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Old 01-23-12, 09:12 AM   #1
silvercreek
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Identifing thread type on Campagnolo Tipo hubs

I've got a set of Campagnolo Tipo hubs that I can not determine the threads on the rear hub. I do not have a freewheel to use and was wondering if there is a way to identify the type of threads on a hub without a matching freewheel. How many different threads could possibly be on these hubs?

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Old 01-23-12, 09:17 AM   #2
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They're almost certainly either Italian or English. If Italian, I belive the there will be a line around the lip that butts up to the freewheel threading. At the end of the day, though, it really doesn't matter as the threading was so close. Just use an English threaded freewheel and don't go back to Italian.

And don't go threading on freewheels to bare hubs.
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Old 01-23-12, 09:23 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by ColonelJLloyd View Post
They're almost certainly either Italian or English. If Italian, I belive the there will be a line around the lip that butts up to the freewheel threading. At the end of the day, though, it really doesn't matter as the threading was so close. Just use an English threaded freewheel and don't go back to Italian.

And don't go threading on freewheels to bare hubs.
I inherited these hubs in a bunch of bicycle parts that one of my uncles had. There is a shallow grove or line as you call it where a freewheel would go.

Thanks for the help.
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Old 01-23-12, 09:47 AM   #4
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The Colonel is probably right Silvercreek, but I'd be careful. That pic is hard to see and frankly, I don't see the groove mentioned. Is it just me? This hub was made with French threads too, though they are not as common.
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Old 01-23-12, 11:31 AM   #5
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Actually, I believe the inscribed groove indicates an English thread standard, which makes sense when you think about it. Campagnolo is Italian and most of their sales are to Italian manufacturers who would specify Italian threads. Adding the groove is extra cost and they would want to use it to designate a thread standard with a lower volume of sales, to mitigate the impact of the extra manufacturing operation on the profit.

Regardless, as stated, English and Italian freewheel threading is compatible with only minor damage resulting to the threads. Unless the OP is a very strong cyclist or changes back and forth between English and Italian threaded freewheels, there should be no issue.
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Old 01-23-12, 11:38 AM   #6
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Actually, I believe the inscribed groove indicates an English thread standard, which makes sense when you think about it. Campagnolo is Italian and most of their sales are to Italian manufacturers who would specify Italian threads. Adding the groove is extra cost and they would want to use it to designate a thread standard with a lower volume of sales, to mitigate the impact of the extra manufacturing operation on the profit.

Regardless, as stated, English and Italian freewheel threading is compatible with only minor damage resulting to the threads. Unless the OP is a very strong cyclist or changes back and forth between English and Italian threaded freewheels, there should be no issue.
The groove is indeed English. This gets confused as Campagnolo did not always do this, and it was before they started stamping the thread pitch, and English and Italian are close enough that many did not know... the difference is that while the pitch is the same essentially, the inclusive angle of the thread is different, one is 60 the other is 55, and I forget which is which. If I remember English on Italian is a bit loose, and Italian on English knocks off a wee bit of material, so Italians get 55 .
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Old 01-23-12, 01:14 PM   #7
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Try threading a bottom bracket adjustable cup lockring on there. English bottom bracket shells have the same threading as English freewheels.
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Old 01-23-12, 04:39 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by silvercreek View Post
I inherited these hubs in a bunch of bicycle parts that one of my uncles had. There is a shallow grove or line as you call it where a freewheel would go.

Thanks for the help.
A groove would indicate English thread:

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Old 01-23-12, 04:47 PM   #9
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You guys are correct. The Tipo does have an english thread. I took a look at my set of Campagnolo NR hubs and they also have the grove and I know those have english threads.

I don't know how I ended up with a freewheel that will not screw on. I guess it must either be French or Italian huh?

Thanks guys for helping me clear that up.
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Old 01-23-12, 05:08 PM   #10
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Italian ought to go on OK SC. French? That could be trouble.
Best to ditch that sucker
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Old 01-23-12, 05:21 PM   #11
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And don't go threading on freewheels to bare hubs.
Excellent advice!!! Even if the threads catch a little bit, it might be too much for removal. Been there.
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Old 01-23-12, 06:00 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by silvercreek View Post
I inherited these hubs in a bunch of bicycle parts that one of my uncles had. There is a shallow grove or line as you call it where a freewheel would go.

Thanks for the help.
The single groove means British threads, though. No groove MIGHT be Italian, or French, or even British if the hub is old enough.

Initially, Campagnolo put no markings on the rear (Record) hubs for threading type. Then they went to the single groove for BSC (no groove could still be Italian or French during that time period), then they eventually went with the very complete call-outs around the freewheel mounting surface for the three types. But I'm not sure whether Tipo hubs did exactly the same thing (I guess I would guess that they did, however).

Last edited by 753proguy; 01-23-12 at 06:03 PM. Reason: dang spellin'
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Old 01-23-12, 06:09 PM   #13
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Groovy discussion....

sorry.
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Old 01-23-12, 10:36 PM   #14
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The single groove means British threads, though. No groove MIGHT be Italian, or French, or even British if the hub is old enough.

Initially, Campagnolo put no markings on the rear (Record) hubs for threading type. Then they went to the single groove for BSC (no groove could still be Italian or French during that time period), then they eventually went with the very complete call-outs around the freewheel mounting surface for the three types. But I'm not sure whether Tipo hubs did exactly the same thing (I guess I would guess that they did, however).
Both French and Italian lacked the groove. But an Italian freewheel wouldn't even engage the threads on a French thread hub, and a French thread freewheel couldn't even begin to thread onto an Italian hub, so it wasn't really an issue.
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Old 01-24-12, 05:27 AM   #15
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But an Italian freewheel wouldn't even engage the threads on a French thread hub, .
Ah, but, I'll bet there have been numerous hub bosses ruined anyway.
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Old 01-24-12, 05:35 AM   #16
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Ah, but, I'll bet there have been numerous hub bosses ruined anyway.
I have one........dam shame to. Now I have a spare axle and races.
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Old 01-24-12, 09:29 AM   #17
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What model of Campagnolo hub is this? It has England 1370" x 24 t.p.i. BSC thread description on it. This hub has 11 holes around the hub unlike the 8 holes on the other set of hubs in the picture above. This one has an approximate 127mm dropout spacing. It had a heck of a freewheel on it at one time.


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Old 01-24-12, 12:22 PM   #18
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What model of Campagnolo hub is this? It has England 1370" x 24 t.p.i. BSC thread description on it. This hub has 11 holes around the hub unlike the 8 holes on the other set of hubs in the picture above.
That's a high-flange "Tipo" hub with a mis-matched skewer (probably Triomphe or Victory).
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Old 01-24-12, 07:03 PM   #19
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On the original set of wheels from my Gitane TdF, the Tipo hub is French threaded. That surprised the crap out of me, I didn't know Campy had French threaded hubs, but I do now!
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