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Old 03-12-05, 02:31 PM   #1
RK1963
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1987 Peugeot: what about the fork and stays???

I have a Peugeot Triathlon, circa 1987, w/shimano 105 components. A decal on the frame indicates that the 3 main tubes are made of Reynolds 501. Just wondering: does anyone know what the fork and stays might be made of?

With thanks,

RK
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Old 03-12-05, 07:42 PM   #2
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If the decal indicates Reynolds 501 for the three main tubes, the forks and stays are likely hi-tensile steel.
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Old 03-13-05, 04:31 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Mar
If the decal indicates Reynolds 501 for the three main tubes, the forks and stays are likely hi-tensile steel.
T-Mar,

Do you have the original specs of the 1987 Triathlon Bike? Mine is (too) white and has this Reynolds 501 sticker on the fork. Found more pictures of Triathlons with chrome forks on the internet, but do not know whether these are modded of standard versions.

Maarten
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Old 03-13-05, 02:50 PM   #4
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My "501" sticker has "Reynolds 531" written on the bottom. Could that mean that the balance of the bike (other than the main tubes) is 531? Also, "simplex" is written on the derailler hanger.
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Old 03-13-05, 04:03 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RK1963
My "501" sticker has "Reynolds 531" written on the bottom. Could that mean that the balance of the bike (other than the main tubes) is 531? Also, "simplex" is written on the derailler hanger.
There were two common Reynolds 501 frame decals (and their French equivalents)

1. "Guaranteed built with Reynolds 501 Chromalloy M fork blades, stays and butted frame tubes". This means all the tubing in the bicycle is Reynolds 501, though only the top. down and seat tubes (and steering column) are butted. The remaining tubes are plain or taper gauge. Lugs, dropouts and fittings would be from various suppliers.

2. "Guaranteed built with Reynolds 501 Chromalloy M butted frame tubes." This means the top, down and seat tubes are Reynolds 501 butted tubing and the head tube is Reynolds 501 plain gauge. The stays and forks may not be Reynolds. Lugs, dropouts and fittings would be from various suppliers.


Normally Reynolds sold the tubing in sets. The framebuilder could buy a complete set or a main triangle set and reynolds supplied the appropriate decal. If a manufacturer bought the complete set, then from a marketing point of view, it would make sense to apply decal #1. Applying decal #2 might discourage a knowledgeable customer, who is looking for a full Reynolds frame.

Main triangle sets allowed the framebuilder to provide a slightly cheaper and more competitive product by using alternate materials for the stays and/or forks. The frame is still attractive to the novice buyer who recognizes Reynolds as a good tubeset, but does not appreciate the fine print, nor understand that the bicycle may be only partially Reynolds. This was a very common practice.

Usually, when building frames with mixed tubesets, framebuilders would utilize the better tubing in the main triangle and use lesser grades for the stays and/or forks. In the late 1980s, 501 was Reynolds base tubest. There was no lower grade. So by applying decal #2, it implies non-Reynolds stays and forks. However, the forks can be covered indendently, by using a separate Reynolds 501 foerk decal, which implies that only the stays are hi-tensie steel.

Now, Peugeot was a very big and long time customer of Reynolds, so there is the possibility that they could order custom sets, and that Reynolds would produce a special decal, just for them. However, higher grade stays mated to a lesser grade main triangle would have been non-conventional. Normally it wass the other way around. To get a better idea, you will have to provide the exact wording from the decal.

Please note that modern trends are somewhat different than in the past. It is quite common to use different stay and fork material than the main frame. However, this trend usually involves mating of entirely different materials, with metal main triangle usually being mated to carbon fibre forks and stays. The purpose of the carbon fibre is provide a more comfortable ride by damping out vibration, which is a serious problem with the modern, super stiff, oversize, main triangles.

Pending further information, I would say that the main triangle iof your Peugeot is Reynolds 501 and that the stays are hi-tensile. The fork may be Reynolds 501, but there should be decal, if it is.

Simplex manufactured your dropout. It was typical for most manufacturers to purchase the dropout from the derailleur manufacturer, to ensure optimum compatibility and performance.
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Old 03-13-05, 04:16 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by platenspeler
T-Mar,

Do you have the original specs of the 1987 Triathlon Bike? Mine is (too) white and has this Reynolds 501 sticker on the fork. Found more pictures of Triathlons with chrome forks on the internet, but do not know whether these are modded of standard versions.

Maarten
The 1986 Peugeot Triathlon definitely had chrome plating on the forks, but it used Vitus tubing. Following this trend to 1987 would make sense. Add in the fact that your fork crown bears the Peugeot lion and is made from the same material as the frame and it would be highly unlikely that your fork is not original. If I have the 1987 specs, I wasn't able to quickly put my hands on them.

My comment on the hi-tensile stays and forks was made solely on the basis of the description of the frame tubing decal. I was not aware that the there was a fork decal. However, it is still likely that the stays are hi-tensile. Please refer to my previous response to RK1963, for my rationale.
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Old 03-13-05, 07:12 PM   #7
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Thanks, T Mar, you're the man!

RK
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Old 03-13-05, 07:22 PM   #8
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Does anyone know how much the 1987 Peugeot Triathlon cost when it was new?
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Old 03-13-05, 09:27 PM   #9
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I had one of those recently. It has the setscrew seatpost, right? 26.8, I think? Anyway, mine was definitely not like the one pictured. It had a chrome fork, but without the Lion. The fork blades and stays were NOT 501, only the main tubes. The non-501 forks on mine had a very noticeable seam on the back.
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Old 03-14-05, 04:04 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by RK1963
Thanks, T Mar, you're the man!

RK
Absolutely

Maarten
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Old 03-14-05, 06:32 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RK1963
Does anyone know how much the 1987 Peugeot Triathlon cost when it was new?

1986 was $499.95 US and 1988 was $539.95 US. That should provide a ballpark figure for 1987.
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Old 01-03-08, 11:51 PM   #12
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Along these lines, I have what apparently from above discussion is a 1986 Peugeot Triathlon with the Vitus tubing clearly marked. I am not a true collector of bikes and now that the rear wheel is not "true" (it's not an 8 yet but it is way out of true) I have been told it may be un-repairable and that a replacement wheel would be costly and hard to find.
I wonder if I should sell it or look for a wheel. It has nice paint condition.
Thanks for any input.
Sweeps
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Old 01-04-08, 07:11 AM   #13
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It should be easy to fix the wheel. Its all relative to whether or not you want it too look identicle.

'87 used an anodized Wolber rim while '86 used a 'Velotec anodized by Mavic'.

'86 used a Helicomatic hub which is almosat impossible to get parts for while the '87 used a Shimano cassette hub.

Is your bike one solid color or is it two-tone?

I think there's some serious dating issues with the above bikes....
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