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  1. #1401
    Senior Member Shp4man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ish View Post
    That's actually a really nice frame with rebadged True Temper OX II tubing. The frame is better than the parts hanging off of it.

    Diamondback is one of the most underappreciated old MTB brands.
    Thanks, you're right. It will be my "new" old mountain bike, and it'll be nice to have two wheelsets, one city, one off road. It's actually in fairly good condition with Deore XT components and a nice color, kind of a candy apple red.
    "Life is like a ten speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use." -Charles M. Schulz

  2. #1402
    Senior Member neo_pop_71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aemmer View Post
    Per the discussion above; The idea of the early drop bar Mtb's was to ride in the drops not the hoods. The benefit was a arguably better hand position than flat bars, and the bonus of using the flex in the bars as a form of early suspension (lost if riding on the hoods). Google Jacquie Phelan (her bike Otto) or vintage WTB racers to see some examples of a few early drop bar racers on their steeds. Most of the people here in this thread are putting together drop bar bikes more for cruising around on the road, commuting, or possibly touring. The needs of a Mtb riding tough terrain dictate being close to the brakes (on the drops). I think the idea of finding an old Mtb and bringing it back to life as a tourer etc... is great. Restoring a bike to early drop bar specs is over the top in vintage Mtb. cool.

    Crappy pic but see how when riding in the drops in this WTB cockpit the brakes and shifters are accessible without removing the hand from the bars so control can be maintained in challenging terrain.



    The WTB bars were designed with sweeping drops and very little space on top to ride on top let alone on the hoods :



    Not saying one style is right or wrong but they are way different. Certainly a bike built for touring or commuting will benefit from multiple hand positions but for using on challenging terrain, the drops are where you want to be.
    I gotta tell 'ya T., I'll never get tired of seeing pics of your great dog blazin' along side and I'll certainly never tire from seeing my old Ritchey decked out in vintage WTB components! Seriously now, you've enjoyed it long enough, time to put it on a FedEx truck and return it to my stable!

    Quick component question, are those Campy or Suntour Superbe brake levers? I'm leaning towards Campy (knowing how you build) but Suntour did a nice job copying the Campy levers with their Superbe series. Funny enough, I'm picking up a set of Superbe levers for my '92 MB-1 dirt drop build in the morning after I pick up my Cimarron frame from the powdercoater.

    SuntourSuperbeLevers.jpg

    The price tag on vintage Campy scares me but not as much as the price on vintage WTB, my tight budget only allows for used Superbe.

    -D-
    I'd rather add more life to my years, than years to my life.

  3. #1403
    Senior Member neo_pop_71's Avatar
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    I picked up my '88 Schwinn Cimarron LE from the powder coater this morning, it took a day longer than promised but it was worth the wait! I went with a slighter warmer color than bright white, it seems like every bike these days has bright white somewhere, I wanted a more subtle color scheme (off-white, black, and silver) for my rebuild. I have some NOS Cimarron waterslide decals to apply but I need to buff the finish first, allow the decals to set for 24 hours, and then it's off to my buddy's autobody shop for some clear. I love the fillet brazing and the smooth lines, all the threaded eyelets have been removed as have the threaded rack mounts from the seat stays. I know "the dude" won't approve but who cares, it's my custom build and I dig the look of the frame!

    CimarronPowder1.jpgCimarronPowder2.jpgCimarronPowder3.jpgCimarronNOSdecals.jpg
    I'd rather add more life to my years, than years to my life.

  4. #1404
    one life on two wheels cobrabyte's Avatar
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    Looks like you *may* have a tough time getting the lower headset race installed with the p-coat on there. My guy masks that part off.

  5. #1405
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    Quote Originally Posted by neo_pop_71 View Post
    time to put it on a FedEx truck and return it to my stable!

    Quick component question, are those Campy or Suntour Superbe brake levers? I'm leaning towards Campy (knowing how you build) but Suntour did a nice job copying the Campy levers with their Superbe series. Funny enough, I'm picking up a set of Superbe levers for my '92 MB-1 dirt drop build in the morning after I pick up my Cimarron frame from the powdercoater. -D-
    Sounds like somegreat projects.

