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  1. #1
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    Mid to late 80's Nishiki info, if you please!

    This weekend I bought a used Nishiki Cresta and I just have some questions about it. First, is about how old is it? I think it's from about 1985 to about 1988. The rest of my questions have to do with it's reputation, if indeed it has one at all. I really don't know anything about it. I believe that Nishiki can be a decent brand, but... well... help me out here! Does anybody know anything about Nishiki frames from this time period, and whether or not they are at all decent? I can say this, I really do LIKE my used Nishiki, I just want to know something about it is all.

  2. #2
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    Nishiki was a Jpanese brand manaufactured by Kawamura. They they produced a wide variety of bicycles and have a good reputation.

    The Cresta was a mid range touring model from the mid-1980s. Frame construction varied, depending on the year, as did the components. Some years used a CrMo main frame with a hi-tensile steel rear triangle. Others years, it was Tange #2 CrMo throughout.

    One year did use the SunTour MounTech derailleurs, which can be problematic. The second parellelogram actuates via the jockey pulley which has a poor reputation for wear and is not east to rebuild/replace. This was no fault on Nishiki, as the design looked good and worked well initially, with the problem developing over the long haul.

    Another year used the SunTour Lepree which is readily distinguishable by the triple pulleys on the rear derailleur.

    In general, Nishiki provided good value for the money. Workmanship was sound and functional. Component selection was generally good, with everything functioning well together. If the bike was not abused, you should have a good machine on yuor hands.

  3. #3
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    I rode a 1971 Nishiki with double-butted Ishiwata CrMo tubing for 20 years. Your frame is vastly superior. T-Mar's bottom line assessment is spot-on.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  4. #4
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John E
    I rode a 1971 Nishiki with double-butted Ishiwata CrMo tubing for 20 years. Your frame is vastly superior.
    I'm having trouble getting that one to compute if his frame could be one built with cromo/hi-ten.

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    In response from another thread about this, I took a look at some things on the bike...

    Is the frame lugged? Yes. The lugs are cut in a sort of design, too, so I guess it looks kinda cool. Anyways, yes

    Sticker on frame tube indicating frame material? Chrome Molyboen Steel, or CrMo I suppose...

    Crowned fork or unicrown fork? Not sure what this means, but the top of the fork, where the bars that are holding the wheel come together to one bar that goes through the front of the bike and attach to the handlebars at the very top..At the top of the fork where it comes together there are lugs what hold the two bars holding the wheel and the one bar that holds the handlebar. Did that make sense? I hope it did.

    Metal head badge or sticker? Sticker, but it still looks cool at the head because of the baroque cutting on the lugs making a sort of design there.

    Components. I suspect they are original, as there is a lot of wear on them. Suntour Cyclone M-II.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Iride's Avatar
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    as far as what year it may be, like tmar has said umph-million times, check www.vintagetrek.com for component dating. Easiest to see on your nishiki would be the inside (opposite pedal) of the cranks. or back side of brake calipers.

  7. #7
    I couldn't car less. jeff williams's Avatar
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    "Crowned fork or unicrown fork? Not sure what this means, but the top of the fork, where the bars that are holding the wheel come together to one bar that goes through the front of the bike and attach to the handlebars at the very top..At the top of the fork where it comes together there are lugs what hold the two bars holding the wheel and the one bar that holds the handlebar. Did that make sense? I hope it did."

    Photo's #1 =Unicrown, #2 =Bi-plane crown, #3 =single crown.

  8. #8
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    Well then, I've got a single crown fork! Thanks!!!

  9. #9
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sydney
    I'm having trouble getting that one to compute if his frame could be one built with cromo/hi-ten.
    If he has a butted CrMo main triangle, it matters little whether the stays and forks are high tensile steel or CrMo. In the very early 1970s, Japanese CrMo frames had a spongy, leaden feel which did not live up to the promise of the frame material. I have owned both the very early American Eagle SemiPro / Nishiki Competition and two lowly Peugeot UO-8s of the same vintage, and I actually prefer the UO-8 frame.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  10. #10
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    Those are some fine looking fork crowns. TR should go back to that stuff.

  11. #11
    I couldn't car less. jeff williams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by damosk
    Those are some fine looking fork crowns. TR should go back to that stuff.
    The double crown was on MB2 or 1 Bridgestones. I run a unicrown TR Logic Tange fork. Nice.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Mhendricks's Avatar
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    I'm going to take a look at this Nishiki sometime tomorrow. Any comments? Price seems a little high for this model.

    http://www.craigslist.org/sby/bik/66254856.html

  13. #13
    Now with racer-boy font! Moonshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mhendricks
    I'm going to take a look at this Nishiki sometime tomorrow. Any comments? Price seems a little high for this model.

    http://www.craigslist.org/sby/bik/66254856.html
    I once had a 1983 Olympic Royale, which could be close in relation to this model. The Olympic Royale had cro mo tubing throughout (not just the main triangle) and new cost around $230. Mostly SunTour components.

    The price ($135) sounds a little high to me. I expect my Olympic Royale today would fetch $50 - $75 in good condition.

