Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-09-14, 10:41 AM   #1
heliocopters
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 12
Kabuki Mixte

Hello, all. I recently went to a bike co-op and found a Kabuki Mixte (unsure about other specifics) in really great shape that looks like it's from the late 70s or 80s. It's $120. It will need fenders and probably a nicer saddle eventually. I hadn't heard of Kabuki before I saw that bike. I needed something really light that could easily get on and off bus bike racks, and it fulfills that need. I'll be using the bike for commuting (4 miles each way with hills) and leisure riding--I won't be running any races soon or doing anything all that athletic.

They're holding the bike for me up to a week while they tune it, and then I have 10 days to make a final decision. The volunteer at the co-op said he personally thought it was a nice bike, above entry-level, but said it would probably only go for $250 if it were being sold in a bike shop new today.

I just want to know if this is a good bike, at least for what I need it for, or if it's a piece of junk and if I should look for something better.

Thanks!
heliocopters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-14, 10:57 AM   #2
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
Posts: 16,812
What is the frame pedigree? (Alternatively, what is the seat post diameter, which in turn will tell us the tubing wall thickness?) Also, what sorts of components does it have? Kabuki was one of many bike boom marques from Japan. I am guessing you have found a fairly basic model, which may fit your needs pretty well, assuming it is light enough for you to lift as needed.
__________________
"Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-14, 11:44 AM   #3
Velocivixen 
Senior Member
 
Velocivixen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest
Bikes: 1978 Univega Gran Rally, 2015 Surly Straggler, 1985 Nishiki Riviera mixte, 1987 Miyata One Twelve mixte, '71 Raleigh Twenty, 1995 Trek 820
Posts: 3,647
I have 2 Mixtes & from what I've researched, most brands that offered Mixtes did not sell them as their highest end models. Not to say they're bad, but Mixte frames typically weren't outfitted with the highest end components of the time. For commuting, and general purpose riding they're fine bikes and, at least my two, are light.

[MENTION=70181]Helio[/MENTION]coptors - could you take some photos of the drive side of the bike & post? Tell us derailleurs, shift levers, brakes, rims/hubs, whether the bike is lugged or not, wheel size (27" likely, but may be 700c), handlebars drop or straight. This will help us understand.

Last edited by Velocivixen; 07-09-14 at 11:47 AM. Reason: asked a question to OP
Velocivixen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-14, 11:58 AM   #4
modelmartin
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Minneapols, Minnesota
Bikes: 89 Raleigh Technium PRE, 92 SP 1000 ti, '09 Team Pro, 72 International, 63 Hercules 3-spd, '81 Vitus 979, 2 Kabuki Submariners, 2 C. Itoh Submariners, Gary Fisher Big Sur, Skyway 3-spd, Robin Hood w/ S-A IGH 5 speed.
Posts: 519
Kabukis were made by Bridgestone and were produced from mid 70s to mid 80s. They are good quality basic bikes depending on the model. They made a full range from 21 lb steel framed road bikes to 35 pound cheaper bikes. The market is not kind to them as far as resale values but if you just want good basic transportation you can't go wrong. They have good interchangability with standard parts. They take cartridge bottom brackets and most older suntour, shimano derailleurs.

The biggest difference between their better offerings and low-end were the frames. the better ones have the frametubes set in a mold and the lugs are diecast around them. These use a quill seatpost so you have to take the seat off the post to adjust the height. They are beatiful frames and durable. The cheaper ones have normal lugged/brazed frames and are heavier.

I don't think you can go wrong for $120. as long as it needs nothing to be ready to ride.
modelmartin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-14, 12:20 PM   #5
heliocopters
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 12
Thank you for the information, everyone!

Unfortunately, I don't have a way to get to the co-op to take a picture as my car broke down (the reason I am purchasing a new bike). I would estimate the seat post would be about 1.5" in diameter or maybe smaller, or whatever the standard size would be for a decent road bike. It has drop bars, 10 or 12 speeds, and 27" wheels. Everything else you asked I'm either not sure of or don't know what it means. I can't remember if the shift leavers were plastic or metal, but I think they were plastic. I don't think there was a speck of rust on it, and I think the rims were aluminum...? The steel ones are pock-marked, right? Besides, he might replace the wheels for me, anyway.

I was looking at two other bikes at the co-op, but the volunteer really seemed to think the Kabuki was the better of the three. One was a Nishiki and the other was a Panasonic.
heliocopters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-14, 01:38 PM   #6
Velocivixen 
Senior Member
 
Velocivixen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest
Bikes: 1978 Univega Gran Rally, 2015 Surly Straggler, 1985 Nishiki Riviera mixte, 1987 Miyata One Twelve mixte, '71 Raleigh Twenty, 1995 Trek 820
Posts: 3,647
How the bike fits you is really important. The distance from the seat tube to where you'll be grabbing the handlebars is important because you don't want to be too stretched out or to scrunched up either. When sitting on the seat you want to be able to have your knee slightly bent when your foot is at the bottom of the pedal stroke. So that means that if the bike is smaller you'll have to have a lot of the seat post showing to get your saddle high enough. Not a problem, but want to make sure the current seat post is long enough to let you get it set up well. Also, aesthetically some people don't like too much
seat post showing.

