Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-08-12, 05:56 PM   #1
ftwelder
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ftwelder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: vermont
Bikes: Many
Posts: 3,092
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you know Ordinaries.

I don't. It's got a British headstock, the wrong rear wheel and what appears to be Columbia pedals. I browsed thousands of images and didn't see a saddle spring like that anywhere. Any ideas?


29 282 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr


29 284 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr


29 285 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr


29 283 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr
ftwelder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-12, 06:25 PM   #2
photogravity 
Hopelessly addicted...
 
photogravity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Central Maryland
Bikes: 1949 Hercules Kestrel, 1950 Norman Rapide, 1970 Schwinn Collegiate, 1972 Peugeot UE-8, 1976 Raleigh Sports, 1977 Raleigh Sports, 1977 Jack Taylor Tandem, 1984 Davidson Tandem, 2010 Bilenky "BQ" 650B Constructeur Tandem, 2011 Linus Mixte
Posts: 5,008
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It looks like an interesting steed... I agree about the rear wheel. It's doubtful that an alloy high flange hub would have been on an ordinary atmo. Here's to hoping that Blaise sticks his head in today and weighs in on this machine.
__________________
--
Ridding the world of derailleurs, one bicycle at a time.

46 Hercules Roadster, 49 Hercules Kestrel, 50 Norman Rapide, 51 Hercules Lion, 52 Hercules Windsor, 56 Hercules Royal Prince, 61 Fiorelli Tandem, 67 Carlton Super Race (IGH), 70 Schwinn Collegiate (IGH), 71 Hercules, 71 STF Hercules, 72 Peugeot PX-8 (IGH), 76 Raleigh Sports, 77 STF Raleigh Sports, 77 Jack Taylor Tandem, Early-80's Mike Appel SC, 84 Davidson Tandem, Late-80's Alpine, 10 Bilenky "BQ" Signature Tandem
photogravity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-12, 07:28 PM   #3
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
Posts: 17,042
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 62 Post(s)
Anyone who rides an ordinary has a lot more guts and coordination than I do.
__________________
"Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-12, 02:04 AM   #4
realestvin7 
Large Member
 
realestvin7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tejas
Bikes:
Posts: 2,733
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Schwinn Approved rear hub?
__________________
Build a drop bar do-it-all MTB!
For Sale / Trade:
1970's? Santa Maria F/F - Italian - 57cm ST/56cm TT
1988 Cannondale SM1000 MTB F/F 20" ST/ 56cm TT
Kuwahara Puma MTB F/F - 19" ST/56cm TT
Trek 7000 MTB F/F -17" ST/55cm TT
Alpine MTB F/F - 23" ST/59cm TT
Ross Hi-Tech MTB F/F - 20" - 21" ST/57cm TT
Peugeot PR10 Road F/F - 62.5cm ST/60cm TT
realestvin7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-12, 02:18 AM   #5
ftwelder
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ftwelder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: vermont
Bikes: Many
Posts: 3,092
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by John E View Post
Anyone who rides an ordinary has a lot more guts and coordination than I do.
They are pretty easy to ride. The mounting and dismounting are the tricky parts. If you get your knee stuck under the handlebar on the upstroke, you are finished. When dismounting, you jump off the back, avoiding the meat-hook that looks like a small step on the back of the frame.

Quote:
Originally Posted by realestvin7 View Post
Schwinn Approved rear hub?
I didn't spend much time looking at it. LOL
ftwelder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-12, 06:36 AM   #6
pastorbobnlnh 
Freewheel Medic
 
pastorbobnlnh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Ascending or Descending the NH Mountains NW of Concord!
Bikes: Snazzy* Schwinns, Classy Cannondales, & a Lonely '83 Santana Tandem (* Ed.)
Posts: 10,244
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Frank, where did you pick this gem up? You do seem to find the best jewels in our area!
__________________
Bob
Dreaming about riding in NH's summertime!

