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Old 10-04-13, 02:22 PM   #1
treal512
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Punctured tire and new brakes? - Few Q's

1) So I snagged a good sized piece of glass earlier this week on my rear wheel before I bombed down a pretty large hill in San Marcos. Thank God I noticed the PSI drop before I descended. In my almost 3 years of commuting every day now, I've only managed to get 2 flats. This puncture, however, is on a fairly new Continental GP4000S tire and it's a good sized gash (I think?). The reason I'm posting about it on here is because I don't have enough experience with these things to know if it's safe to keep using the tire or what. So here are a few pictures of the damage. I could use some advice. Thanks!


Glass still in

Glass removed

Okay, so maybe it's not as big as I thought. I still feel better asking you guys though. What do you think? I ride the bike every day and occasionally ride a 20-40 miler on the weekend with friends.




2) My most recent purchase, early this summer, was an 89 Miele Azsora. It is my first experience with a real road bicycle and my first experience with older vintage style lugged tubing. So far, it has been above and beyond my expectations. It has easily displaced my other 2 bikes in the stable and will unlikely change for the foreseeable future until I get another vintage roadie. However, the one mechanical thing I'd really like to do on the bicycle is upgrade the brakes. After coming from a mountain bike with discs and recently trying my friend's center pull cantilever brakes, I really feel the need to upgrade my brakes sometime in the near future. The stopping power is just laughable and really does not inspire any sort of confidence. Even my single speed with relatively cheap side-pull brakes has more stopping power. Anyways, here are some pictures of my current brake setup. I know very little about what my options are and if I can find used brakes that would be an upgrade without breaking the bank. Thanks again for looking!


Front

Front

Rear

Rear
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Old 10-04-13, 02:28 PM   #2
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1. Run it.
2. Any contemporary short-reach caliper set will do. I'd recommend Shimano 105 or better if stopping power is important to you, which it sounds like it is.
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Old 10-04-13, 02:42 PM   #3
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1. Run it.
2. Any contemporary short-reach caliper set will do. I'd recommend Shimano 105 or better if stopping power is important to you, which it sounds like it is.
Run it? That's what I'm thinking too.

Lots of hills out here around San Marcos, so yep, braking power is important to me. What are all the main differences between the Shimano 105 brakes? I wouldn't mind keeping my bike more classic looking, but braking power will trump that when it comes down to it. Thanks for your input.
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Old 10-04-13, 02:48 PM   #4
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Somewhere around that time (1989) the Shimano 105 calipers received the benefits of design innovation before even the higher end groups. So I've read. And that looks like what you have shown. In any case,
the latter iterations of all the Shimano single pivot calipers are pretty good stoppers when well set up. Must have lively rubber in pads. Inspect, clean, lubricate, set them up properly and run 'em.

Double pivot calipers came soon after those you show. A step up in stopping. If money is a concern go with the economic RSX double caliper. Not as nicely finished as higher models but still cute as a button and improvement over the single pivot, no doubt.

As for the damaged tire it probably will be fine. I would go with a thin, permanently affixed boot to close off the hole from the inside. You may feel a little thump on rotation but no big thing, probably.

Best,

J
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Old 10-04-13, 05:15 PM   #5
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Quote:
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Must have lively rubber in pads.
+1 I'd start with this, maybe your old calipers are ok and your problem is just lousy shoes.

Quote:
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I would go with a thin, permanently affixed boot to close off the hole from the inside. You may feel a little thump on rotation but no big thing, probably.
+1 I've done this several times, and don't even notice the thump until I hit 25mph or so, and only then on smooth pavement.
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Old 10-04-13, 05:53 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afilado View Post
Somewhere around that time the Shimano 105 calipers received the benefits of design innovation before even the higher end groups. So I've read. And that looks like what you have shown. In any case,
the latter iterations of all the Shimano single pivot calipers are pretty good stoppers when well set up. Must have lively rubber in pads. Inspect, clean, lubricate, set them up properly and run 'em.

Double pivot calipers came soon after those you show. A step up in stopping. If money is a concern go with the economic RSX double caliper. Not as nicely finished as higher models but still cute as a button and improvement over the single pivot, no doubt.

As for the damaged tire it probably will be fine. I would go with a thin, permanently affixed boot to close off the hole from the inside. You may feel a little thump on rotation but no big thing, probably.

Best,

J
I don't even have a clue what the condition of my pads are. I guess I'll start there. Any suggestions on brake shoes? I don't really know where to start looking. My first search pulled up Kool Stop Salmons and Swisstop Green. Are they any good still? Also, how do I know which brake pads to order? There seems to be a million different kinds!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckk View Post
This brake is "open" it might work better if you readjusted the cable clamp and made it look like the front.
Any dual pivot brake, even a lowly Tectro will work much better. Or you might just need new brake shoes on what you have.
The brake surface of the rim looks awful, get some scotchbrite and solvent at it.

