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  1. #1
    Senior Member canuckbiker's Avatar
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    type of steel

    I have an old Nishiki road frame from the early 80's (I sure am getting alot of old bike stuff, I should probobly start setting limits ). I know absolutly nothing about this frame, not even the model name. but it does have a decal that says "Nishiki High Carbon Tubing". I'm not familier with all the terminology for steel quality, so is "high carbon" tubing high tensile or cheap chromoly? I was under the impression high tensile steel was low carbon.

  2. #2
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
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    Does it have a number? Run-of-the-mill high-tensile steel is 1020 (=0.20% carbon). I got an 83 Nishiki sport and it had a sticker saying "Nishiki Chromoly main tubes 4030".
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  3. #3
    Klaatu barada nikto cascade168's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moxfyre
    Does it have a number? Run-of-the-mill high-tensile steel is 1020 (=0.20% carbon). I got an 83 Nishiki sport and it had a sticker saying "Nishiki Chromoly main tubes 4030".
    I have an '83 Nishiki Century with "Nishiki 1027 Tensile Steel". It's pretty heavy, but probably the most reliable bike I have ever owned. Very easy to work on and with the exception of brake and shift cables, and ball bearings, it's all original.

    I don't know squat about frame materials, so I'd be happy to see someone post and comment on these various steel types.
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  4. #4
    Chronic Tai Shan ofofhy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuckbiker
    I have an old Nishiki road frame from the early 80's (I sure am getting alot of old bike stuff, I should probobly start setting limits ). I know absolutly nothing about this frame, not even the model name. but it does have a decal that says "Nishiki High Carbon Tubing". I'm not familier with all the terminology for steel quality, so is "high carbon" tubing high tensile or cheap chromoly? I was under the impression high tensile steel was low carbon.
    Post over in Classic/Vintage as there are a few Nishiki devotees there.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member canuckbiker's Avatar
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    It doesn't have a number. It weighs about the same, or maybe a little less than my Norco hi ten frame. All I got was the frame, fork, crankset (Sugino), brakes(Dia Compe side pulls), and front der.(Suntour Spirt). I'm sure it had stem shifters, or maybe bar-ends because it had a clamp on cable stop on the downtube (which I removed because I prefer dt shifters). The frame and fork are dark blue, if that may help with recognition.

  6. #6
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuckbiker
    It doesn't have a number. It weighs about the same, or maybe a little less than my Norco hi ten frame. All I got was the frame, fork, crankset (Sugino), brakes(Dia Compe side pulls), and front der.(Suntour Spirt). I'm sure it had stem shifters, or maybe bar-ends because it had a clamp on cable stop on the downtube (which I removed because I prefer dt shifters). The frame and fork are dark blue, if that may help with recognition.
    Uh... are the cranks riveted together, or can the chainrings be removed? If it's the latter, I'd bet it's cromo, if the former, I'd bet it's cheap hi-ten steel. Just based on the fact that better components usually go with a better quality frame.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member canuckbiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moxfyre
    Uh... are the cranks riveted together, or can the chainrings be removed? If it's the latter, I'd bet it's cromo, if the former, I'd bet it's cheap hi-ten steel. Just based on the fact that better components usually go with a better quality frame.
    Cranks are riveted, so it's probobly hi ten.

  8. #8
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuckbiker
    Cranks are riveted, so it's probobly hi ten.
    That'd be my best guess. But don't worry about it too much, a hi-ten road bike can be a great ride. I have an '83 Lotus bike, which fits me perfectly, is neither too stiff or too soft, and generally a pleasure to ride.
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  9. #9
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    From an engineering viewpoint, your typical, low carbon, 1020 steel found on most entry level bicycle frames is considered "soft" and has a tensile strength of around 56,000 psi. "High carbon" steels typically have tensile strengths around 100,000 psi and is generally used for tooling

    Of course, without knowing the actual composition of the Nishiki tubing it's hard to say exactly what it is. Presumibly it falls somewhere between the two examples. Having higher carbon, it should be stronger than your typical 1020.

    I have a fairly extensive set of specs for Nishiki models. If you post or send me the components list, I may be able to identify the model.

  10. #10
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    You can probably build it into an enjoyable commuting or transportation bike, but I would strongly advise against investing much money into the project. Hold out for a double-butted CrMo frame of the same vintage.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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  11. #11
    Senior Member canuckbiker's Avatar
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    I don't have the entire bike, but I do have the frame/fork, crank, front der, brakes, stem, handelbar, and brake levers. The crank is a 52/40 with rivited chainrings from Sugino; the front der is Suntour Spirt (with "high normal" spring position, which I've never seen until now); the brakes are Dia Compe side pull; The stem is AL and the h bar is steel; and the brake levers are Dia compe non-aero with "saftey" levers. I'm pretty sure it had stem shifters or possibly bar ends because it had a clamp-on cable stop on the downtube (which I removed because I prefer downtube shifters). The colour of the frame and fork is dark blue. Don't know if this is enough info for identification, but its worth a shot.