Visit my websites:
FreeWheelSpa.com orpastorbobnlnh.com
pastorbobnlnh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-12, 08:55 AM   #7
catmandew52
Senior Member
 
catmandew52's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: S. E. Michigan
Bikes:
Posts: 517
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
You may want to sign up here. http://www.thewheelmen.org/
They may be able to steer you in the correct direction.
catmandew52 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-12, 05:36 PM   #8
ftwelder
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ftwelder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: vermont
Bikes: Many
Posts: 3,092
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh View Post
Frank, where did you pick this gem up? You do seem to find the best jewels in our area!
It doesn't belong to me though I am hopeful. I have been looking for one for a while now. I came across a velocipede in the woods in California about 25 years ago. I think about that thing once in a while.

Quote:
Originally Posted by catmandew52 View Post
You may want to sign up here. http://www.thewheelmen.org/
They may be able to steer you in the correct direction.
I am a member as well as a member of Veterans Cycle Club. The two times I have ridden these bicycles were due to the generosity of Wheelmen members. It's a big deal considering the pedals run around $500/pr.

Last edited by ftwelder; 01-09-12 at 05:47 PM.
ftwelder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-12, 09:22 AM   #9
tony colegrave
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 116
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ordinary bike.

Judging by the shallow dropped bars and the fairly simple front wheel bearings, I'd guess that this is a machine from the early 1880s which has had both wheels replaced or re-spoked.
The rear wheel is clearly a (relatively) very modern replacement, and it's not uncommon to find these bikes with a totally replaced rear wheel, as the stresses imposed on them can be very considerable.
The front wheel appears to have it's original hub, which would almost certainly have been radially-spoked originally - the 'hairpin'-type tangental spokes are accomodated in holes drilled into the base of the flanges, which is something that I've never seen in 'original' tangent wheels. I suspect that you'll find evidence of the original threaded spoke holes drilled into the edges of the flanges.
The spring is a typical version of Harrington's Arab Cradle pattern, which was available in c.1885 in various configurations to suit both bicycles and tricycles (and, later, solid-tyred safeties), and this would probably have replaced an earlier leaf spring - there might be evidence of the fitting of some sort of bracket on the backbone, to encompass the 'tail' of such a spring, and the remains of it's original attachment at the head is evident in the close-up picture.
tony colegrave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-12, 01:03 PM   #10
treebound 
aka: Mike J.
 
treebound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: between Milwaukee and Sheboygan in Wisconsin
Bikes: 1995 Trek 520 is the current primary bike.
Posts: 3,034
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Is the backbone supposed to be touching the front wheel?

I saw a guy riding one once going over Donner Pass in California, it was snowing and there he was powering up the hill eastbound on the shoulder of the freeway. I've wanted one ever since, even before that, but I've heard the newer ones don't match up to the older ones unless you pay a very pretty penny. There's a group who ride them around the Milwaukee WI area.
__________________
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
Life happens, don't be a spectator.
treebound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-12, 05:47 PM   #11
ftwelder
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ftwelder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: vermont
Bikes: Many
Posts: 3,092
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tony colegrave View Post
Judging by the shallow dropped bars and the fairly simple front wheel bearings, I'd guess that this is a machine from the early 1880s which has had both wheels replaced or re-spoked.
The rear wheel is clearly a (relatively) very modern replacement, and it's not uncommon to find these bikes with a totally replaced rear wheel, as the stresses imposed on them can be very considerable.
The front wheel appears to have it's original hub, which would almost certainly have been radially-spoked originally - the 'hairpin'-type tangental spokes are accomodated in holes drilled into the base of the flanges, which is something that I've never seen in 'original' tangent wheels. I suspect that you'll find evidence of the original threaded spoke holes drilled into the edges of the flanges.
The spring is a typical version of Harrington's Arab Cradle pattern, which was available in c.1885 in various configurations to suit both bicycles and tricycles (and, later, solid-tyred safeties), and this would probably have replaced an earlier leaf spring - there might be evidence of the fitting of some sort of bracket on the backbone, to encompass the 'tail' of such a spring, and the remains of it's original attachment at the head is evident in the close-up picture.
Thank you sir, I should have the bike in my hands tomorrow..I was told the hub may be bronze and have two rows of ball bearings? The closest thing I have seen to this bike is a Surrey Machinist' that was said to be equipped with BSA components though I am not sure as I have a few Surrey machines in catalogs and none looked like this.