    Dwelt on that for a long time. I finally went with Campy with the simple logic it matched the headset and I liked the white hoods.

    Currently putting together a early 80's Ritchey road bike and having a tough time deciding which levers/brakes to go with. Mostly parts out of the grab bin for starters. Keep staring at a set of Shimano 600 Arabesque that will match the deraileurs or a minty fresh set of Superbe brakes and levers. Then a set of aero DiaComps start calling. A bastard build, The cranks and barcons are Campy and the headset is a Stronglight. All era correct but not too caught up in using all one groupset yet unless I love the way it rides.

    As far as sending back that blue bike goes, it may not be my prettiest Ritchey in the garage, but hands down it is my go to favorite one to ride. the Workhorse of the stable.

    Still loving it!
    Seek: Front Derailleur- SIMPLEX SJA 103

  6. #1406
    Senior Member neo_pop_71's Avatar
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    Yeah, I forgot to mask and point that out to them, this was the first time I've used these guys. Thanks cobrabyte for pointing that out, I appreciate the extra set of eyes! This powder coater is less expensive than anyone else ($65.00 to sandblast and powder coat a frame and fork) but I've seen quite a few frames they've done and their work has always been clean. It's no big deal, I can pop in at my LBS and use their tools (as I'm an emergency wrench if they are in a pinch) to surface the fork crown and I want to chase the threads on the B.B. shell and derailleur hanger too. I have a NOS 1" cartridge bearing headset that I'll press in while I'm there, just in case I need to remove more material off the race contact. Thanks again!

    Peace,

    -D-
    I'd rather add more life to my years, than years to my life.

  7. #1407
    rain dog mainstreetexile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aemmer View Post

    Awesome. Can you post some more pictures of this beauty?

    Pretty cool to see the hite-rite on there too, I'm guessing it's just for style/period-correctness and you don't use it much? I have one or two of those sitting around, but they probably need to hit an oxalic acid bath.

  8. #1408
    Senior Member neo_pop_71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aemmer View Post
    As far as sending back that blue bike goes, it may not be my prettiest Ritchey in the garage, but hands down it is my go to favorite one to ride. the Workhorse of the stable.

    Still loving it!

    Damn ! ! !

    When you get a free moment, can you post a photo of the Campy bar end shifters? I'd like to see those, I used to have a set on an Olmo touring bike that I outgrew, the Campy set was much prettier than the Barcons that were on my next touring bike.

    Thanks!
    I'd rather add more life to my years, than years to my life.

  9. #1409
    Senior Member neo_pop_71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainstreetexile View Post
    Awesome. Can you post some more pictures of this beauty?

    Pretty cool to see the hite-rite on there too, I'm guessing it's just for style/period-correctness and you don't use it much?
    Actually, I believe T. (Aemmer) rides this bike all the time, anywhere and everywhere... that's why he won't give it back!!!
    I'd rather add more life to my years, than years to my life.

  10. #1410
    one life on two wheels cobrabyte's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neo_pop_71 View Post
    Yeah, I forgot to mask and point that out to them, this was the first time I've used these guys. Thanks cobrabyte for pointing that out, I appreciate the extra set of eyes! This powder coater is less expensive than anyone else ($65.00 to sandblast and powder coat a frame and fork) but I've seen quite a few frames they've done and their work has always been clean. It's no big deal, I can pop in at my LBS and use their tools (as I'm an emergency wrench if they are in a pinch) to surface the fork crown and I want to chase the threads on the B.B. shell and derailleur hanger too. I have a NOS 1" cartridge bearing headset that I'll press in while I'm there, just in case I need to remove more material off the race contact. Thanks again!

    Peace,

    -D-
    Oh good deal, I wish I had those tools at my disposal

  11. #1411
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neo_pop_71 View Post
    Yeah, I forgot to mask and point that out to them, this was the first time I've used these guys. Thanks cobrabyte for pointing that out, I appreciate the extra set of eyes! This powder coater is less expensive than anyone else ($65.00 to sandblast and powder coat a frame and fork) but I've seen quite a few frames they've done and their work has always been clean. It's no big deal, I can pop in at my LBS and use their tools (as I'm an emergency wrench if they are in a pinch) to surface the fork crown and I want to chase the threads on the B.B. shell and derailleur hanger too. I have a NOS 1" cartridge bearing headset that I'll press in while I'm there, just in case I need to remove more material off the race contact. Thanks again!

