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  1. #1
    If I own it, I ride it CV-6's Avatar
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    Should you drill flange spoke holes larger?

    My situation. I went to build some wheels and when I tried to insert the 2mm spokes I was using, they would not fit. Sometimes you have to screw them through the threaded part, but not this time. Will not accept 2mm. I found 1.8mm goes through fine. First time I have come across this. Pelissier 2000 (French) so somehow it figures. I am sure you can drill the holes larger, but should one drill them larger? Granted we are talking 0.1mm of material being removed and it is not like the spoke holes are right at the very edge. FWIW, the closest English size is 5/64 which is actually a bit undersize.

    So how about it. Drill or no drill? Or don't be a cheapskate and buy new spokes.
    Lynn Travers

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  2. #2
    Senior Member fender1's Avatar
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    I vote new spokes. Seems the most logical and easiest route.

  3. #3
    Senior Member rootboy's Avatar
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    I agree. Except. I would do it. I don't think you'd even need a drill press, Lynn. Bit in a hand held chuck/holder. Just a bit of a "reaming" motion, with maybe a light touch up with a small counter sink bit. A size 46 or 47 bit should do it. Or, a letter size bit might be easier to find.
    I may even have a small hand reamer you can use. Can check sizes, if you like. I have many small reamers.
    Last edited by rootboy; 04-12-14 at 05:41 PM.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Homebrew01's Avatar
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    If you do drill, put a bit of pressure towards the center of the hub so it takes material off mostly from the inside. Maybe the will also minimize affecting the chamfering where the spoke contacts the hub.
    Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    A drill is used to drill holes; a reamer is used to enlarge holes.

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    J T
    Mr Gorbachev, tear down this wall!

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    Senior Member rootboy's Avatar
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    Exactly JT. A straight flute hand reamer is the proper tool for this job. Not everyone has those of course. But I have some that may fit the bill if needed Lynn.
    "Without music to decorate it, time is just a bunch of boring production deadlines or dates by which bills must be paid."

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  7. #7
    26 tpi nut. sailorbenjamin's Avatar
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    They do it when restoring WWII GI Monarks. They say the steel is really hard on the old New Departure flanges and you go through a few bits getting it done.
    You're probably working with alloy, though, aren't you?
    I have spoken.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Michael Angelo's Avatar
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    I would use a Drill pin vise. That way you can control how much material you remove.

    Heavy Duty Pin Vise

  9. #9
    Senior Member rootboy's Avatar
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    Righty-O , MA. I can lend you one of those too, Lynn, along with the reamer, if you need it.
    "Without music to decorate it, time is just a bunch of boring production deadlines or dates by which bills must be paid."

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  10. #10
    Gearhead old's'cool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrew01 View Post
    If you do drill, put a bit of pressure towards the center of the hub so it takes material off mostly from the inside. Maybe the will also minimize affecting the chamfering where the spoke contacts the hub.
    I doubt that will make any difference. You would need to set the hub up on a mill and accurately locate the center of the enlarged hole you want to make, then machine the enlarged hole with a suitable end mill. Not that I recommend doing this.
    Geoff
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  11. #11
    Senior Member rootboy's Avatar
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    Yeah. A lot of extra work for just enlarging some holes a tenth of an mm.
    "Without music to decorate it, time is just a bunch of boring production deadlines or dates by which bills must be paid."

    Frank Zappa

  12. #12
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    Typically one has the opposite problem with holes being on the "sloppy" side.
    IF this is a front wheel, I think I'd "embrace it" and use some 15/16 DB spokes.
    If a rear, 15 straight on the DS and 15/16 DB on the NDS.

  13. #13
    Senior Member CMAW's Avatar
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    I just finished some polishing on a set of Pelissier 2000 hubs and without your post I would have ordered 2/1.5/2 spokes, so thanks for the heads up . Not being an excellent mechanic, I would however never touch the flange holes, and just buy new spokes, instead. Plus, we're not talking some Italian hub here, these are France's finest (wink, just to be on the safe side).

  14. #14
    If I own it, I ride it CV-6's Avatar
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    Been at work for a while.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
    Typically one has the opposite problem with holes being on the "sloppy" side.
    IF this is a front wheel, I think I'd "embrace it" and use some 15/16 DB spokes.
    If a rear, 15 straight on the DS and 15/16 DB on the NDS.
    Agree with the concern about making it sloppy. Not sure what you mean by "embrace it". The plan was to use straight gauge since the wheels were going on a gravel grinder. Never considered butted.

    Quote Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
    Yeah. A lot of extra work for just enlarging some holes a tenth of an mm.
    Yeah, it is a lot of work. I would hate to butcher these hubs and I have yet another Pelissier project in the works. It is real frustrating to have correct length spokes (even though recycled, so not out money there) and not be able to use them. I am beginning to think I am better off biting the bullet and buying the 1.8mm spokes. An expense I was not anticipating for either project, so these may go again to the back burner.
    Lynn Travers

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  15. #15
    Senior Member
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    I have always been an OEM type so that I never need to say "If only . . . "

    Another thought: "When all else fails, use OEM."

    Regards,
    J T
    Mr Gorbachev, tear down this wall!

  16. #16
    If I own it, I ride it CV-6's Avatar
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    Final report. I bought the right spokes and all is well. Well sort of. LOL. Recall these are Pelissier 2000 and the bearings got replaced. Replaced with better bearings. I have never had a wheel spin so long in the truing stand. So what's wrong? I kind of hate to use the wheels on a gravel grinder and that is what they were built for. So I guess I will use them on the Carré and go back to the old wheels. They were fine although the rims are a bit skinny and I wanted "toute Française".
    Lynn Travers

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