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  1. #826
    You gonna eat that? Doohickie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
    too loose and you could loose that proprietary, no longer made, nut.
    If you tighten the lock nut against the hex nut on the left side, the torque of the bolt into the hex nut (and thus friction of the lever) has no effect. It can totally slack and the lock nut will lock. That's it's purpose.
    I stop for people / whose right of way I honor / but not for no one.



    Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."

  2. #827
    Senior Member Chris Chicago's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doohickie View Post
    The friction force on a Suntour Barcon is adjustable by tightening or loosening the screw on the right side. That is why there is a lock nut on the left side- to hold the friction force at the adjusted value.

    Friction force required is very much a function of the derailleur. On my Nishiki I have Suntour Barcons and the are fairly "loose" (easy to shift). I have a modern-ish rear derailleur that is designed for indexed shifting. I also have Suntour Barcons on my '83 Raleigh Super Course. The RD is a Suntour Cyclone and it requires much more friction force to hold it in place, so I have the same issue you're having- a little too tight feeling. I'm considering swapping out the RD and see if it gets better (the bike came with a Suntour aRX RD; I may put that on). But regarding your concern about how much friction you need to hold position, I think that is driven by the leverage in the parallelogram of the RD and the spring force of the RD.

    If I get around to changing out the RD on my Super Course and get a better feel, I'll let you know.
    thanks Doohickie, that was helpful for me to sort it out in my head. It would seem that my rd has a strong spring that requires a lot of tightening in the barcon..due to 1)when barcon is a nice loosey goosey rd pulls itself onto smaller cogs. 2)when barcon is tight enough to hold rd still, it takes more pressure than I'd like to move barcon.

    rd is a suntour vxgt

    Quote Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
    If you are not a tool hound like me, any shop should be able to give it a quick check and straighten it for a modest cost.
    good idea, but just called and 20 bucks at the shop. I'd pay it if they hadnt bungled stuff for me in the past. Probably just buy that toolio on ebay you linked. appreciate the help.
    Last edited by Chris Chicago; 01-25-13 at 02:34 PM.

  3. #828
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doohickie View Post
    The friction force on a Suntour Barcon is adjustable by tightening or loosening the screw on the right side. That is why there is a lock nut on the left side- to hold the friction force at the adjusted value.

    Friction force required is very much a function of the derailleur. On my Nishiki I have Suntour Barcons and the are fairly "loose" (easy to shift). I have a modern-ish rear derailleur that is designed for indexed shifting. I also have Suntour Barcons on my '83 Raleigh Super Course. The RD is a Suntour Cyclone and it requires much more friction force to hold it in place, so I have the same issue you're having- a little too tight feeling. I'm considering swapping out the RD and see if it gets better (the bike came with a Suntour aRX RD; I may put that on). But regarding your concern about how much friction you need to hold position, I think that is driven by the leverage in the parallelogram of the RD and the spring force of the RD.

    If I get around to changing out the RD on my Super Course and get a better feel, I'll let you know.
    I have found that the Cyclone usually works really well with Barcons if all the respective parts are in good condition... the Cyclone does not have the same return tension as an NOS Suntour Vx and found these can challenge a less then perfect Barcon to hold their position. With that being said, the Vx is about as bombproof a derailleur that was ever made and it is also beautiful and lightweight.

    The slickest set up I am running is a Suntour Barcon with a SRAM X5... the action is freakishly light and the X5 is there to handle what are some extreme gearing ranges on my touring bikes. It is a nice mix of vintage and modern.

  4. #829
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Chicago View Post

    rd is a suntour vxgt


    This is the problem I alluded to in my last post... have only had issues with the Vx when the derailleur was NOS and the Barcons had seen some mileage and when I switched the NOS Vx to an older Vx the problem went away.