    Peace,

    -D-
    Even with that mistake, that's a terrific deal on a nice looking PC job!

  12. #1412
    Chainstay Brake Mafia
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    Quote Originally Posted by neo_pop_71 View Post
    Actually, I believe T. (Aemmer) rides this bike all the time, anywhere and everywhere... that's why he won't give it back!!!
    I think he meant the hite-rite
    1986 Diamondback Apex ~ 1988 Diamondback Ascent EX ~ 1989 Jamis Dakar ~ 1989 Specialized Stumpjumper Comp
    1993 Trek 8300 Composite ~ 1993 Diamondback Axis Team Titanium ~ 1995 Diamondback Apex

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  13. #1413
    I like chrome. Donkey Hodie's Avatar
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    This is hands down one of the most entertaining and informative threads that I've read in a long time. It's because of all the beautiful builds here that I am seriously contemplating doing the drop bar conversion to one of my two vintage mountain bikes. I have a near pristine 1983 grey Specialized Stumpjumper with all original parts except for the seat, and I have a recently acquired 1986 chrome Mongoose ATB. Both would be great candidates for a drop bar conversion, although they are both different sized bikes.

    I'm wondering which one would be better suited for drops considering my unusual body proportions (I'm 6' 1-3/4" with a 33" PBH). It's usually a pain for me to find a good bike that fits me correctly. I'm probably somewhere between a 20" mtn bike and a 22", or between a 21" and 23" mtn bike. My Stumpjumper is 22" with a 32-3/4" stand-over height (leaving me with 1/4" of room between my huevos and the top tube). The Mongoose is probably a 20" mtn bike with a stand-over height of just a hair over 31" (better stand-over clearance for the boys).

    Besides not much stand-over clearance, the Stumpjumper feels like it fits my proportions more naturally (without having much seat post showing or having to hike up the stem). The Mongoose feels good as well, but to set it up for normal road use, I need to have the seat and stem jacked up a little higher but not too much. I'm thinking the Stumjpumper would be the better candidate for the conversion, and the Mongoose would be better off with some marys or bosco bullmoose bars or something along those lines.

    1983 Stumpjumper...


    1986 Mongoose ATB...


    Which one would you convert?

    Any advice, suggestions, or opinions would be welcome and most appreciated.

  14. #1414
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donkey Hodie View Post
    This is hands down one of the most entertaining and informative threads that I've read in a long time. It's because of all the beautiful builds here that I am seriously contemplating doing the drop bar conversion to one of my two vintage mountain bikes. I have a near pristine 1983 grey Specialized Stumpjumper with all original parts except for the seat, and I have a recently acquired 1986 chrome Mongoose ATB. Both would be great candidates for a drop bar conversion, although they are both different sized bikes.

    I'm wondering which one would be better suited for drops considering my unusual body proportions (I'm 6' 1-3/4" with a 33" PBH). It's usually a pain for me to find a good bike that fits me correctly. I'm probably somewhere between a 20" mtn bike and a 22", or between a 21" and 23" mtn bike. My Stumpjumper is 22" with a 32-3/4" stand-over height (leaving me with 1/4" of room between my huevos and the top tube). The Mongoose is probably a 20" mtn bike with a stand-over height of just a hair over 31" (better stand-over clearance for the boys).

    Besides not much stand-over clearance, the Stumpjumper feels like it fits my proportions more naturally (without having much seat post showing or having to hike up the stem). The Mongoose feels good as well, but to set it up for normal road use, I need to have the seat and stem jacked up a little higher but not too much. I'm thinking the Stumjpumper would be the better candidate for the conversion, and the Mongoose would be better off with some marys or bosco bullmoose bars or something along those lines.

    1983 Stumpjumper...


    1986 Mongoose ATB...


    Which one would you convert?

    Any advice, suggestions, or opinions would be welcome and most appreciated.
    Do the Stumpjumper first please.

