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-   -   storing multiple frames in a *tiny* space, calling ideas (http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/916174-storing-multiple-frames-tiny-space-calling-ideas.html)

orangeology 10-03-13 10:10 AM

storing multiple frames in a *tiny* space, calling ideas
 
after deciding just to go with the bug, urges, impromptus and whatever you call,
realizing i've already gotten more numbers of frames and some old steel junks than i've realized.
and i am not willing to stop, these frames go hell with me. :)
while i am sure this is not an uncommon symptom in the sector in this hospital:

calling out some nice, neat ideas to store/organized multiple frames and forks.
i know some of you folks have nice basement, garage or extra shop room etc.
but this is for a tiny second bed room—that became a hazard metal junk facility—in a condo apt in the city.

share your genius solutions, please.

*specifically looking for some nice rack-ish sort for the frames.
don't wanna drill up the drywall with bunch of homedepot brackets.

RobbieTunes 10-03-13 10:13 AM

space is space. ceiling space is the best if you still want to use the floor and some of the walls. cheap hooks are available.

thinktubes 10-03-13 11:12 AM

Cover 'em with pipe insulation foam and stack 'em up like cord wood.

jimmuller 10-03-13 11:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RobbieTunes (Post 16128266)
space is space.

Also the final frontier.

...to boldly ride where no bike has gone before. [cue music]

RaleighSport 10-03-13 11:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RobbieTunes (Post 16128266)
space is space. ceiling space is the best if you still want to use the floor and some of the walls. cheap hooks are available.

This if you want fast cheap and easy.

cyclotoine 10-03-13 11:44 AM

If you are able to utilize the whole room and have an empty well I would make a frame out of 2x4 that runs up the walls with the top 2x4 oriented so that the narrow edge is touching the ceiling. Screw vinyl coated hooks into that. You will have to use your imagination a bit to build the frame, but it shouldn't be too difficult. I had a friend who managed to hang four bikes in a space as narrow as 4 or 5 feet in a bachelor pad with similar wooden structure. The less frequently used bikes can have the pedals removed and of course you'l have to hang them opposites so they tuck nice and tight. If you have 10 feet of space you should be able to hang 8 bikes no problem.

RaleighSport 10-03-13 11:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cyclotoine (Post 16128660)
If you are able to utilize the whole room and have an empty well I would make a frame out of 2x4 that runs up the walls with the top 2x4 oriented so that the narrow edge is touching the ceiling. Screw vinyl coated hooks into that. You will have to use your imagination a bit to build the frame, but it shouldn't be too difficult. I had a friend who managed to hang four bikes in a space as narrow as 4 or 5 feet in a bachelor pad with similar wooden structure. The less frequently used bikes can have the pedals removed and of course you'l have to hang them opposites so they tuck nice and tight. If you have 10 feet of space you should be able to hang 8 bikes no problem.

There's also the cheap metal conduit with elbows, heavy duty pvc piping etc etc...

orangeology 10-03-13 12:12 PM

thanks for responses and ideas. good ideas indeed, i'm sure it's proven.

yup. i've thought/seen the ceiling hooks, frame across the ceiling with hooks etc.
that will however turn this room into a too much looking like a shop/garage as well.
which i wouldn't mind but, the room is occasionally used as guest bedroom for family/friend visit etc.

guess i am seeking more like a neat furniture or decorative solution still hitting 2 birds with its efficiency.
started to sketch some things out already, just wanted to see what's out there.

will share if i find/come up nice one. pls, keep 'em coming as well if you guys have any.
thanks alot for quick and nice inputs.

wrk101 10-03-13 12:34 PM

1. Hang vertically.

2. Remove pedals and rotate bars to be parallel with top tube. This reduces the space between bikes dramatically.

I made a portable rack, narrower than a door opening, so I could move it room to room. It could be made attractive by using a nicer grade of wood and staining it, or painting it. My goal was to have something that did not require any permanent attachment to ceiling or wall. I have a picture of it somewhere...

Harbor Freight makes a somewhat decent A Frame wheeled bike stand that holds up to six bikes (sort of). Runs about $50, catch it on sale and it can be quite a bit less. Note, I do not see it in their catalog anymore.

I've also used chrome store racks (from a clothing store), both the four arm and two arm models, to hold both framesets and tires.

As you can imagine, I have bikes everywhere right now.

Getting them stored VERTICALLY is the key to minimizing foot print.

wrk101 10-03-13 12:54 PM

Here's a pic of one rack. My goal was not aesthetics, so I used whatever lumber I had handy, and this one is spaced for bikes with pedals and bars in a normal orientation. As you can see, I sized this one to fit in a slot between the fireplace and side wall.

Area is much more cluttered right now, due to the enormous collection of wheels, framesets, and complete bikes.

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5139/5...4752f439_b.jpg






tb

bikemore 10-03-13 12:56 PM

My second bedroom is a bit larger then a full size bed. Something like 5 or 6 ft by 9 - 10 ft. Right now I have 3 frames stacked under a table and one in the closet. I put cardboard between the frames. If I didn't have the tool boxes under the frames I probably could get 5 stacked. 2x4s use way too much space. Also I have a good size pile of pipe insulation and tie wraps. Forks are wrapped and labeled in and in another closet. Parts go up to the ceiling.

I can provide a picture of the stack of frames if that helps.

bikemore 10-03-13 12:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wrk101 (Post 16128895)
Here's a pic of one rack. My goal was not aesthetics, so I used whatever lumber I had handy, and this one is spaced for bikes with pedals and bars in a normal orientation. As you can see, I sized this one to fit in a slot between the fireplace and side wall.


tb

But this is a house, not a small city condo, right?