Did you test ride any of the 3? Definitely test ride, shift gears, go around the block or around some turns at least. Keep us posted.
Velocivixen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-14, 01:45 PM   #7
heliocopters
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 12
Velocivixen, I test rode all three, but the other two were diamond frames, which I wasn't crazy about. They all fit me well; the Kabuki's seat needed to be raised about 2 inches from the lowest place, so no big deal. I'll be able to test ride it again before I purchase.
heliocopters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-14, 02:47 PM   #8
browngw 
Senior Member
 
browngw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Port Dover Ontario Canada
Bikes: 1958 Sun Cresta, 1971 Robin Hood Sports, 1976 SuperCycle Excalibur, 1979 Raleigh DL1 Tourist, 2014 Salsa Vaya, 2016 Giant ATX27.5, 2012 Giant Halfway Folder,1993 Raleigh Portage MTB and others
Posts: 665
As stated above Kubakis were made by Bridgestone. Bridgestone also made some bikes for Sporting Goods Stores(Canadian Tire) in the 70's. I have a 76 SuperCycle Excalibur also known as a Kubaki Superlight. It has a bonded Alloy Frame and is a decent all round bike. I like it well enough thatI'm currently restoring it for my collection.
__________________
We are what we reflect. We are the changes that we bring to this world. Ride often. -Geo.-
browngw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-14, 03:37 PM   #9
oddjob2 
Still learning
 
oddjob2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: North of Canada, Adirondacks, NNJ
Bikes: Too many
Posts: 9,296
It would be highly unlikely that the Kabuki mixte is anything but a high tensile frame. Probably chrome rims too, and a funky quill seat post, with no binder bolt. Overhauled and tuned $120 is cheap, but personally I would look out for a more exciting and responsive mixte to ride.
__________________
Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. Albert Einstein
2016 Additions: 1981 Miyata 1000, 1981 Schwinn Voyageur 11.8 chrome, Schwinn Paramount 50th Anniversary, Dawes Galaxy, Raleigh International, 1985 Raleigh Alyeska
oddjob2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-14, 06:46 PM   #10
Grand Bois
Senior Member
 
Grand Bois's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pinole, CA, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 16,481
I wouldn't recommend a Kabuki to anyone. I have a Bridgestone Kabuki Submariner. It gets a lot of attention because of the shiny stainless steel tubes, but it's an over weight piece of crap despite the fact that it's a stripped down single speed with lightweight replacement parts. I rarely ride it. Potential buyers lose interest once they lift it.



Hold out for a better mixte, like a Peugeot or Raleigh Super Course.
Grand Bois is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-14, 08:15 PM   #11
heliocopters
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grand Bois View Post
I wouldn't recommend a Kabuki to anyone. I have a Bridgestone Kabuki Submariner. It gets a lot of attention because of the shiny stainless steel tubes, but it's an over weight piece of crap despite the fact that it's a stripped down single speed with lightweight replacement parts. I rarely ride it. Potential buyers lose interest once they lift it.



Hold out for a better mixte, like a Peugeot or Raleigh Super Course.
The one at the co-op was ultra-light. It was one of the lightest bikes I've encountered. Perhaps it was a better model? Sadly I can't "hold out" too long. I need to get to work and I can only bum rides for so long before no one likes me anymore. So far I've heard mixed things about Kabuki so I'm still unsure. I'm still keeping a vigilant eye on Craigslist, but so far the Kabuki looks like my best bet on my budget.
heliocopters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-14, 09:31 PM   #12
Thumpic 
Senior Member
 
Thumpic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: The Sunny South
Bikes:
Posts: 1,846
I had 1 several years ago...high tensile and cast lugs........well made with great paint.......
Attached Images
File Type: jpg kabuki2.jpg (103.2 KB, 27 views)
File Type: jpg kabuki7.jpg (74.9 KB, 16 views)
__________________
Thumpic....

Green is the new "CHEAP"
Thumpic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-14, 06:02 AM   #13
heliocopters
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumpic View Post
I had 1 several years ago...high tensile and cast lugs........well made with great paint.......
YES! That's the one! But in dark red, and I can't tell in your photo if that bike has the split bar, or whatever those fancy mixte frame bars are called, but the one at the co-op did--two parallel bars with the seat post in between. High-tensile sounds like a good thing I guess? I don't know exactly what that means. Sounds like you liked it...
heliocopters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-14, 06:16 AM   #14
oddjob2 
Still learning
 
oddjob2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: North of Canada, Adirondacks, NNJ
Bikes: Too many
Posts: 9,296
High tensile is considered low strength tubing, consequently thicker heavier gauge tubes are needed than the higher quality chromoly or manganese moly tubes to achieve adequate stiffness. Also, high tensile tubes are generally straight gauge, versus, butted tubing, which is thinner in the middle and thicker at the ends.