    I have a 1983 as well and I want to see yours first.

    Might build one of these for grins.....

  15. #1415
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    An old stumpjumper with campy 8 sounds fun. I know you have a "toothbrush clean" kit floating around.

    edit: keep in mind how simple this would be btw. Campy 8 shares cog spacing with shimano 7 freewheels and the front ergo lever handles mtb triple setups without breaking a sweat.
    Last edited by thirdgenbird; 03-30-13 at 05:30 PM.

  16. #1416
    Jack of all trades anixi's Avatar
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    +1 on the Stumpy, although the 'goose is a close 2nd.
    Put me back on my bike! -- Tom Simpson

  17. #1417
    Rides Majestic
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    J, Nice Stumpjumper! I would do the stumpy 1st. That stem from the mongoose might work great on there (if you're gonna change it anyway). Save all the original parts just in case you need to sell it down the road. P.S.- went to Hampshire bike today and scored some bars, levers, and shifters for a conversion.

  18. #1418
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    Ha, I like sharing pictures. Be careful what you ask for. About the HiteRite, Correct I can honestly say I have never actually used it during a ride. It does fit right in with the 1987 build on this bike. I ride this bike more often than any of my other vintage rides. Basicaly a white label (1987/88) 6 speed Shimano XT groupset with a WTB dirt drop cockpit.


    A bit of a Ritchey fetish, I contacted D about getting this bike from him several years ago. After some easy negotiating we came to an agreement that would leave everyone happy. I was really drawn to this particular bike because along with being my size, someone had ordered it with roller cam mounts for the front that just look so cool. something TR only did by special order.

    Say stop:


    A vision:


    Probably started it's life out at PT. Reyes. A place you could go find a Cunningham, Ritchey, Ibis or several other sweet Mtb's to buy or just rent and ride for the day:



    I already had built a different dirt drop Ritchey before this and rode it into the ground. That one was a mix of modern and old, this time I was determined to keep things within the spirit of the era. Took a few years to gather all the correct parts. The LD stem and the WTB shift Pods being the hardest to come by. I think the only thing on the bike not correct to 87 would be those 737's. I rode in the clips for years but now I feel naked if I am not clipped in:



    Pictures from a few outings:

    Not much of the bike but one of my favorites:



    Initial ride, Catching up with my wife who was out picking blackberries along one of my local trails:



    Well suited for the open trails of California. Road trip 2011:



    Closer to home with my riding partner:



    Falling down drunk:



    Local ride:



    Although I have ridden the bike in places like the big loop at Tiger, the Church propert out in Black Diamond, it really excell's on the more open terrain found in places like E. Wa. or the logging roads closer to home. I ride it quite often off of 410 when free of snow. Looping Sun Top with Skookum being my favorite. There is a time and a place for the supermondo deluxe full suspension rides and I still have a Turner for that, but more often than not, I now enjoy the simple ride a fully rigid bike offers.
    Seek: Front Derailleur- SIMPLEX SJA 103

  19. #1419
    80's bikes FTW
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    how are you attaching those thumbies to your bars? Loving those drop bars....do tell I think my Univega is screaming out for that setup your rockin.
    1988 Schwinn Prologue ,1985 Benotto Modelo 850 SS/Fixed , 1994 Univega Alpina 5.5 , 2011 Diamondback Response, 1997 Giant ATX 970, 1995 Specialized FSR , 2007 Litespeed Niota AL

  20. #1420
    Senior Member neo_pop_71's Avatar
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    Hey Donkey Hodie, lucky man to have a couple good bikes worthy of doing a drop bar conversion! A few have weighed in and I agree that your Stumpjumper would be the best choice. You stated the best reason, the Stumpy feels more natural. Beyond that your Stumpjumper has a taller headtube which from a frame standpoint is better suited for a drop bar conversion since the size of the frame will put those bars higher and get your bars more inline with the saddle height. Given the components on your Stumpy, you can run your thumb shifters (preserve your shift cables and all the housings, it looks like they'll be plenty long enough for the conversion) on the bar tops for now, no need to buy bar end shifters until you decide if a drop bar builds suits you. You'll need a dirt drop bar, there are plenty to choose these days, I tried a few and found the On One Midge bar to be the best on my MB-1. I bought a Nitto MT-10 "Dirt Drop" quill stem for my Cimarron conversion, it's the stem of choice for these builds if you want to long stem to help nail down your running height. The last thing you'll need to buy is a set of drop bar brake levers, you can fly the cables or go aero, it's an aesthetic call. Everything else on your Stumpy is ready to roll as is and I think it's the best frame for trying out a new drop bar build.

    Not a hard conversion for your Stumpjumper...
    1. "Dirt Drop" handlebar
    2. Tall quill stem
    3. Drop bar brake levers
    4. New pair of road brake cables
    5. Bar tape

    Have fun and good luck!

    -D-

    MB-1DirtDrop3.jpgMB-1DirtDrop4.jpg

    p.s. I've included a pic of the bar set up on my MB-1, I love the action and feel on my Suntour XC Pro thumb shifters, I've never felt a need to switch to bar end shifters because after a little trial and error the stock thumb shifters have done the job nicely... plus no chance of knee shifting! I should mention that I spend a majority of my time riding in the drops. The Midge bar has nice shallow drops that run nicely parallel to the top tube, I just prefer mine ticked up a bit.
    I'd rather add more life to my years, than years to my life.

  21. #1421
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    Quote Originally Posted by thirdgenbird View Post
    An old stumpjumper with campy 8 sounds fun. I know you have a "toothbrush clean" kit floating around.

    edit: keep in mind how simple this would be btw. Campy 8 shares cog spacing with shimano 7 freewheels and the front ergo lever handles mtb triple setups without breaking a sweat.
    Hmmmm. Campy, that sounds tasty.

    Actually, I have a full xt gruppo with xtr hubbed x519s sitting at the cabin.

    No need to hurry, I'll just continue watching these cool builds for now.

  22. #1422
    The Rabbi seely's Avatar
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    Took the Schwinn down to the co-op today and cleaned her up for spring. I realized you guys are right, the bar angle was ridiculous so I rotated it down a bit and it does feel better. I think I mistakenly set it up with the drops pointing at the rear brake instead of flat after unpacking it from a trip, and never corrected it.

    Last edited by seely; 03-30-13 at 08:21 PM. Reason: img code
    commuter turned bike mechanic turned commuter (also a Velocity USA employee, but this is my personal account)

  23. #1423
    )) <> (( illwafer's Avatar
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    regarding the 83 stumpy above:

    i have an 83 sport model, and the spacing is 120 in the back. I spread it to 135(!), but I had to use a 7-speed cassette with a space on the OUTSIDE in order to get the wheel to slide in. there's no way you could run 8+ speed if you are using a 135mm wheelset.

  24. #1424
    The Rabbi seely's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by illwafer View Post
    regarding the 83 stumpy above:

    i have an 83 sport model, and the spacing is 120 in the back. I spread it to 135(!), but I had to use a 7-speed cassette with a space on the OUTSIDE in order to get the wheel to slide in. there's no way you could run 8+ speed if you are using a 135mm wheelset.
    Whoa, 120, really? Road bikes at that time were even 126...
    commuter turned bike mechanic turned commuter (also a Velocity USA employee, but this is my personal account)

  25. #1425
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    Quote Originally Posted by illwafer View Post
    regarding the 83 stumpy above:

    i have an 83 sport model, and the spacing is 120 in the back. I spread it to 135(!), but I had to use a 7-speed cassette with a space on the OUTSIDE in order to get the wheel to slide in. there's no way you could run 8+ speed if you are using a 135mm wheelset.
    My suggestion is to run 8spd campy levers with a 7spd shimano FW. Cog spacing is 5mm on both. It will work perfect.

    Quote Originally Posted by gomango View Post
    Hmmmm. Campy, that sounds tasty.


    Actually, I have a full xt gruppo with xtr hubbed x519s sitting at the cabin.


    No need to hurry, I'll just continue watching these cool builds for now.
    Thats the idea Grady. Xtr hubs, xt brakes, crankset, FD, 7spd FW, campy 8 RD and ergos

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