  5. #830
    Senior Member Bikedued's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KOBE View Post
    I know it's not quite vintage yet (1998), but I never knew Rivendell made these. One just went for $2500 on the auction site, so it at least held it's value.

    http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...e#.UQKiY_K8CSo

    I think that is in my top 5 of most gorgeous bikes I've ever seen. Fantastic looking bike, thanks for posting it!! The ONLY possible way it could be better, is with some dark skinwall Specialized street tires(not made anymore) and maybe a Honey Pro..,,,,BD
    "Whale. Oil. Beef. Hooked!" The Rumjacks

  6. #831
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
    Ah, but there's a reason the front mudflap goes (or should go) that low.
    I know they need to go low but it was a bit excessive on the moto. I think the long forward sweep of the fork (compared to newer bikes) rotates the fender back and down a bit more than it should be. I considered removing flipping and reriviting the mounting bracket at the fork crown but I liked the location of the top/front of the fender. I only removed 2.5 inches from the bottom and remounted the rubber flap so that in drops vertically instead of recurving along the tire. it looks better and still offers excellent protection.
    I know, I know I need a pic but the bike is at work waiting for the weather to warm up so I can commute again. and I keep forgetting to take a pic.

    royal

  7. #832
    Senior Member Creme Brulee's Avatar
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    I wish schwalbe still made those tires

  8. #833
    Senior Member neo_pop_71's Avatar
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    My buddy has a very similar Rivendell to that beauty on page 33... it gets so much attention from other riders (and people in general) that he's taken to calling the attention "Rivendrool". Also, let's not forget the old line from elementary school "Look with your eyes and not with your hands" 'cuz people are always leaving finger prints and laying their hands all over the bike
    I'd rather add more life to my years, than years to my life.

  9. #834
    Senior Member calstar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neo_pop_71 View Post
    ..
    Rivendell.... "look with your eyes and not with your hands" 'cuz people are always leaving finger prints and laying their hands all over the bike
    The next thing you know some audacious road grime, dirt, dust,water, etc., will think it can attach itself to the bike. How dare they, don't these particles know this is a C&V bike never to be sullied by such commoners as themselves?
    "The older I get the better I was" (from Old Guys Rule t-shirt)

  10. #835
    Senior Member
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    I never thought bicycles were meant to be heirlooms. Although if I had a bona fide WTB Phoenix you can bet your backside it'd become one.....

  11. #836
    Senior Member Bikedued's Avatar
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    Did Motobecane make any mountain bikes, before the big DT logo'd name revival? I bet if they had, they'd be something to behold. If I ever get into frame building ( a dream for much of my adult life) I would LOVE to build a mtb/atb frame in the style of my mid 70's Grand Record. Gold striped Nervex lugs, red/black paint, and a TA triple. It would have bullmoose bars of course, and cantilever brakes wide enough to act as air brakes, hehe.,,,,BD
    "Whale. Oil. Beef. Hooked!" The Rumjacks

  12. #837
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    Just did this Bianchi Grizzly conversion this weekend:

    Before:



    After:

  13. #838
    weirdo
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    Mmm... Grizzly.
    My favorite flavor mtb
    How about some close ups?

  14. #839
    Senior Member calstar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bone Machine View Post
    Just did this Bianchi Grizzly conversion this weekend:

    Before:



    After:
    Any issues for you when riding on the hoods, looks like quite a bit of added reach/stretch to an already long tt? Very slick looking Grizzly.
    "The older I get the better I was" (from Old Guys Rule t-shirt)

  15. #840
    Senior Member DVC45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RFC View Post


    Is that a Feinwerkbau or Pardini?

    I like!

  16. #841
    one life on two wheels cobrabyte's Avatar
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    Took my Rockhopper out for a ride today before I set it up for my tour next month. Here's some pics of the current setup:



    And since pictures are fun, here's some pics of the new stuff going on. Starting up the new build this afternoon. Swapping out the WTB dirtdrops for Nitto Noodle bars, adding a rear rack and panniers, a second bottle cage, toe clips & straps, and fenders. I may not install the fenders until the rainy season starts here in the summer. We barely *** a few drops during this time of year. I decided on these Gilles Berthoud stainless steel fenders since both the seatstay and chainstay bridge are threaded for this type of fender intallation:

    Nitto Noodles: (I also couldn't resist the cool blue NOS Nitto stem, but I won't be using that for this build.)