  14. #14
    Dolce far niente bigbossman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mhendricks
    I'm going to take a look at this Nishiki sometime tomorrow. Any comments? Price seems a little high for this model.

    http://www.craigslist.org/sby/bik/66254856.html
    It may be overpriced for the SF Bay Area, but not by much. If it were mine and it has decent components and is in good cosmetic and mechanical shape, I'd post it for (and probably get) $120 for it.

    The guy's ad reads real funny, though - he describes those stupid safety levers as "touring brakes". That makes me suspicious. I'm not too familiar with the Nishiki hierarchy, so if it has stuff like steel wheels/stem/bars, I'd pass on it. Look it over really critically, and if it's nice and you like it offer him $100.00. I'll bet he takes it.

    John D.

  15. #15
    juneeaa memba!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff williams
    "Crowned fork or unicrown fork? Not sure what this means, but the top of the fork, where the bars that are holding the wheel come together to one bar that goes through the front of the bike and attach to the handlebars at the very top..At the top of the fork where it comes together there are lugs what hold the two bars holding the wheel and the one bar that holds the handlebar. Did that make sense? I hope it did."

    Photo's #1 =Unicrown, #2 =Bi-plane crown, #3 =single crown.

    Is that Ritchey yours? It's beautiful!

  16. #16
    I couldn't car less. jeff williams's Avatar
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    No, mines an ugly racer.
    http://www.oldmountainbikes.com/bikes/ Photo's of T.R. frameworks.
    http://www.oldmountainbikes.com/cgi-....cgi?bike=7P39 My fave.

    Mines no-frill racing. The beauty is in the way the frame feels.
    Tom seemed to focus more on the frames ability than cosmetic aethetics in the 90's.
    Fine with me. Mines a prototype P-Project 23 series. 91-93 NORBA wins.

    Thanks for asking.

  17. #17
    Glutton for Punishment
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    The guy's ad reads real funny, though

    He's obviously not very knowledgeable about bikes in general; saying a 23" frame is for taller riders -- he's probably never seen a 62cm frame. He probably just came into possesion of it somehow, and isn't an owner who actually used it.

    Nice looking bike though. Like everyone's observed though, somewhat overpriced.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mswantak
    He's obviously not very knowledgeable about bikes in general; saying a 23" frame is for taller riders -- he's probably never seen a 62cm frame. He probably just came into possesion of it somehow, and isn't an owner who actually used it.
    I don't think he's very far off the mark. A 23"/58.4cm frame would normally be a good fit for a well-proportioned, 6 foot male. Of course, it's the top tube length that's really important.

  19. #19
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    Prolly just my bias then. I'm only 5'9" but most of it's legs; I ride 62cm bikes comfortably. Beyond that though, you have to admit the eBay seller does sound a little green.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Mhendricks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigbossman
    It may be overpriced for the SF Bay Area, but not by much. If it were mine and it has decent components and is in good cosmetic and mechanical shape, I'd post it for (and probably get) $120 for it.

    The guy's ad reads real funny, though - he describes those stupid safety levers as "touring brakes". That makes me suspicious. I'm not too familiar with the Nishiki hierarchy, so if it has stuff like steel wheels/stem/bars, I'd pass on it. Look it over really critically, and if it's nice and you like it offer him $100.00. I'll bet he takes it.

    John D.
    John,
    Went and looked at the bike today and like you mentioned, checked it out and the rims were steel. Passed on it right away. My search continues.........

  21. #21
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    The Suntour Cyclone components were some of the best made and were superior to shifting and durablity of either the Campy or Shimano! The Suntour Mountech series was Suntour MTB line of derailleur which could have been used on your bike because of its ability to accept a wide range of gears and was the worlds first derailleur designed specifically for off road use (gee another first for Suntour along with the invention of the slant parallelogram rear derailleur design that all other companies eventually copied). The Mountech shifted just as good as their other derailleurs (which was superior to any body's elses) but that particular model had a problem with the pulley that would supposely wear out after a year. But I'm not convinced the Mountech had severe problems; I ride on Suntour Superbe Tech derailleurs that supposely had the same issues as the Mountech and they have over 140,000 miles with no issues...that's more then a years worth of riding!! But the Superbe shifts very fast and smooth, something my old Campy Nouvo Record or my newer Shimano XTR cannot do. The Suntour Cyclone is every much as good mechanically as the Superbe just not as light (but close) and not as polished.

    Does the bike have barend shifters and cantilever brakes? It was a decent touring bike in it's day and probably cost around $550 new...close to the price of a new Trek 520 touring bike cost today taking inflation into consideration.

  22. #22
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    [QUOTE=froze] The Suntour Cyclone is every much as good mechanically as the Superbe just not as light (but close) and not as polished. [QUOTE]

    Actually, the Cyclone was lighest derailleur in the SunTour line-up. The Superbe and Superbe Pro were designed as competition derailleurs and were substantially heavier than the Cyclone, supposedly for increased reliability.

    The concern with the Superbe and Superbe Pro, for most riders, are their limited capacity and maximum cog size. Most riders prefer wider range gearing, which the Cyclone can handle in it's medium and long cage versions.

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