the seat stay bridge. That would normally be fine as I bought it intending to use it as a fixed gear, as it was made to be used. However, due to a series of fatal accidents involving the fashionable riding brake-less track bikes on the streets the police have started to come down hard on anyone caught without brakes front and back and have started issuing on-the-spot $650 fines for anyone they catch. It's a very public campaign with prominent coverage on TV and in the press.

    In the UK a fixed gear is regarded as a brake (as indeed it is - 1 : a device for arresting or preventing the motion of a mechanism usually by means of friction 2: something used to slow down or stop movement or activity) but in Japan the police are arguing that a brake is a device affixed to a bicycle, although it hasn't been argued in court yet.

    As I'm not about to drill a hole in the lovely seat stay bridge on this frame, and I don't want to hide it with alloy plates to mount a brake, I've decided to go with a hub brake. There is a Sturmey Archer 2-speed fixed hub from the 30s with a brake that would be my first choice but are very, very rare. Then this came up on eBay, an NOS 1938 Sachs Torpedo:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7620 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    How it lasted 73 years in this pristine condition is anyone's guess but it seems to have done so in Hungary, where I bought it from. I can't help looking at that eagle and imagining a swastika in the orb. It's really weird. I don't think I could bring myself to use it if there was but it doesn't seem the Nazis ever appropriated this particular view of an eagle.

    It is a beautiful thing with very obviously thick, lustrous chrome, even on the dust cover, in much cheaper mild steel in later hubs. The dust cover even has a felt ring inside, which would have been oiled or greased in order to better keep dust out. Some pics:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7621 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    I have another 3 later Torpedo hubs, from the 60s and 70s, so I already have the smaller of these 2 c-spanners in this shot:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7622 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    After taking the axle-nut off, the small c-spanner removes the knurled nut. Then the only thing you can undo from there is what looks to be a smaller version of the ball-ring on a Sturmey Archer. In this shot you can see the felt-lined dust cover:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7623 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]
    IMG_7624 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Now the questions:
    1. Do I actually need to take the hub apart to clean it and regrease everything? Or would it be enough to just flush the hub with oil until it stopped coming out dirty? I think I do, not least in order to regrease the bearings.

    3. If I do take the hub apart, the only way to secure the hub would be by securing the brake lever but I'm worried that doing this would over-apply the brake and damage it somehow. I know that the way of securing a Sturmey Archer is by putting its flange in a vice but I don't want to risk damaging the chrome. Perhaps I should lace the hub into a wheel and then undo the 'ball-ring' against the spokes, which is the way I've found easiest with SA hubs.

    4. The locking ring in the above photo is threaded anti-clockwise as it serves as a lock-ring of the fixed gear type. However, the inner, non-chromed side looks like a bearing race. Any thoughts on that? Is it perhaps meant to 'wedge' the cog in place? The hub takes a standard Sachs/SA/Shimano 3-dent cog.
    Last edited by Dawes-man; 01-07-12 at 09:46 PM.
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  2. #2
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    A better shot of the lock-ring:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7625 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  3. #3
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Just realised I didn't show the end I'm talking about. With the lock-nut and dust cover in place:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7626 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    And undone, to reveal the 'ball-ring':
    [IMG]
    IMG_7627 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    And the bridge I don't want to drill through:
    [IMG]
    26 Alpine & 25inch Rotrax 029 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  4. #4
    old and fixed... clubman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    My Bikes
    roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic
    Posts
    1,889
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    FWIW , the Duomatic hub is the finest coaster brake hub I've ridden and I own 2 of them. Try these good people at http://hubstripping.wordpress.com/torpedo-duomatic-fs/ for some related support. I've dissembled and re-assembled F&S hubs using their schematics.

    Isn't that chrome something else?

  5. #5
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by clubman View Post
    FWIW , the Duomatic hub is the finest coaster brake hub I've ridden and I own 2 of them. Try these good people at http://hubstripping.wordpress.com/torpedo-duomatic-fs/ for some related support. I've dissembled and re-assembled F&S hubs using their schematics.

    Isn't that chrome something else?
    Thanks. I sometimes post there. In fact, I bought my 2nd Duomatic from Marco through that site. With this SS Torpedo, I have 2 Sachs hub projects on the go. The other is fitting an Automatic to my other track bike, for the same reasons outlined above. I brought this here first because of its C&V content.

    The best chrome I have ever seen was on the bumper of a 1972 Mercedes. The owner told me the bumper was made of brass. Gorgeous!
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,432
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here's a pic of one apart:



    Can't remember any issues taking it apart and rebuilding it.

    It's a cool piece (no Eagle on mine from the early 30's)


  7. #7
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Otis View Post
    Here's a pic of one apart:
    Can't remember any issues taking it apart and rebuilding it.