    Touring gear:





  17. #842
    hi YoKev's Avatar
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    ^^sweet!

  18. #843
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    Cut over 2 pounds off my Cimmaron by swapping out wheels and tires. As pictured, it weighed in at 28.8 pounds. Wheels and 7 speed came from Deseret Industries (Mormon version of Goodwill) for $4.

    Took it out for a shake out ride, up the big freakin hill by city hall. I really like that bike.

    My Univega Alpina Pro weighed in at 27.4 pounds. I believe the tires, saddle and pedals on the Univega are lighter weight. And the Univega has 1.25 inch tires, vs 1.5 inch. Components are almost identical.

    Of course, the Univega has an 18 1/2 inch frame, and the Schwinn has a 21 inch frame (I need to double check that).




    I need to clean that back porch at the workshop.





    bill
    Last edited by wrk101; 01-28-13 at 07:16 AM.

  19. #844
    Chainstay Brake Mafia
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
    Cut over 2 pounds off my Cimmaron by swapping out wheels and tires.
    what wheels did you have before? your old tires are the same ones i've got on my drop bar bike and also want to swap them out cause they are so heavy... though they can handle almost anything without flatting
    1986 Diamondback Apex ~ 1988 Diamondback Ascent EX ~ 1989 Jamis Dakar ~ 1989 Specialized Stumpjumper Comp
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  20. #845
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    The wheels are Weinmann rims with Shimano STX/Parallax hubs. They have 6/7 speed freehub, came with a cassette, that is working just fine. The former wheels were the original anodized rims with Suntour XC hubs (freewheel rear).
    See some of my bikes on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/BillsVintageSteelBikes

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  21. #846
    rain dog mainstreetexile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
    The wheels are Weinmann rims with Shimano STX/Parallax hubs. They have 6/7 speed freehub, came with a cassette, that is working just fine. The former wheels were the original anodized rims with Suntour XC hubs (freewheel rear).
    Are they 130mm like the original? Looks like your Cimarron is an 85, same year as mine. The original wheelset on them was Deore XT deerhead hubs laced to silver araya (7x?) rims.



    I've been thinking about getting a lighter weight wheelset for mine. Nashbar had a good deal on a 26" Vuelta Zerolite 24-spoke wheelset a little bit ago. The rear is spaced to 135 and I'm not sure how much weight they would cut though, someone just posted a build with them in the Vintage MTB thread recently.

    Edit: Ah, my bad, with those Biopace chainrings, XC hubs, hard anodized rims, it sounds like yours is probably an 86 with the 85 forest green frame color?

    http://mombat.org/Schwinn_Specs.htm
    Last edited by mainstreetexile; 01-27-13 at 10:06 PM.

  22. #847
    Chainstay Brake Mafia
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
    The wheels are Weinmann rims with Shimano STX/Parallax hubs. They have 6/7 speed freehub, came with a cassette, that is working just fine. The former wheels were the original anodized rims with Suntour XC hubs (freewheel rear).
    did you notice a big difference in the wheel weight? what tires did you use, and how do you like them? I need to find myself some lightweight slicks but can't decide what to get

    I recently weighed my drop bar conversion on bathroom scale.. with lights it was 30-31lbs. Losing 2lbs would put it right around where yours is. I need a different cassette with more closely spaced gears because right now there is really only one gear I use regularly. I'm tempted to convert it to single speed for maximum weight savings, though a 1x7 with a more suitably geared cassette is also pretty appealing.