  12. #12
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuckbiker
    I don't have the entire bike, but I do have the frame/fork, crank, front der, brakes, stem, handelbar, and brake levers. The crank is a 52/40 with rivited chainrings from Sugino; the front der is Suntour Spirt (with "high normal" spring position, which I've never seen until now); the brakes are Dia Compe side pull; The stem is AL and the h bar is steel; and the brake levers are Dia compe non-aero with "saftey" levers. I'm pretty sure it had stem shifters or possibly bar ends because it had a clamp-on cable stop on the downtube (which I removed because I prefer downtube shifters). The colour of the frame and fork is dark blue. Don't know if this is enough info for identification, but its worth a shot.
    Enough to know it's pretty low end and not worth dumping much if any money into.

  13. #13
    Seņor Member USAZorro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sydney
    Enough to know it's pretty low end and not worth dumping much if any money into.
    I think that's the consensus, but it sounds like all that's needed is a wheelset and he'll have a decent daily rider. Too bad he isn't my neighbor. I'd be able to give him what he needs to get it running.
    The search for inner peace continues...

  14. #14
    Senior Member canuckbiker's Avatar
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    I have most of the parts I need to get it running, and I'm trying to decide if I want to build it pretty much like it was, or turn it into a fixed gear. I've never ridden a fixie, so I'm tempted to try it.

  15. #15
    Seņor Member USAZorro's Avatar
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    If its pretty flat there, it could be worth trying. I'd rather ride a girl's bike than a fixie around my neighborhood.
    The search for inner peace continues...

  16. #16
    Senior Member canuckbiker's Avatar
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    The prairie region of Canada=hills? what are these things you call hills? (actually there are a few decent sized hills in Saskatchewan, just none where I live).

  17. #17
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Until about 1973, all of the SunTour front derailleurs were normal-high, such that both levers forward = high gear and both levers back = low gear. They actually worked quite well with an 8-tooth or smaller chainring drop. For really fast upshifts, SunTour made the SL version, with a heavy-duty spring.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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  18. #18
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by USAZorro
    ... I'd rather ride a girl's bike than a fixie around my neighborhood.
    ... or a mixte, anyway

    Yes, USAZorro, you are definitely a kindred spirit. I love gears, the more the better, but I'm just a hill-climbin' fool.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
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    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  19. #19
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    Canuckbiker, the most likely candidate for your bicycle is a Nishiki Rally, circa 1982. It could be older, but it's unlikely to be newer, unless the derailleur was replaced.

    By the way, I've been through your neck of the woods! My mother's family is scattered throughout the Swift Current/Leader/Maple Creek triangle. There's even talk of making the trip out there this summer, for a family re-union.

  20. #20
    brain damaged bovine muccapazza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuckbiker
    I have most of the parts I need to get it running, and I'm trying to decide if I want to build it pretty much like it was, or turn it into a fixed gear. I've never ridden a fixie, so I'm tempted to try it.
    Fix it, canuckbiker! Once you've ridden a fixie, you will laugh at all the donkey bottom biters with their silly so-called derailleurs!

  21. #21
    Senior Member canuckbiker's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info everyone, I've got the frame built up with some spare componants I had lying around, and it rides pretty nice. The size is perfect, and it's not overly heavy (maybe 26 or 27 pounds, which I don't think is too bad, considering my first road bike was a 40 pound Schwinn Continental). I think I may run it with derailleurs for a while, and then when I have enough money for a track sprocket (college student=0$), I will try Sheldon Brown's fixie conversion.

  22. #22
    Seņor Member USAZorro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John E
    Yes, USAZorro, you are definitely a kindred spirit. I love gears, the more the better, but I'm just a hill-climbin' fool.
    I think that mounting a ten speed rear cluster on that 14 speed hub and throwing a triple on the front would be the ultimate. Who could beat a 420 speed bike?
    The search for inner peace continues...

  23. #23
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by USAZorro
    I think that mounting a ten speed rear cluster on that 14 speed hub and throwing a triple on the front would be the ultimate. Who could beat a 420 speed bike?
    ... and to think, that as a middle school twerp in the early 1960s, I was impressed by Charlie Harding's 90-speed bike: 3 chainrings * 5-speed S-A hub * 6-speed cogset. I did once build a 36-speed bike: 3-speed wide-range S-A hub * 14-16-18-20 cogset * 45-49-53 chainring.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
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    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  24. #24
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    Questions raised about the Nishiki bike's CONDUCT.

  25. #25
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    I just bought Nishiki sport with the same decal. Its also got a really great looking set of old suntour components. It is in such great condition and I got a crazy good deal on it. I was trying to find out what year it was made in. U say 83, cool!

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