The benefit is lower cost for the manufacturer, the penalty is heavier frame and less responsive ride.
__________________
Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. Albert Einstein
2016 Additions: 1981 Miyata 1000, 1981 Schwinn Voyageur 11.8 chrome, Schwinn Paramount 50th Anniversary, Dawes Galaxy, Raleigh International, 1985 Raleigh Alyeska
oddjob2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-14, 09:39 AM   #15
michael k
Senior Member
 
michael k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Portland,Or
Bikes:
Posts: 1,059
Show us your mixte (mhendricks' new happy place)
michael k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-14, 10:20 AM   #16
Velocivixen 
Senior Member
 
Velocivixen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest
Bikes: 1978 Univega Gran Rally, 2015 Surly Straggler, 1985 Nishiki Riviera mixte, 1987 Miyata One Twelve mixte, '71 Raleigh Twenty, 1995 Trek 820
Posts: 3,647
@ Heliocoptors- you have some good advice as posted. I will say that you have posted your information & questions on a forum where many are so knowledgeable & can give you extremely detailed information, that as a "newby" can begin to get overwhelming. I'm not suggesting that you are overwhelmed. As a newish rider who needs transportation quick, I think that getting too detailed information can lead to "analysis paralysis" & lead to indecision. I am only speaking from my own experience. I am extremely detail oriented but I know, as one who is new to all the relevant bike information, I had to learn to take my new learning a in small "doses" otherwise I simply would agonize over decisions. This would lead to indecision, and perhaps the bike in question would have already sold.

I understand, from what you've shared, that you need reliable transportation quick & are on a budget, so I understand that you want to "do it right the first time" & get something to meet your needs. I guess what I'm suggesting is to not get too caught up in various aspects of, for example, one type of steel tubing vs another, etc. Just get some basic information - enough to make a reasonable decision. For the more advanced rider/collector/connoisseur then the fine details do matter.

I dont want want my comments to dissuade you from learning more about bicycles if that's your interest, but would like to encourage you to go with confidence and buy your bike. You may, down the line, decide on a different bike but that doesn't necessarily mean that you made a "bad" decision or bought the "wrong" bike - tastes & needs evolve.

Best of luck & happy riding. Hope you've budgeted for things like a lock, rack/fenders (if that's your preference), lights and any other things which might make your commute enjoyable.
Velocivixen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-14, 10:39 AM   #17
Lascauxcaveman 
Senior Member
 
Lascauxcaveman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Pacific Northwest
Bikes: A green one, "Ragleigh," or something.
Posts: 4,088
For the price, it sounds like a solid deal, especially freshly tuned up and ready to ride. If it feels light to you, then good enough, eh? If it really is Hi-Ten steel, then its probably somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 lbs, which would be lighter than a generic cheap mountain bike, and a much nicer ride.
__________________
● 1971 Grandis SL ● 1972 Lambert Grand Prix frankenbike ● 1972 Raleigh Super Course fixie ● 1972 Peugeot UE-18 Mixte ● 1980 Apollo "Legnano" ● 1982 Bianchi Limited ● 1983 Nishiki Landau ● 1984 Peugeot Vagabond ● 1985 Trek 600 ● 1985 Shogun Prairie Breaker ● 1985 Raleigh Elkhorn ● 1986 Univega Nuovo Sport ● 1986 DeRosa Professional ● 1986 Merckx Super Corsa ● 1987 Schwinn Tempo ● 1990 Cannondale ST600 ●1996 Kona Lava Dome ● And a Bike to Be Named Later ●
Lascauxcaveman is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-14, 11:36 AM   #18
heliocopters
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 12
Thanks again for the advice, everyone!
[MENTION=355580]Velocivixen[/MENTION], I appreciate all of the information you have provided. I would eventually like to be a true bicycle fanatic, so it's all very helpful. Luckily I have locks and lights from my current bike and all it will need is fenders and possibly a rack. I will probably go ahead with the Kabuki unless when I get there to pick it up there is something I couldn't possibly ignore.
heliocopters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-14, 12:00 PM   #19
kc0yef
Senior Member
 
kc0yef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Olympia WA
Bikes: Bill Stevenson Kawai, 1973 Paramount, Voyageur SP, Nishiki; KOKUSAI & Competition, Bridgestone; RBT RB-T & Kabuki Submariner, Mercian; Campionissimo, TriA, Superlight, , Fuji Touring Series IV, 1969 Gitane TDF
Posts: 1,098



http://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/812670-bridgestone-kabuki-submariner-what.html

I paid a little more for mine but it had those nice Campagnolo pedals on it



kc0yef is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:14 PM.