    It's a cool piece (no Eagle on mine from the early 30's)
    Thank you, Otis! And that's a lovely machine. But really, is that all there is inside the hub?
    Do you think there's any possibility of damaging the brake mechanism by applying the torque necessary to free the ball-ring (as it is indeed such)? I might just give it a go and see how tightly the ball-ring is screwed on...
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  8. #8
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Dawes-man View Post
    And that's a lovely machine.
    I take that back - I've just looked at your other photos of the machine on Flickr and it's a FABULOUS machine. Never heard of a Cicognani... did you manage to find out more?

    And that pedal-like front hub is really interesting. Where did you find such a machine!?
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  9. #9
    Senior Member AZORCH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Liberty, Missouri
    My Bikes
    1966 Paramount P-13 | 1971 Raleigh International | 1982 Gazelle AA Champion Mondial Special | 1980s Freschi Supreme Super Cromo | 1985 Katakura Silk | 1989 Waterford PDG Paramount | 2012 Boulder Brevet | 2014 Cycles Toussaint Velo Routier
    Posts
    2,474
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Aww, jeez, yer killin' me here, Dawes-man, with yet another soon-to-be-incredible thread!

    Subscribing now.
    The Early Morning Cyclist: marksbikes.wordpress.com
    Life's too dang short to ride ugly bikes.

  10. #10
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AZORCH View Post
    Aww, jeez, yer killin' me here, Dawes-man, with yet another soon-to-be-incredible thread!

    Subscribing now.
    I sure hope so. I've sent a message to Jens Hansen, the 'Torpedo Coaster-brake Man' in Germany. A very useful site for anyone using any of the Torpedo family, including the Duomatic, of course. Jens carries most spares, too. He can use some English but it's better to copy him the names of parts in German from the parts lists on his site. So I've asked him if 'the ball ring turns anti-clockwise (nach links) to remove?' And 'Can I damage the brake parts (Bremsmantel & Bremskonus) if I use the brake arm (Bremshebel) to stop the hub and turn the ball ring (Gewindekopf) against it?'

    I'm really interested in this hub and think it's a work of art. I can't wait to get it apart. I've had the Duomatic on my Dawes apart and it's very well made as well as being very easy to work on and a really useful hub. Brilliant for around town.

    I initially made contact with Jens through the Hubstripping site that clubman recommended above. That's a great site for info about Duomatics.
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  11. #11
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Just a data correction - the part I have been calling a ball-ring is properly called the 'Driver'.
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  12. #12
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    This is from the German part of the www.torpedo-coasterbrake.com site and shows the very hub I have, except mine has a floating brake arm, like the one Otis has on his gorgeous Cicognani above.

    [IMG]
    torpedo-freilauf-betriebsanleitung-1938 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,432
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Dawes-man View Post
    I take that back - I've just looked at your other photos of the machine on Flickr and it's a FABULOUS machine. Never heard of a Cicognani... did you manage to find out more?

    And that pedal-like front hub is really interesting. Where did you find such a machine!?
    I really do not remember any issues doing the R&R on the hub, and it was the first coaster brake hub I had worked since I was about twelve years old. It did have the cogs on it so I may have used a chainwhip to aid in taking it apart. I really do not know if I had to use the brake arm or not, but I think I did use it as leverage when re-assembling it. Sorry, it was one of those things I just did, it came it allright, and I never thought about it again. I only really remember the ones that go wrong!

    The Cicognani was bought (where else) on ebay. It somehow ended up in an attic in Livonia MI. According to the seller, it was brought over by his friend's family when immigrating. It must have been a very expensive bike in its day, but still seems like extra baggage for a middle class family to bring to the new world. I really wish I knew more about it. But the seller was not very receptive to exploring the details for me. It kind of went for peanuts, as it was a poor ad with small out of focus photos. The head-tube details made me want it, and I put in a low-ball snipe bid thinking there was no way I'd actually get it. But everybody else must have been sleeping, as I did.

    It's a pro level bike from the day, but there's not much/any info on Cicognani. I found a scan of his catalog that shows lots of racing palmeres, and photos from L'Eroica of a 1920's bike that has been restored. I was told he had a son that was active racer through the 50's, but he had died not too long ago. I did stumble upon this link recently which shows the racer Amletto Giovani wearing a Cicognani jersey.

    http://flying-scot.com/miscellaneous...kie_lenzi.html

  14. #14
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Otis View Post
    I really do not remember any issues doing the R&R on the hub, and it was the first coaster brake hub I had worked since I was about twelve years old.

    Sorry, it was one of those things I just did, it came it allright, and I never thought about it again. I only really remember the ones that go wrong!
    Not at all! Many thanks for the help you have provided.

