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Old 07-17-12, 10:06 AM   #1
tsappenfield 
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Off to Tuscany for a "proper" paint restoration?

I've been thinking about a new paint job for my 1983 Colnago Nuovo Mexico (Saronni Red). I've done some research and this seems like a very difficult color to duplicate. From what I've read, the base coat of silver and then several layers of a red tinted clearcoat are applied over the silver. If you have ever seen this paint job, it is stunning. I never understood "depth of color" until I layed eyes of my bike. I read an interesting story from PezCycling News about the restoration of a Colnago Mexico. Do I have to take my frame to the guys at Color Sistem in Tuscany, Italy to get this repainted as it appeared originally or can you recommend someone in the good old USA?
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Old 07-17-12, 10:45 AM   #2
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I see a few of Chris Kvale's refinished bicycles often in our riding group.

One of those is a very nice green late 70's Colnago Super.

In addition, I own three of his bicycles/framesets and the finish on each is perfect.

Yes, I really mean perfect.

If I wanted a "hard to match" color, that's where I would start on an expensive bicycle.

...and I do believe you get what you pay for when it comes to painters.

That's not always the most expensive in each case, as I judge the experience of the painter first.

He is located here in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Here's a link:

http://www.chriskvalecycles.com/CKC/..._Painting.html

Good luck.
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Old 07-17-12, 11:43 AM   #3
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Giovanni Pelizzoli does restoration on more then just Ciocc and his own frames also and from the last couple of members who sent their frames back they were pretty darn reasonable in price.
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Old 07-17-12, 12:06 PM   #4
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That color can be done in two ways...

1st way to do the color is to go to a car paint jobber that has a computer color scan machine thing (color spectrum analyser), the guy will scan the color and then the machine will match and mix all the tints you need for it, no idea if can be done in a full base color (if the red is a candy) but i have seen similar color so it might be possible (i think)

2nd way, as you said, use a grey, silver base color and shoot the candy (this is how is called) color over the top, the painter has to experiment to know exactly how many coats he has to put over it. Doubt is more than 3.

I would try to find a shop with a color spectrum analyser 1st. If you have one you are almost set.
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Old 07-18-12, 09:43 AM   #5
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About those color spectrum analyzers. Here in Ohio, people from auto paint stores keep telling me that unless they can have a flat surface (not too many of those on a bicycle), the analyzer cannot make a read. I've gone to a three different companies and they all have the same story, so I pretty much gave up on that pathway.

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Old 07-19-12, 08:57 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by tsappenfield View Post
About those color spectrum analyzers. Here in Ohio, people from auto paint stores keep telling me that unless they can have a flat surface (not too many of those on a bicycle), the analyzer cannot make a read.
I suspect the only light hitting the machine's sensor should be reflected from the surface you're testing. If you have the dimensions of the color sensor, I suspect you could make a little collar that would match the curve of the tubing on one end and the dimension of the color sensor on the other. Maybe need to be painted (flat?) black in the inside?

Just a thought...
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Old 07-19-12, 09:42 AM   #7
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Sounds like something to do in the winter...
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Old 07-19-12, 01:47 PM   #8
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I've used the top of a fork blade for the analyzer. YMMV.

If you have wide flattened chainstays this might be another area to use.
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Old 07-19-12, 02:07 PM   #9
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I've used the top of a fork blade for the analyzer. YMMV.
My mileage would be short. My Medici (which I am considering repainting) has a chrome fork...

Once nice thing about various American bikes of that period is that it appears many (most?) used stock colors from the Imron chart. Trek certainly appears to have used Imron. I also stumbled upon this Brian Baylis interview, though it appear that at the start he wasn't all that satisfied with the choices available in '74.

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