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  1. #1
    Senior Member himespau's Avatar
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    couple quick questions about building up a vintage frame (paint touch up and bb)

    I have a vintage frame I want to build up. The paint is in pretty bad shape and I want to touch it up to protect it from rust. Got some primer and paint (went with flat black rustoleum as the frame is flat black and I don't need a perfect match as I'm not going for a full restore).

    The fork also needs a little touching up and is chromed under the paint. I've heard some people say that the chroming was used instead of primer. Does that mean I won't need to prime that before putting touch up paint on it, or should I still touch it up?

    Also, I've never used rustoleum before (or any paint for metal). What thinner do I use for cleanup? Is the tin of mineral spirits I have laying around good enough?

    On to the bb question. I've seen a number of people (including Sheldon Brown) recommend a cover for the cup and cone type bb. Was at the lbs last night looking for one and only one of the guys knew what I was talking about and he said they didn't have any, but it didn't matter because they don't do any good. To qualify him as a source of information, he also told me that you can't buy new cup and cone bb's (something I did a month or two ago), so I'm not sure how much I can trust him about older bike parts (his response when I was looking for dropout adaptor claws for bikes without RD hangers was I should just buy a cheap RD that came with the claw - though they did eventually find me a couple of heuret claws in a back drawer).

    Was he right? Are the bb covers not really useful, or is it something I should look for (at another source)?
    Punctuation is important. It's the difference between "I helped my uncle, Jack, off a horse" and "I helped my uncle Jack off a horse"


  2. #2
    Senior Member auchencrow's Avatar
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    In my experience no paint sticks all that well to chrome (thus the reason why you are repairing the chips) but you are fortunate that it's an easy color to match. On the other hand, paint seems to stick well enough until the next time.

    It is best to read the instructions on the can for what to use when cleaning up.

    Regarding the bb question, many people like them (including Sheldon) so I'm really on thin ice by saying this, but personally, I dislike those accordion thingies.

    Every time I remove one it seems there is a lot of dirt and grit accumulating at the ends, exactly where I don't want it.
    - Instead of reinstalling it, I make sure that the seat post is closed (with a cork if need be) to keep additional foreign matter from entering, and I place a little extra grease at the bottom of the bb shell to trap those stray particles away from the bearings.
    - Auchen

  3. #3
    Senior Member Old Yeller's Avatar
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    I think the bottom bracket sleeves are a must with bottom bracket cut outs.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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    Mineral spirits will be fine. It's also known as paint thinner.

  5. #5
    Senior Member himespau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auchencrow View Post

    It is best to read the instructions on the can for what to use when cleaning up.
    Duh, good point. Of course I should read the instructions, but for some reason that never occurs to me until I screw something up.


    Quote Originally Posted by auchencrow View Post
    Regarding the bb question, many people like them (including Sheldon) so I'm really on thin ice by saying this, but personally, I dislike those accordion thingies.

    Every time I remove one it seems there is a lot of dirt and grit accumulating at the ends, exactly where I don't want it.
    - Instead of reinstalling it, I make sure that the seat post is closed (with a cork if need be) to keep additional foreign matter from entering, and I place a little extra grease at the bottom of the bb shell to trap those stray particles away from the bearings.
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Yeller View Post
    I think the bottom bracket sleeves are a must with bottom bracket cut outs.
    This frame lacks cut outs, so maybe I'll be ok to go without after I spray some framesaver in there. I think the seatpost is closed enough that it shouldn't let any dirt in that way, but I can check.


    For just little touch up work like this, are those foam brushes the best or an actual brush with hair? In the past (pretty much only wood painting/staining) the disposable foam brushes worked well for me with less stroke marks.
    Punctuation is important. It's the difference between "I helped my uncle, Jack, off a horse" and "I helped my uncle Jack off a horse"


  6. #6
    Senior Member auchencrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by himespau View Post
    ...
    For just little touch up work like this, are those foam brushes the best or an actual brush with hair? In the past (pretty much only wood painting/staining) the disposable foam brushes worked well for me with less stroke marks.
    Foam brushes are recommended for latex paint on flat surfaces - they don't do so well on curved surfaces. Also, some solvents in non-latex paints can attack the foam. If you want to test it, don't test it on your bike first or it could become a sticky mess.

    The way to eliminate stroke marks is to have the proper consistency and temperature at application. You may have to use thinner (read instructions) if it is too viscous.
    Brush paint jobs done right can look really good - in some cases rivaling factory paint.
    Last edited by auchencrow; 02-15-12 at 05:40 PM. Reason: tpyo
    - Auchen

  7. #7
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\ SumoMuffin's Avatar
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    You might consider just stripping the paint off the fork and leaving it chrome, you might have some perfect chrome under there. Chrome forks IMO are the cat's pajamas.

  8. #8
    Senior Member auchencrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SumoMuffin View Post
    You might consider just stripping the paint off the fork and leaving it chrome, you might have some perfect chrome under there. Chrome forks IMO are the cat's pajamas.
    Generally the chrome under factory paint is not polished to an acceptable aesthetic standard. You don't want to remove the paint and then see that is the case.

    Also, on vintage bikes that were not originally equipped with an all chromed fork, their presence negates originality and suggests that the fork is an unpainted service item, possibly with concomitant front end/frame damage.
    - Auchen

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