    Quote Originally Posted by Otis View Post
    I did stumble upon this link recently which shows the racer Amletto Giovani wearing a Cicognani jersey.
    Thanks also for the Cicognani info. I bet it was a thrill to find the picture
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  15. #15
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Just heard from Jens, who says NOT to undo the drive side against the brake arm as that can damage the hub. Glad I asked! The hub should be opened from the brake-arm end, which is opposite to the Duomatic and the Sturmey Archer.
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  16. #16
    Get off my lawn! Velognome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    The Garden State
    My Bikes
    1917 Loomis, 1923 Rudge, 1930 Hercules Renown, 1947 Mclean, 1948 JA Holland, 1955 Hetchins, 1957 Carlton Flyer, 1962 Raleigh Sport, 1978&81 Raleigh Gomp GS', 2010 Raliegh Clubman
    Posts
    5,296
    Mentioned
    16 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Resilion canti brakes would also be a good, period correct option since they clamp the the forks, although that would be more clutter than the coaster brake option.

  17. #17
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Velognome View Post
    Resilion canti brakes would also be a good, period correct option since they clamp the the forks, although that would be more clutter than the coaster brake option.
    Thanks for the thought. Yes, that's right. I did consider Resilion as I have a spare set to hand (don't know if the canti clamps are the right size) but, as you say, they would be more clutter and part of the beauty of the frame is its simplicity. Also, the paint on the Rotrax is period and very good and I'm loathe to clamp stuff to it that might damage the paint. Weight-wise, I don't think there'd be much in it. I'll just check... ah, alloy levers, cables and 4 cantilevers weigh 880g against 1065g for the hub, a difference of 185g, or 6.5oz. I reckon the steel Resilion levers would make them pretty much the same.

    I'm very pleased with this hub, though. I've just got it apart and just looking at the 73 year old thrills me. The smell reminds me of the blacksmith's forge in my village when I was growing up. I'll take photos in the morning before cleaning it up and post them here.
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  18. #18
    Get off my lawn! Velognome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    The Garden State
    My Bikes
    1917 Loomis, 1923 Rudge, 1930 Hercules Renown, 1947 Mclean, 1948 JA Holland, 1955 Hetchins, 1957 Carlton Flyer, 1962 Raleigh Sport, 1978&81 Raleigh Gomp GS', 2010 Raliegh Clubman
    Posts
    5,296
    Mentioned
    16 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    It is a beautiful hub indeed!

  19. #19
    rhm
    rhm is offline
    multimodal commuter rhm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NJ, NYC, LI
    My Bikes
    1945? Fothergill, 1948 Raleigh Record Ace, 1954 Drysdale, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1972 Fuji Finest, 1983 Trek 720, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...
    Posts
    12,366
    Mentioned
    31 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Dawes-man, I realize in your last post you have already (and rightly) rejected this type of option, but another brake that would be period correct and doesn't require drilling the frame is the Philco Centralpull such as this one that I had installed on my Fothergill for a while:



    It clamps to the stays. It would be possible to put it under the chain stays. It's not a very strong brake (perhaps the fault of the levers I used it with), but it would probably satisfy the legal requirement.

  20. #20
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rhm View Post
    Dawes-man, I realize in your last post you have already (and rightly) rejected this type of option, but another brake that would be period correct and doesn't require drilling the frame is the Philco Centralpull such as this one that I had installed on my Fothergill for a while:

    It clamps to the stays. It would be possible to put it under the chain stays. It's not a very strong brake (perhaps the fault of the levers I used it with), but it would probably satisfy the legal requirement.
    Thanks for the suggestion, rhm. That's a pretty funky looking device and good to know about.

    This is the look I'm aiming for:
    [IMG]
    IMG_5263 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    In fact, when I get the Rotrax to Tokyo I'll be removing the components from this frame and fitting most of them to that. Then selling it as it's too small for me. This frame is drilled for a rear brake but the hole is filled with a reflector as I've been riding it fixed.
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  21. #21
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Okay, so what I thought was a ball-ring turned out to be the driver, which has no threads but keys into the brake with 2 ramps. Attempting to undo the hub by locking the brake arm and forcing that would have damaged something for sure.

    This is the hub dismantled:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7628 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    I'd wondered what the square hole in the 2 Sachs spanners I have were for. And duh, had wondered why one end of the hub axle was squared. The hole is for locking the axle when you undo the knurled locknut on the brake arm side. I had to put the spanner in a vice to get the locknut undone. I've discovered that the only chrome loss on the hub is on the squared end, which suggests the hub might have been dismantled before:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7629 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Ah, yes! The 73 year-old grease... this shows how the brake arm end driver keys into the brake drum:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7632 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    And this shows how the drive-side driver keys into the brake drum via ramps - both these parts will dismantle further but I'll do that when the parts are clean and I can see exactly how they come apart and fit together:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7630 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  22. #22
    十人十色 Dawes-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    1,834
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Cleaned up, this hub reveals a couple of interesting things.