The guy who rebuilt this machine 20 years ago rolled that rear rim down from a 700C. The wheel on the bike as he received it was from a garden cart or something, not a bike wheel.

I found a ton of new information (for me) searching that saddle brand. Thank you again.

I will report back on my findings tomorrow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by treebound View Post
Is the backbone supposed to be touching the front wheel?

I saw a guy riding one once going over Donner Pass in California, it was snowing and there he was powering up the hill eastbound on the shoulder of the freeway. I've wanted one ever since, even before that, but I've heard the newer ones don't match up to the older ones unless you pay a very pretty penny. There's a group who ride them around the Milwaukee WI area.
HA! No one said bent fork! Well, you almost did..

I only have 15 mins of saddle time total for my life. At this point it's still pretty frightening.

Last edited by ftwelder; 01-10-12 at 07:05 PM.
ftwelder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-12, 07:52 PM   #12
old's'cool 
curmudgineer
 
old's'cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Chicago SW burbs
Bikes: 2 many 2 fit here
Posts: 3,692
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
If you're not scared, you don't get it.
__________________
Geoff
"I think that I think, therefore I think that I am"
old's'cool is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-12, 06:32 PM   #13
ftwelder
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ftwelder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: vermont
Bikes: Many
Posts: 3,092
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by old's'cool View Post
If you're not scared, you don't get it.
I got it.


29 311 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr


29 312 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr


29 313 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr


29 322 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr


29 323 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr


29 334 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr


29 337 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr


29 345 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr


29 346 by barnstormerbikes, on Flickr
ftwelder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-12, 06:32 PM   #14
tony colegrave
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 116
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If the 'hairpin'-type tangental spokes are original to the front wheel, this cycle could well be a Surrey Machinist's one, as they were just about the only successful proponents of this style of wheelbuilding.
I've looked through the various issues of Griffin's 'Bicycles of the Year' publications, and have found an illustration of the S.M. 1885 Invincible Roadster which shows a remarkable similarity to this cycle - even being fitted with the Arab Cradle spring as standard!
Surrey Machinist cycles are amongst the most highly regarded models of the period. The wheels were customarily fitted with an unusual pattern of hollow rim of exceptional strength (which no doubt helped to overcome the perceived defect of their spoking system), but it's not clear from the photos whether the rim on this wheel is one such.
tony colegrave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-12, 06:38 PM   #15
wahoonc
Senior Member
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
Posts: 16,687
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Interesting...and congratulations on the acquisition of another project

I have access to a repro Ordinary that I occasionally borrow to ride at the local Dickens Festival.

Curiosity question, is that rust pimples under the paint or has some misguided person sand blasted it in the past?

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-12, 10:07 PM   #16
blaise_f
Senior Member
 
blaise_f's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Phoenix
Bikes: Surly Trucker
Posts: 627
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've been away from BF for a little bit - busy with leather and life - but saw your posts on The Wheelmen. Mid / early 80s. Obviously Euro, probably English, as you've already discerned. Looks to be spider laced spokes? The bars don't look to thread out, is that right? That could mean a bit earlier than later. Columbia pedals isn't a shock. Pedals were a very often swapped item. Feet of the 1880s were small, and typical pedals didn't fit a larger person. They also wore out, and were easily replaced. It could be that it was made in the US or imported here, without the pedals (a common-ish thing for Victor bikes). What's the deal with the pant guard? Does it look like the two bars ever connected? From the discussion over yonder, it seems to me it could easily be a Surrey one off, or non-typical build of theirs. There's a lot of information from that time that we have lost as time has gone by.

I like the bike a lot. Unique touches.




Aaron: It's likely this bike has been blasted and repainted, which is where the pitting comes from. Casts back then weren't amazing anyway, though.
blaise_f is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-12, 03:04 AM   #17
ftwelder
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ftwelder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: vermont
Bikes: Many
Posts: 3,092
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by blaise_f View Post
I've been away from BF for a little bit - busy with leather and life - but saw your posts on The Wheelmen. Mid / early 80s. Obviously Euro, probably English, as you've already discerned. Looks to be spider laced spokes? The bars don't look to thread out, is that right? That could mean a bit earlier than later. Columbia pedals isn't a shock. Pedals were a very often swapped item. Feet of the 1880s were small, and typical pedals didn't fit a larger person. They also wore out, and were easily replaced. It could be that it was made in the US or imported here, without the pedals (a common-ish thing for Victor bikes). What's the deal with the pant guard? Does it look like the two bars ever connected? From the discussion over yonder, it seems to me it could easily be a Surrey one off, or non-typical build of theirs. There's a lot of information from that time that we have lost as time has gone by.