    Today I was hanging out with some pedicab drivers after the event we worked and the guys were really interested in Univega drop bar conversion... they liked the under chainstay brake and dark chrome finish the most. People who know bikes are often asking me "what kind of bike is that"
    1986 Diamondback Apex ~ 1988 Diamondback Ascent EX ~ 1989 Jamis Dakar ~ 1989 Specialized Stumpjumper Comp
    1993 Trek 8300 Composite ~ 1993 Diamondback Axis Team Titanium ~ 1995 Diamondback Apex

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  23. #848
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    On the year of my bike, it is a Cimmaron LE, not the Cimmaron model, hence the painted fork. I'll double check the headbadge, its either a 1987 or a 1988.

    On slicks, I usually go with 1.25 inch wide tires. Its as narrow as it gets. I have a set of 1.25 Nashbar slicks (346grams) on my wife's bike, and I have a set of Forte Metro K 1.25 street tires (340grams and they are not slicks) on my Univega.

    Here are the tires (607 grams). I used these as they were the only ones I had. They are not slicks, rather they are road tires. I tend to load up on tires when there is a good sale. I like the Panaracer brand (heck, I like Panasonic bikes too). These were a deal on Nashbar a while back. I see Nashbar has them again for $9.99.

    If I go to the Nashbar slicks, I would shave almost 1 1/2 pounds off the bike, pretty substantial.

    On the wheels, they were just a thrift store find. They were cheap ($4), had STX hubs, 7 speed cassette, and were drilled for presta valves (my preference). The original wheelset on my Cimmaron were drilled for Shraeder valves.

    Based on the tire weights above, I'll probably swap out the Panaracers for the Fortes on the Univega, and get the weight of the Cimmaron down to about 27 to 27.5 pounds. Might do something on pedals later, and that saddle belongs on my Trek 620 touring bike, so I will lighten it up a tad more. 27 pounds is probably it.



    As you can see, I am using all of my gears. Its a combination of motor (lack of) and a serious kickass hill I just climbed getting to this picture location.


    Forte Metro K, on sale, but not a terrific price:
    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...400904__400904


    I use a bicycle scale to weigh bikes, much more accurate than the bathroom scale. I suspend it in a doorway in my workshop. I used to use one of those $5 ebay hanging scales, they work great as well:




    Here's a close up of the weight on the Univega. It has the lighter weight tires, modern wheels (another garage sale find), seven speed cassette, lighter racing saddle, but it does have a rear rack. I think you could shoot for a similar weight out of yours. In 500+ bikes rehabbed and owned, I have never bought a new wheel. And with about 100 extra wheels in inventory right now, I don't see a need for buying new anytime soon!




    Epilogue:

    I got it down to 25.94 pounds, by swapping wheels from the Univega Alpina Pro, and putting on a light weight saddle. I could save another half pound or so by installing light weight pedals. Bike still has much of its original parts: seat post, stem, derailleurs, crankset. A stock Cimmaron starts at 29 pounds (many of those catalog weights are without saddle or pedals).

    Getting it under 25 would take replacement of a lot of parts. There's only so much you can shave off when you start with a relatively heavy frame.
    Last edited by wrk101; 01-28-13 at 11:31 AM.
    See some of my bikes on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/BillsVintageSteelBikes

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  24. #849
    Senior Member cooperryder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobrabyte View Post
    Took my Rockhopper out for a ride today before I set it up for my tour next month. Here's some pics of the current setup:


    And since pictures are fun, here's some pics of the new stuff going on. Starting up the new build this afternoon. Swapping out the WTB dirtdrops for Nitto Noodle bars, adding a rear rack and panniers, a second bottle cage, toe clips & straps, and fenders. I may not install the fenders until the rainy season starts here in the summer. We barely *** a few drops during this time of year. I decided on these Gilles Berthoud stainless steel fenders since both the seatstay and chainstay bridge are threaded for this type of fender intallation:
    I really like the look of your Rockhopper and look forward to pics with the new bars , etc.

  25. #850
    one life on two wheels cobrabyte's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooperryder View Post
    I really like the look of your Rockhopper and look forward to pics with the new bars , etc.
    Thanks! It's coming along nicely.

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