RaleighSport 10-03-13 01:07 PM

Don't even ask how many hobbies I have, but this is back from when space was very limited and I was sorting crap in my "office" http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...0503121310.jpg
http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...0503121313.jpg
http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...0503121314.jpg
http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x...503121314a.jpg
Once I was done, everything was still in that same room but I had most of the floor space back.

Velognome 10-03-13 01:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RaleighSport (Post 16128565)
This if you want fast cheap and easy.


Really?

wrk101 10-03-13 01:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bikemore (Post 16128905)
But this is a house, not a small city condo, right?

no, it's one side of a dumpy duplex.

Italuminium 10-03-13 02:00 PM

what works for me is hang them by little string loops on nails, like roof tiles. I got 4 frames, 3 complete bikes, 8 wheelsets and several boxes of compenents in little under 4 m3 :)

RaleighSport 10-03-13 02:24 PM

Really but I am definitely open minded to any suggestions you have

wrk101 10-03-13 02:47 PM

One change/improvement I would make in the one I posted above is to go up vertically higher, above the bikes. The lower section of the rack would be as posted, but extending upward would be several shelves. I could store quite a few parts or whatever above the bikes. And if this unit were designed for just framesets, I would lower everything down, put the framesets much closer together, and have even more shelves above it. Conserving floor space is key to the plan.

dddd 10-04-13 01:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Italuminium (Post 16129122)
what works for me is hang them by little string loops on nails, like roof tiles. I got 4 frames, 3 complete bikes, 8 wheelsets and several boxes of compenents in little under 4 m3 :)


You said "roof tiles", but sounds a lot like my "fish scales" layup of wheels along the wall.

I found some very compact-but-strong ceiling hooks at Tru-Value that can be forced onto 3/4" iron pipe with a 1.1" OD.
Each hook I tested to 300lb (two guys) and spaced them to every other floor joist (every 32") above the ceiling drywall.

Then I had a 17-foot pipe cut to length, and voila, 22 bikes along the 17-foot wall with easy ingress/egress when it's time to grab one or put one away.
Note in this room the ceiling's height is a little under 7', so there's just a foot of space above the floor to store anything under the bikes.
The bikes protrude only 42 inches (3-1/2 feet) from the wall.

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5466/1...84231e60_z.jpg


The hooks were a very important part of this concept of bike storage.
After some experiments, each hook was custom-bent from 68-cent, foot-long steel rod, 3/16" in diameter, and can hold a 50lb mtb.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7167/6...f02f33db_z.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7026/6...1e106462_z.jpg

oddjob2 10-04-13 02:14 AM

Having seen the nice new building you live in from the outside, I think you must resort to an offsite storage solution. Otherwise, I would suggest acquring some bike frame boxes, which are smaller than full bike boxes, and just stashing them in a closet or under the bed.

Maybe a bellman's cart which has the clothing rod on top? Also, the apparel carts you see pushed around midtown in NYC in the garment district. Then you roll em out of the way when guests come. Or this.

http://www.containerstore.com/shop/s...000997&N=13379

If you want to display the frames:

Threaded Iron pipe, mounted wall to wall with escutcheon plates. Use shower rod plastic covering to give them a chrome or white look.

Bar foot railing or retail slatwall with hooks from ouwaterplastics.com off I-80 in Bogata Bergen County.

http://outwater.com

Metro wire rack shelving wall mounted high. Hang frames from shelving.

http://www.containerstore.com/shop/s...ial/components

By the way, tell your neighbor Ely the QB, to get his sh|t together.

Tyler Durden 10-04-13 02:45 AM

I like your set-up dddd!

dddd 10-04-13 04:29 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Tyler Durden (Post 16130723)
I like your set-up dddd!

Thanks, Tyler.

When I was still living in my apartment, I devised the first version which was self-supporting on the floor using 2X6 wooden A-frames and a thicker, 1.3" OD iron pipe.
The whole thing barely cleared an 8-foot ceiling.
I was able to hang 14 heavy bikes along the 10-foot length of pipe:

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7168/6...645dfc58_z.jpg


I recently moved into a house with unused basement space, so decided to use the longer wall for storage, attached directly to the floor joists above.
I like the way that it came out, visually speaking. It's very compact and makes storing the road bikes quite easy, no having to swing the handlebars away from straight ahead and no need to remove a wheel.

The crawl space didn't escape similar modifications, I used the limited height for wheel and frame storage along an even longer retaining wall, with a few more frames and even bikes hanging opposite. I first lined the sloping dirt floor with portland cement wash from a garden watering can, the final coat shown still drying:

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7414/1...62dd5b15_z.jpg


I even managed to squeeze a corner workbench and shelf in (cut from the same piece of 4'X8', 1-1/8" plywood), down at the other end:

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7406/1...bac85ee6_z.jpg

orangeology 10-04-13 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oddjob2 (Post 16130714)
Having seen the nice new building...
(...) By the way, tell your neighbor Ely the QB, to get his sh|t together.

some really good idea initiatives here. thanks, David!
oh and i will tell him. i am sure he's hanging out with the girls in the biergarten around the corner. :)

Cache 10-05-13 11:53 AM

For really small space storage...

#t=44

Bruce Enns 10-05-13 12:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cache (Post 16135058)
For really small space storage...

#t=44

Don't worry, that will polish right out!


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