I like the bike a lot. Unique touches.




Aaron: It's likely this bike has been blasted and repainted, which is where the pitting comes from. Casts back then weren't amazing anyway, though.
Thanks! The frame seems to have some original paint. The guy who last had it is my new hero. He just painted over the old paint (what little hadn't been lost to rust) with red with black being the original color. I also learned that when the bike was found, had cloth-covered spokes also. The rim looks to be the same as the Surrey Invincible on wheelmen.

Parts of the bike were extremely rusty and pitted. It had been in a basement with the rim submerged in mud, resulting in a piece being spliced in to replace the missing section.

The handlebars have a hex on the end that connects to the stem. I didn't see threads however.

The pant guard seems to be unmolested and two separate rods. There is not much room between the tire and frame.

I wonder how difficult it will be to fine about 12" of 120 year old steel rim?

That big ole' bronze hub is sure pretty AND I have tire spook part of the brake. Ill bet I will find a handle under the floorboards in my shop?

Last edited by ftwelder; 01-12-12 at 03:11 AM.
ftwelder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-12, 06:50 AM   #18
pastorbobnlnh 
Freewheel Medic
 
pastorbobnlnh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Ascending or Descending the NH Mountains NW of Concord!
Bikes: Snazzy* Schwinns, Classy Cannondales, & a Lonely '83 Santana Tandem (* Ed.)
Posts: 10,244
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Frank! Wow! I need to schedule a visit next week. I need to see this baby in person!

It's interesting how in this era the frame tube was joined to the head tube with this flat piece. Below is the 1892 Coventry Safety I found at the Stump Dump.



And here is your Ordinary. Different design but similar technique.



Of course the tubing on these old beauties was really thick! I guess this made for the strongest joint? If you had been on C&V when I found this, I might have kept it or worked a deal with you and Laney.

__________________
Bob
Dreaming about riding in NH's summertime!

Visit my websites:
FreeWheelSpa.com orpastorbobnlnh.com
pastorbobnlnh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-12, 10:19 AM   #19
blaise_f
Senior Member
 
blaise_f's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Phoenix
Bikes: Surly Trucker
Posts: 627
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ftwelder View Post
Thanks! The frame seems to have some original paint. The guy who last had it is my new hero. He just painted over the old paint (what little hadn't been lost to rust) with red with black being the original color. I also learned that when the bike was found, had cloth-covered spokes also. The rim looks to be the same as the Surrey Invincible on wheelmen.

Parts of the bike were extremely rusty and pitted. It had been in a basement with the rim submerged in mud, resulting in a piece being spliced in to replace the missing section.

The handlebars have a hex on the end that connects to the stem. I didn't see threads however.

The pant guard seems to be unmolested and two separate rods. There is not much room between the tire and frame.

I wonder how difficult it will be to fine about 12" of 120 year old steel rim?

That big ole' bronze hub is sure pretty AND I have tire spook part of the brake. Ill bet I will find a handle under the floorboards in my shop?
Custom-fab is going to be your quickest route. A whole wheel comes up for sale maybe once a year. Trashed rims generally disappear, though I've seen parts bikes with feet of rim missing; anything is possible. 19th century bike stuff comes down to two categories (when restoring them): 1) Riders, 2) Originals. A rider would get any old brake setup and rim slapped on - this can be done on the quick. An original could take your whole life to find replacement parts.

The pant guard is interesting to me, as with many details on this bike. It's really a great find. A tiny bit will get it riding. A whole new world exists behind the door of ordinaries
blaise_f is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-12, 05:48 AM   #20
ftwelder
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ftwelder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: vermont
Bikes: Many
Posts: 3,092
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have this weird kind of luck when it comes to finding bikes. Someone gave me a complete set of Whitworth tools, then a few weeks later, my first Rudge showed up. I found a old wood box of Torrington spokes and weeks later, the Nashua came to stay and needed spokes and I had a box of originals in the correct size.

I knew when the truck backed up to my door with a 100 year old, 3,000 lb, (rim) rolling machine, I had to accept it (it's 1/2 the size of a car). The message I am getting from this machine "forget buying a rim, prepare to make one, I am your new friend".
ftwelder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-12, 07:27 AM   #21
pastorbobnlnh 
Freewheel Medic
 
pastorbobnlnh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Ascending or Descending the NH Mountains NW of Concord!
Bikes: Snazzy* Schwinns, Classy Cannondales, & a Lonely '83 Santana Tandem (* Ed.)
Posts: 10,244
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ftwelder View Post
I have this weird kind of luck when it comes to finding bikes. Someone gave me a complete set of Whitworth tools, then a few weeks later, my first Rudge showed up. I found a old wood box of Torrington spokes and weeks later, the Nashua came to stay and needed spokes and I had a box of originals in the correct size.

I knew when the truck backed up to my door with a 100 year old, 3,000 lb, (rim) rolling machine, I had to accept it (it's 1/2 the size of a car). The message I am getting from this machine "forget buying a rim, prepare to make one, I am your new friend".
You are, The bike whisperer!

Frank, I had a premonition yesterday that you would fabricate your own replacement rim.

When you first ride it, I want to be there with my video camera so we can post a video here. We just need to make certain we find you a period correct costume to wear. One cool shot would be the local BMX kids riding circles around you as you stately go down main street. Another would be to take it across the river into NH and film you with the old railroad cars in the background.
__________________
Bob
Dreaming about riding in NH's summertime!

Visit my websites:
FreeWheelSpa.com orpastorbobnlnh.com
pastorbobnlnh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-12, 08:16 AM   #22
Italuminium
Cisalpinist
 
Italuminium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Holland
Bikes: blue ones.
Posts: 5,557
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh View Post
You are, The bike whisperer!

Frank, I had a premonition yesterday that you would fabricate your own replacement rim.

When you first ride it, I want to be there with my video camera so we can post a video here. We just need to make certain we find you a period correct costume to wear. One cool shot would be the local BMX kids riding circles around you as you stately go down main street. Another would be to take it across the river into NH and film you with the old railroad cars in the background.
Looking forward to that film!
Italuminium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-12, 12:32 PM   #23
blaise_f
Senior Member
 
blaise_f's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Phoenix
Bikes: Surly Trucker
Posts: 627
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So you have your confirmation.

Quote:
The boys on the other side of the pond say Surrey Machinists Co Invincible
blaise_f is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-12, 07:58 PM   #24
ftwelder
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ftwelder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: vermont
Bikes: Many
Posts: 3,092
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh View Post
You are, The bike whisperer!

Frank, I had a premonition yesterday that you would fabricate your own replacement rim.

When you first ride it, I want to be there with my video camera so we can post a video here. We just need to make certain we find you a period correct costume to wear. One cool shot would be the local BMX kids riding circles around you as you stately go down main street. Another would be to take it across the river into NH and film you with the old railroad cars in the background.
It's not all that easy to get one one of the things and get going. I am actually going to train for the occasion. The peg is about knee height and I can just reach the bars. I am not sure about the camera and costume but you can come by and spot me, I will need two people. I mounted a 56" a couple of times but the first would have been a crash without a spotter. This old girl is a 58".

Quote:
Originally Posted by blaise_f View Post
So you have your confirmation.

Thanks! I am just gushing right now.

Last edited by ftwelder; 01-13-12 at 08:02 PM.
ftwelder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-12, 08:35 PM   #25
oberthecat 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Mishawaka Indiana
Bikes: 1985 & 1986 Schwinn Peloton, 1986 Schwinn Super Sport, 1985 Schwinn Super Le Tour, 1973 silver Schwinn P13 Pamanount 1972 Chrome Schwinn P13 Paramount
Posts: 226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Very interesting machine. It always makes me wonder what people 130 yrs from now will have to ride from now.
oberthecat is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:03 AM.