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Old 03-15-14, 12:56 PM   #1
scale
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repainting around a cable eyelet...touch up or ignore?

I just spent the better part of today removing rust around my 2 top tube cable eyelets on a newly acquired frame. All the rust is gone. I can see the brazing and the bare metal. I have the area taped off and now im wondering what to do. Im thinking of either

1. using a good rust preventing primer and a q-tip and then trying to magically try and paint match the area using my eyes and a bunch of enamal model paint
or
2. cover both eyelets with a clear nail polish
or
3. use a good enamel clear coat over both

The bike is an old mid 80s bianchi celeste so color matching is going to be tough. From what i have read, the new stuff you can get is more blue than the older stuff.

All i know is right now it is ugly....not as ugly as rust...but still pretty ugly....

Thoughts?
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Old 03-15-14, 01:08 PM   #2
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1. Sounds more fun and time consuming, so go for it.

I've done it before with pretty good results on a really dark blue Peugeot; probably an easier color to match. For the record, the combo was plain gloss black nail polish with dark navy metallic nail polish, mixed 1:4

If I was going to do Celeste, I'd try starting with either navy or royal blue, with a touch of white and touch of green, and take it from there. It's fun solving those kinds of puzzles I think. Do it under good lighting.
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Old 03-15-14, 01:28 PM   #3
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Is this the stuff you say is more blue than the old stuff?

LINK: Paint - Celeste

I'd start with this Bianchi touch-up paint before trying to match it on my own, but I'm not great at matching colors.

I would not apply paint with a q-tip. If the touch up area is not very large, you can apply it with the end of a toothpick. Apply a small drop and even it out with the tip of the toothpick. This helps to keep the touch up paint only in the repair area and not overlapping the original paint. If it's a larger repair area-say the size of a quarter?---I'd use a fine hobby paint brush and sand carefully with fine wet sandpaper in between coats.
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Old 03-15-14, 01:49 PM   #4
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I'm wondering if it would also be good to apply some rust neutralizing treatment to the exposed metal and brazing before covering it up with touch up pain or nail polish. Just to keep the rust from coming back at the same areas....
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Old 03-15-14, 02:59 PM   #5
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the bianchi celeste on the site looks close but ive read reports that it isnt 100% Either way...i would start here if it was 4.95 shipped but they want 10 bucks to ship that thing. That makes it $15 for that tiny little thing. No thanks.
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Old 03-15-14, 03:01 PM   #6
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I would definitely do that, Chombi.

Hit the hobby shop. It may cost you as much as that little bottle from Bianchi, but you may get by with 3 bottles of model paint.
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Old 03-15-14, 03:37 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chombi View Post
I'm wondering if it would also be good to apply some rust neutralizing treatment to the exposed metal and brazing before covering it up with touch up pain or nail polish. Just to keep the rust from coming back at the same areas....
+10 Hit it with some rust converter primer before painting. Even though all the visible rust may be gone, there will be some left. Rust on cable guides is typical.
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Old 03-15-14, 04:40 PM   #8
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+10 Hit it with some rust converter primer before painting. Even though all the visible rust may be gone, there will be some left. Rust on cable guides is typical.
Agreee. I made this mistake when I restored my LeMond, and two years later, the front cable guide is again peeling paint & showing rust.

Beyond that, I'd recommend both getting the Bianchi touch-up paint AND hitting the hobby shop: buy a few hobby paints (specifically blue, yellow, black, & white) and use them to tint the Bianchi paint (in v. small batches, about the size of a pop bottle cap); paint several swatches, one of each tint variation, on index cards until you get just the right color balance, and make sure you write it all down so you don't forget how much of what color you used on a given swatch.

First though, find out what kind of paint you're dealing with: if the Bianchi paint is enamel, no prob; if it's an acrylic-based paint, you might have a more tedious search on your hands, maybe auto touch-up colors.

Last edited by DIMcyclist; 03-15-14 at 05:06 PM. Reason: Clarification.
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Old 03-15-14, 05:15 PM   #9
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id have to imagine the original paint is enamel. How do i test for acyrlic or enamel paint on the frame?

It stopped by a local craft store and bought some green, white, blue and yellow. Ive tried a few combos and come close but this is much tougher than it looks to get correct

i wish i could just bring the fork to homedepot and they could scan it with the paint matching machine and then brew me up a pint of enamel or whatever the smallest bit is.
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Old 03-16-14, 10:17 AM   #10
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Enamel will cure a lot harder.

My apologies Scale, to clarify- I was referring to whatever new paint you'll be applying, since acrylics & enamels don't mix while wet (unless we're talking 3-part auto paint, which is also solvent based).

Once the paint is dry it doesn't matter so much, but enamels will bond to acrylics better than acrylics will to dried enamel. That's because enamels are oil-based paints, and their solvents will bond to the latex element in acrylic once it's dried. However, acrylic (which is usually a water-based paint) won't bond as readily to enamel's oil base, which will (partially from curing 'hard')- naturally- repel it; if the enamel is dry, you CAN do it, but an acrylic will never completely bond to an enamel substrate and will eventually peel off (again, 3-part car paints being the exception).

The reason I suggested starting with the Bianchi Blue is that it's actually a trademarked color: it has a very specific formula, just like 'Ferrari Red' or 'Barbie Pink.' Ergo, starting with Bianchi's original color will (theoretically) save you a lot of mixing; all you'd have to do is tint it lighter or darker, more blue or more 'green' (by adding yellow), to match the shade on your frame- again, assuming the tinting paint is of the same type as Bianchi's own paint (enamel for enamel; acrylic for acrylic).

With regard to taking your fork in and having the color scanned, any shop that does custom auto color can actually do that for you, but more often than not, they'll just optically match the color in the same way I described in my earlier post. They'll get an exact match (it IS their job, after all), but they'll also take two weeks to do it and charge you upwards of $50 for the privilege, + paint, for something you can just as easily do on your own.

Edit- I take back what I said about a potentially tedious search if Bianchi's paint turns out to be acrylic; I just remembered that a lot of hobby paints nowadays are acrylic, for reasons of child safety & toxicity. So, a good hobby shop should have both kinds of paint on hand.

Good luck!

Last edited by DIMcyclist; 03-16-14 at 11:06 AM.
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Old 03-16-14, 11:11 AM   #11
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interesting. Thanks for the info. I actually got the testors paint in enamel. I figure acrylic wasnt correct because i had a notion that it wouldnt be very durable etc due to the paint type. I figured since it was kid friendly it was less industrial and would/could wash off and weather away under normal conditions.

That said, i applied some rustoleum white primer this morning to the affect area. That is drying now. Been emailing a few LBS bianchi dealers around here to see if anyone carries the little containers of the real deal. IF that stuff is acyrlic, I likely wont be able to mix my enamel with it. Ill have to find some acyrlic to mix with it.

The craft store i was at and got the paint yesterday had these art paint pens.....lots of them....
I dont know what kind of paint was in them or how durable they would be but they had A LOT of shades of green that might fit the bill.
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Old 03-16-14, 11:26 AM   #12
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Acrylic model paint is water based. You want enamel model paints. It should…might…mix well with the Bianchi touch up paint. But it might not. Only testing will tell.
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Old 03-16-14, 11:38 AM   #13
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Ive got some old bianchi bottle cages and i just did an overlay to see if they match this frame and my eyes have been looking at this for so long i cant tell. I think my frame is just a tinge darker but that might just be more from age than anything. I guess at the end of the day to doesnt really matter too much. Id rather do it right if i can though.

now that they are all cleaned up and primer is applied....and after much searching......i suppose i could just get pissed and paint them rust brown
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