    It doesn't have a freewheel 'click', for one thing, as it doesn't have pawls like every other freewheel or hub I've ever taken apart, from a single-speed through freewheels to gear hubs like Sturmey Archer and Torpedo Duomatics. Instead, this hub has 5 rollers in the driver which protrude from gaps in a 'thrust collar', like this:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7638 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Under the collar, the rollers sit in ramped cut-outs:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7640 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    When freewheeling, the rollers go to the deepest part of the cut-out and sink out of contact with the inside of the hub:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7636 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    But when driven, the rollers go to the shallower part and are pushed outwards and into contact with the inside of the hub, turning it:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7637 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    For this reason, whereas Duomatic and SA hubs have thin shells that simply house the gear parts, the shell on this hub is an integral part of the hub's function and needs to be more substantial. The shell seems to be turned from a single piece of steel and it about 3 times as thick as an SA hub, for example. Rather expensive to manufacture, I should think.

    So that's the drive end. The brake end is also surprisingly simple. Inside the brass drum there is another part which combines the drive-roller principal, this time with just 2 rollers, one of which is just visible at the bottom in the photo below, and a brass collar with 2 tongues. At first I thought the tongues effected a brake but then saw the rollers so I'm left not sure what purpose the tongues serve, as they can't be strong enough to act as the brake...:
    [IMG]
    IMG_7635 by Dawes-man, on Flickr[/IMG]

    All together, a very nice bit of kit! Coincidentally, this is only the 2nd time I have come across this method of allowing something to turn freely one way, but taking up drive when turned the other. The other was an old Lucas bell, also from the 1930s, that used small balls instead of rollers and featured in another thread of mine I was completely baffled until Glennfordx4 revealed all and pointed out it was the same system as a Briggs & Stratton starter clutch.

    Now all that remains is for me to oil and grease the hub and then look forward to when I bring the Rotrax frame back to Tokyo and start the build. I'll probably start a new thread when that happens. Cheers me dears!
    "I bet you'd do the same if they was you." F. Zappa

  23. #23
    Hopelessly addicted... photogravity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Central Maryland
    My Bikes
    1949 Hercules Kestrel, 1950 Norman Rapide, 1970 Schwinn Collegiate, 1972 Peugeot UE-8, 1976 Raleigh Sports, 1977 Raleigh Sports, 1977 Jack Taylor Tandem, 1984 Davidson Tandem, 2010 Bilenky "BQ" 650B Constructeur Tandem, 2011 Linus Mixte
    Posts
    4,708
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    That is not only a beautiful bicycle frame, but also one gorgeous hub! I am really surprised that the hub is that pristine after all these years. I guess it is proof that they don't build them like they used to...
    --
    Ridding the world of derailleurs, one bicycle at a time.

    46 Hercules Roadster, 49 Hercules Kestrel, 50 Norman Rapide, 51 Hercules Lion, 52 Hercules Windsor, 56 Hercules Royal Prince, 61 Fiorelli Tandem, 67 Carlton Super Race (IGH), 70 Schwinn Collegiate (IGH), 71 Hercules, 71 STF Hercules, 72 Peugeot PX-8 (IGH), 76 Raleigh Sports, 77 STF Raleigh Sports, 77 Jack Taylor Tandem, Early-80's Mike Appel SC, 84 Davidson Tandem, Late-80's Alpine, 10 Bilenky "BQ" Signature Tandem

  24. #24
    likes to ride an old bike
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Madison
    Posts
    673
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow, Dawes-Man, that frame and hub are both *gorgeous*. Can't wait to see the build thread.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Captain Blight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis
    My Bikes
    -1973 Motobecane Mirage -197? Velosolex L'Etoile -'71 Raleigh Super Course
    Posts
    2,474
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    there really is nothing like that old supertoxic superpolluting cyanide-process chrome, is there? I'm jealous. I've got two Torpedo 3-speed hubs, but would really like a prewar Duomatic.
    '71 Raleigh Super Course ("Loose Change")
    '74 Raleigh Professional
    '7? VeloSolex L'Etoile rando build ("Chocolate Star")
    '77 Peugeot UE/O-8/10/9 mongrel
    '81 Trek 616
    '87 Trek 560 Pro Series
    '88 Schwinn Impact ("Burning Chrome")
    '92 Specialized Allez Comp
    '08 Specialized Crossroads winterbike ("Icicle the Bicycle")

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •