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Old 01-05-13, 10:44 AM   #1
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Paul de Vivie

Wow, what an amazing read. I googled Saint Etienne, the one time bicycle capitol of France and stumbled upon Paul de Vive. Also known as Velocio. I just kept on reading and reading.
Google him.
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Old 01-05-13, 01:35 PM   #2
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Thank you for the tip! Very interesting man to say the least.
I do not understand his 7th rule: "do not ride for vainglory" or as restated by Clifford Graves "don't ride for the sake of riding".
If I followed this rule as I understand it, I would not ride at all unless I was going on an errand.
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Old 01-05-13, 01:55 PM   #3
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Here is the 1965 article from 'Bicycling' magazine by Clifford Graves that (it would appear) introduced 'Velocio' to a new generation of cyclists, in America.

It's a wonderful article, and a great bit of history. Thanks, Big Chainring!

http://cycling.ahands.org/bicycling/velocio.html
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Old 01-05-13, 02:54 PM   #4
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Definitely one of those people I wish I could meet. Thanks for posting the article!
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Old 01-05-13, 03:14 PM   #5
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Great find, I am going to enjoy reading some of that stuff. Lay off the meat, you C&V lunch lovers!

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Originally Posted by David Newton View Post
Thank you for the tip! Very interesting man to say the least.
I do not understand his 7th rule: "do not ride for vainglory" or as restated by Clifford Graves "don't ride for the sake of riding".
If I followed this rule as I understand it, I would not ride at all unless I was going on an errand.

In french it says Ne jamais pédaler par amour-propre: don't ride out of self-love, vanity, or just to show off
(only rule I break from time to time). C. Graves' translation is a bit off, I suppose he meant, not for the sake of riding, but to improve oneself.
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Old 01-05-13, 03:41 PM   #6
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"don't ride out of self-love, vanity, or just to show off"

I think that says it very succinctly.
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Old 01-05-13, 06:12 PM   #7
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I think that one is often misunderstood. As I interpret it, it means: don't ride because you feel you have to ride--ride because you want to ride.

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Originally Posted by David Newton View Post
Thank you for the tip! Very interesting man to say the least.
I do not understand his 7th rule: "do not ride for vainglory" or as restated by Clifford Graves "don't ride for the sake of riding".
If I followed this rule as I understand it, I would not ride at all unless I was going on an errand.
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Old 01-05-13, 07:10 PM   #8
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I like what I have read about the man in various books regarding gearing. I really wish I understood more French.
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Old 01-05-13, 07:24 PM   #9
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Thanks! I knew something wasn't getting interpreted fully.
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Old 08-02-14, 12:48 PM   #10
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Paul de Vivie's drive system.
Out of curiousity, anyone have an explanation how this Velocio works? Combination of moving the BB spindle and use fingers for the rear? Do they mean mechanical fingers and not using ones hand?
I found a few images and followed to some French translation.

OK so after small reading book of Raymond Henri (of the Velocipede in the modern Derailleur), I arrive at
the conclusion that it is on a mixed system:
Left pedal is a triple a chain known as the floating system tray: no tensioner, down reports by dropping
the chain with his heel, and you go back with 2 fingers. The rear sprocket is fixed. To avoid derailments,
Velocio had tinkered with the "finger of steel", which is a small metal washer that keeps the chain near
the sprocket to avoid derailment. I think that it is the system that we can see underneath the paw - photos
on my book to be a little different. System in vogue in the 1930s, and allowing up to 6 speeds on a
fixed/fixed hub.
Right pedal: polychaine with clutch in the bottom bracket. Basically the axis had voluntarily of the game,
and 2 Cranksets were equipped with notches in such way that we can, by pushing the axis at right or left,
choose to operate a pedal or the other. With an intermediate position that allowed to freewheel on
descents, since the fixed gear on the back did not allow it. Given the lines of channels that the system
should produce, ca should not be very quiet. And weight quickly to discourage the cyclists at the time.
Continuing playback of the chapter in question, it speaks of another system invented by Velocio with a
polychaine: tray/pinion fixed left, right on freewheel (type trial) and disengageable, fixed right
sprocket. You quietly pedals in small ratio, and to mount speed, you operable with the tip of your foot a
small pin set on/in the right crank (!) coming to engage in the great plateau right (!) and hop you mounted
speed. In is stopping pedaling, ergot (using a probably spring) is emerging from the shelf, and you feints
at low speed.

Attached Images
File Type: jpg Velocio paul-de-vivie.jpg (82.4 KB, 13 views)
File Type: jpg velocio1.jpg (48.9 KB, 11 views)
File Type: jpg velocio2.jpg (70.8 KB, 11 views)
File Type: jpg velocio3.jpg (75.3 KB, 11 views)
File Type: jpg velocio4.jpg (70.7 KB, 13 views)
File Type: jpg velocio5.jpg (100.1 KB, 11 views)
File Type: jpg velocio6.jpg (103.0 KB, 10 views)
File Type: jpg velocio7.jpg (23.9 KB, 10 views)
File Type: jpg velocio8.jpg (31.9 KB, 12 views)
File Type: jpg velocio9.jpg (74.4 KB, 10 views)

Last edited by crank_addict; 08-02-14 at 12:59 PM.
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Old 08-02-14, 03:09 PM   #11
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Thank you for an enlightening and most interesting thread. It's amazing what one can learn at BF.
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