If the tire cut wants to pucker after you fill up the tube you might want to use another patch "boot" on the inside of the tire.
Well, it looks like I know what I'm doing with my Saturday now

I'll adjust the lever, but you're right, the rim surface has been something I've noticed every now and again, but have done nothing about. I'm gonna look into it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lascauxcaveman View Post
+1 I'd start with this, maybe your old calipers are ok and your problem is just lousy shoes.


+1 I've done this several times, and don't even notice the thump until I hit 25mph or so, and only then on smooth pavement.
This is all great advice. Exactly what I was looking for (since I don't know what to look for, yet). Thank you guys so much so far!

Last edited by treal512; 10-04-13 at 08:52 PM.
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Old 10-04-13, 06:20 PM   #7
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Even taking a bit of sand paper or emory board to the braking surface of the pad will get the old, crusty rubber off and down to fresher rubber, that may even help a good bit short of new pads.
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Old 10-04-13, 06:33 PM   #8
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Kool stop and Swisstop are first rate. There are lots of others not as pricey.

Be sure to get a configuration which will closely approximate those to be replaced if going with just pads swap out. If going for full block replacement
be aware of size/clearance limitations with forks and stays.

On the backside of the calipers you'll find a Shimano part number. Use that as a reference for researching pads/blocks.

A couple of examples of replacement candidates.....

http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...15&category=36

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-BR-570.../dp/B004JKJKWG

Do a little logical Google and Bike Forums research. Lots of useful discussion is available. Also, there's advice from strangers and then there's a knowing/certainty based on your own work and experience. Each rings a different tone.

J
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Old 10-04-13, 08:35 PM   #9
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Good cables and fresh lined housings also help (along with new brake pads). Those calipers could use a really good cleaning and lubricate pivot points. Rear brake is in release mode.

I do like the dual pivot style that came out shortly after these, and on most of my keepers, that's what I go with. Many brands and models out there, they can be picked up used at a reasonable cost. Tektro, Shimano, CODA (Cannondale branded), etc., to name just a few. There was a guy on ebay clearing out left over NOS CODA sets cheap, but I haven't seen him post in a while. You just need to get the right REACH to fit your bike/wheel geometry. Google reach before buying any new calipers.
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Old 10-04-13, 09:32 PM   #10
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Google reach before buying any new calipers.
Yeah, I found that out.
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Old 10-05-13, 12:12 AM   #11
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I had no idea there were SLR single-pivot brakes -- always figured that SLR and dual-pivots came at the same time and were inseparable. I learn something new here everyday.
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Old 10-05-13, 03:04 AM   #12
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those rims look awful. i'd use some 3m auto quality sandpaper (from an auto parts store) on 'em in 1000-1500 grade under a dripping faucet.

don't use those same pads after doing so. your work will be erased. replace 'em with kool stop salmons and use new cables/housing.

a perfectly true front wheel helps immensely.

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Old 10-05-13, 03:28 AM   #13
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The pads you have aren't ideal. Ideally you want a pad & holder setup so that you can adjust them to hit the surface of the rim squarely. They'll wear better & grab well, right out of the gate. I've modded all of my vintage brakes this way. It's also much easier to find & change pads.
The tire, you never know how long it will last. It's just the nature of tire wear. That slice could hold for a couple years or get worse. My suggestions...put a tube patch under the hole. Reason being, if the hole opens up, the tube could push into the hole & rupture. Also, keep an eye on it. Tires are the only thing keeping you upright.
On an end note, Enjoy the steel ride! It's incomparable!

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Old 10-07-13, 03:27 PM   #14
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You guys are awesome!

I'm ready to take this whole brake system job on for myself now that I feel like I know what my weaknesses are. And yes, the rims do look awful. When I first got the bike, they were perfectly fine. Guess this stuff just happens when the bike is actually ridden (or when you don't know how to maintain brakes, lol).

So here is my current game plan:

1) Take Scotch-Brite and a solvent (not sure what yet??) to my rims and smooth them out. Use light sanding afterwards if still needed.
2) Replace the brake pads and pad holder with something like Kool Stop on my front and rear brakes.
3) If braking power is unsatisfactory, I will replace the brake cables.
4) If braking power is still unsatisfactory, I will consider replacing the brakes all together with either something vintage or something like Tektro dual pivot side pulls.

What do you guys think? Any suggestions or tips on my order/equipment I intend to use? By the way, upon inspection, it looks like the glass never made it completely through the tire. I am a little puzzled as to how the puncture even happened now. Have any of you ever seen glass embedded in the tire that made the inner tube go flat, but didn't see the actual glass protrude through the tire on the inside?
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Old 10-07-13, 05:38 PM   #15
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On the tire, I'd sacrifice a decent dollar bill, folded over one time, about 1" x 1" and I'd super-glue it inside the tire. Then I'd run those skins until they wore out.

On the brakes, I'd keep my eyes peeled for some dual pivots with decent pads. Before you resort to Scotch-Brite on the rims, try some 0000 steel wool and WD40, or some Goo Gone to get the rubber dissolved and gone. Sure, you get your hands dirty. No biggie.

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