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Old 01-16-13, 09:47 PM   #1
spacemanz
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Super Iris?

I'm talking about old rims with "perforated" braking surfaces, from the early 70s or maybe even earlier. These came off an Atala, and had some inner tubes that were thicker than most tires, LOL, and say Schwinn puncture resistant, and had Wolber tires, that are cracking from age (BTW, these are 27" x 1 1/4") . But the wheels had Maillard Normandy high flange hubs, in good condition once cleaned & repacked, and the rear has a Regina freewheel, that's heavy but worth saving. But anyways, what's the story on this type of rim? I understand the perforations are supposed to help braking, but what about the quality? Are they all cheap junk, or are some actually pretty decent? Once I got all that rubber off, & made allowances for that heavy Regina, the wheel doesn't seem "too" heavy. (?) So educate me, if you know, please? Thanks.
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Old 01-17-13, 05:07 AM   #2
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In my experience, the patterned braking surface on the steel rim does increase stopping power, but at the expense of a horrible buzz noise every time the brakes are applied. A decent set of alloy rims will equal that braking power and eliminate the brake buzz. Additionally, the alloy rims will reduce rolling weight and improve ride quality feel.
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Old 01-17-13, 05:20 AM   #3
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So what you're saying is, don't waste too much time trying to shine them up? I knew they were outdated, & a little heavy, but I wasn't 100% sure yet, if they were steel or alloy. They're actually pretty light-ish, for being steel, and still straight, after all these years, so I might still play around a little, just for fun.
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Old 01-17-13, 05:26 AM   #4
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BTW, if nothing else, they DO have a pretty cool name, Super Iris. Maybe they'll make me faster than a speeding locomotive, or bullet, or something. I meant to say thanks too, so thanks.
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