Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-06-13, 12:51 PM   #26
wahoonc
Senior Member
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
Posts: 16,763
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
I usually use Turtle Wax Chrome Polish on my chrome stuff and it works pretty good, a thin layer of car wax certainly won't hurt it.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-13, 02:21 PM   #27
randyjawa 
Senior Member
 
randyjawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada - burrrrr!
Bikes: 1982 Tomassini, 1963 Peugeot PX10, and eight special issue Canadian lightweights...
Posts: 7,451
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 106 Post(s)
Quote:
Does chrome "go bad?"

Seems to me, chrome only gets hozzled up when it's scratched or when it's REALLY let go.

Am I wrong in that observation?
Chrome will, absolutely, go bad! Have you ever seen chrome blush? Though the surface is not marred in any way, the shine is changed due to discoloration under the chrome plating, sometimes starting out as a blotchy beneath the surface appearance. Once this happens, there is nothing that I know of that can be done to rectify the situation, short of rechroming. Sadly, the chrome had blushed on this old Proctor. Unfortunately, the cosmetic concern does not come through well in the photos but in person, the blush was very obvious on this old Proctor-Townsend.

The storage area should be dry and, preferably, out of the sun light, which can cause issues with art, paint and, yes, even the chrome, not to mention melting hoods, tires and anything else of the rubber/plastic family. Avoid large temperature swings, such as those that we can, and do, experience in Canada, sometimes on a daily basis. I ramble - sorry.

Use a pertroleum based product on the chrome plated and coat all bare metal, be it frame, fork or component based. (Do not get a petroleum based product on anything rubber.) Often times, the frame chrome plating will be far better quality that some of the component chrome plating. And don't forget that alloy oxidizes also, but instead of red iron oxide forming, dirty whitish silver aluminum oxide does, and that will, sooner or lated, pit the soft alloy. Put another way, these things need to be protected also. Next, spring and memory...

Derailleurs should be shifted and stored, to place the least pressure on the springs. This means, for most bikes, the chain rests on the small cog and small ring.

Drop tire pressure to just enough to maintain the tire's shape. Hang the bike from both, or just one wheel, but be careful here. Wrap the hook(s) with inner tubing, ensuring that the metal of the hook, even if plastic coated, will have no chance of coming into contact with the metal of the wheel rim. Without that cushion, damage to the rim, particularly alloy ones, will occur over time, even if the bike remains untouched. The Earth's natural vibrations, over time, can actually wear a dip into the soft aluminum of the rim.

Finally, have a look, every now and then, just to ensure that you did the above right. If you are like me, you will look every day, filled with anticipation for the next riding season.
__________________
Learn how to find, restore and maintain vintage road bicycles at... MY "TEN SPEEDS"
randyjawa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-13, 04:37 PM   #28
2manybikes
Dog is my co-pilot
 
2manybikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes: 2 many
Posts: 15,763
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by randyjawa View Post
Chrome will, absolutely, go bad! Have you ever seen chrome blush? Though the surface is not marred in any way, the shine is changed due to discoloration under the chrome plating, sometimes starting out as a blotchy beneath the surface appearance. Once this happens, there is nothing that I know of that can be done to rectify the situation, short of rechroming. Sadly, the chrome had blushed on this old Proctor. Unfortunately, the cosmetic concern does not come through well in the photos but in person, the blush was very obvious on this old Proctor-Townsend.

The storage area should be dry and, preferably, out of the sun light, which can cause issues with art, paint and, yes, even the chrome, not to mention melting hoods, tires and anything else of the rubber/plastic family. Avoid large temperature swings, such as those that we can, and do, experience in Canada, sometimes on a daily basis. I ramble - sorry.

Use a pertroleum based product on the chrome plated and coat all bare metal, be it frame, fork or component based. (Do not get a petroleum based product on anything rubber.) Often times, the frame chrome plating will be far better quality that some of the component chrome plating. And don't forget that alloy oxidizes also, but instead of red iron oxide forming, dirty whitish silver aluminum oxide does, and that will, sooner or lated, pit the soft alloy. Put another way, these things need to be protected also. Next, spring and memory...

Derailleurs should be shifted and stored, to place the least pressure on the springs. This means, for most bikes, the chain rests on the small cog and small ring.

Drop tire pressure to just enough to maintain the tire's shape. Hang the bike from both, or just one wheel, but be careful here. Wrap the hook(s) with inner tubing, ensuring that the metal of the hook, even if plastic coated, will have no chance of coming into contact with the metal of the wheel rim. Without that cushion, damage to the rim, particularly alloy ones, will occur over time, even if the bike remains untouched. The Earth's natural vibrations, over time, can actually wear a dip into the soft aluminum of the rim.

Finally, have a look, every now and then, just to ensure that you did the above right. If you are like me, you will look every day, filled with anticipation for the next riding season.
What is your fee to do all my bikes?
2manybikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-13, 07:12 AM   #29
Grand Bois
Senior Member
 
Grand Bois's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pinole, CA, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 16,822
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 131 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by randyjawa View Post
Derailleurs should be shifted and stored, to place the least pressure on the springs. This means, for most bikes, the chain rests on the small cog and small ring.
I think this is probably not beneficial, but it won't hurt anything.
Grand Bois is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:39 AM.