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Old 08-08-14, 04:51 PM   #26
dddd
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..I will get rid of the turkey levers,...
And here I am, wishing that I had installed turkey levers before I did the final wrap on the bars...

Oh, well...

Oh, and Top506, really looking forward to seeing the '60's version!

My next project may be my old '63 Sierra (re-named version of electroforged, triple, "Super Continental").
I may start out on that one with a pair of 11sp Record Ergolevers that I recently found in the trash, but wanting to do my first repaint first.
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Old 08-08-14, 07:08 PM   #27
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Is there any advantage with going to a 700 wheel? Any issues with keeping 27 inch?
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Old 08-08-14, 07:14 PM   #28
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Is there any advantage with going to a 700 wheel? Any issues with keeping 27 inch?
You would get more tire choices. Its only a 4 mm difference so brake reach isn't a big hassle. If you want to keep the original spec out of respect for the bike's vintage character, you could do that as well.
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Old 08-08-14, 08:20 PM   #29
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Is there any advantage with going to a 700 wheel? Any issues with keeping 27 inch?
...I actually built wheels for it and used 27" rims from Sun (IIRC), not so much for any
reason other than I knew I wanted to go with relatively wide tires, and I think that the
bike looks better with them proportionately to the rest of the frame.

I don't think there's any performance advantage one way or the other, but it is true
that the selection of good tires in 700c is exponentially larger than 27" tires.

Again, I don't see this as a real high performance, lightweight speed machine, so
I did not intend to put high end tires on it......if 27" look at Panaracers or Schwalbe,
and buy them online from someone like bike tires direct.

I think mine currently has the Performance house brand tire on it, in 27 x 1 1/4 and it
does about as well as I want it to do. I'm thinking about fenders and a rack with panniers,
just because it's already a little heavy, and would make a good utility bicycle cycle.

If you make sure the frame and wheels are aligned and dished correctly, it goes downhill
like it's on rails. Very confidence inspiring. As i already stated, it's a guad builder on the ups.
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Old 08-08-14, 08:43 PM   #30
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If I see a general "theme" with many of these resto-mod Supersports, it might be an "economical Rivendell".

I tried riding mine in stone-stock condition, for both style points and economic considerations as well as the "preservation" aspect espoused by collectors of more-haughty marques.

It quickly evolved, and I achieved a more-aggressive fit, an extra cog in back (with tighter gearing and shorter-cage allvit modified for 6-sp), a lighter (more-adjustable) seat and post, plus clipless pedals, 9-sp chain, lever hoods and a wider, standard handlebar.

The rest I think is all stock, but with plastic housing liners slipped into original brake cable housings, Matthauser front pads, and I hand-fitted a cut-to-width layer of wide Velox tape (to prevent tire bead blow-off above 75psi with my 1-1/8" tires). I also found Tange 12-ball, #64 chromium bearing retainers for the bottom bracket, not that they were really needed.

It's a 1971 as well:


[IMG] by dddd2002, on Flickr[/IMG]
Nice bike. What is the water bottle cage?

Thanks, Dick
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Old 08-09-14, 12:22 AM   #31
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Nice bike. What is the water bottle cage?

Thanks, Dick
Thanks, Dick. The cage is an Italian REG brand cage, it's forty-something years old, but I found a couple of these new on Ebay for $30 a piece. Came all the way from Cyprus, near the middle east.

These have integral clamps and a flip-lever that clamps the bottle, holding it securely in place.
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Old 08-09-14, 06:00 AM   #32
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Is there any advantage with going to a 700 wheel? Any issues with keeping 27 inch?
I'm running 700c wheels on my '75 Sports Tourer. The centerpull brakes had enough reach to accommodate the 4mm reduction in diameter. One nice benefit is the ability to run modern 700c light weight fenders with wider tires on the vintage fillet brazed frame.

As far as keeping the 27" wheels there are no issues. Good to excellent 27" tires are plentiful. You can even watch ebay for original Schwinn chrome fenders if you like.
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Old 08-09-14, 11:45 AM   #33
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Thanks, Dick. The cage is an Italian REG brand cage, it's forty-something years old, but I found a couple of these new on Ebay for $30 a piece. Came all the way from Cyprus, near the middle east.

These have integral clamps and a flip-lever that clamps the bottle, holding it securely in place.
Thanks dddd! Just found one on fleabay (California rather than Cyprus) and bought it. It'll look nice on my 71 Schwinn World Voyageur.

Regards, Dick
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Old 08-09-14, 07:24 PM   #34
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Thanks again everyone for the advice...I really appreciate your input, and enjoy seeing what you have done to your bikes...
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Old 08-09-14, 08:33 PM   #35
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I took this as a philosophical statement of sorts, but then wondered, what, exactly, the Super Sport "should have" been?

The Super Sport was and is a weird bike, not that it wasn't aimed at a market where other, almost similarly-heavy ten-speeds existed, but took an entirely different approach at this price point, just as the Varsity/Continental took quality/durability and weight to unheard-of levels in the entry-level market, while commanding relatively premium prices in the process.

Schwinn must be given credit for doing things their own way, with rigorous testing and development, and enhanced specifications of remaining parts that they procured from overseas vendors.
And Schwinn followed up with effective marketing.

As a U.S. brand, the Super Sport persisted with 1/2" pedals, and their in-house bottom brackets, kickstands and headsets were of elevated durability.
Their frames and forks were also made to heftier-than-normal standards, the better to resist flexing under heavy riders, and to better hold up to riding skills perhaps honed on an earlier generation's balloon-tire bikes.
As such, these might best be called "stepping stone lightweights", perfect for getting into "lightweight" road riding more gradually, or for holding up to years of tough commuter service.

But, since the rims on these were alloy, the balance of the components, such as the crankset and shifters/derailers, could have also been as such, but they left a higher price point in place for just such a slightly-different model.

And the oddball Allvit derailer, especially the Supersport's more vertically-disposed "long-cage" model, was only odd in that nobody else seemed to spec this rather slow-shifting version, while Schwinn simply wanted to offer riders lower gearing, without the complexity of a triple.

Lastly, the Super Sport's frame geometry angles, of the limited number of frame sizes offered, was made exactly the same as the company's premium Paramount road lineup, fully 3 degrees steeper (at 73 degrees) than the electroforged frames offered at the very next lower price levels, and this more than anything else distinguished a SuperSport from a Continental, in spite of the Continental's pounds-heavier wheelset.
Heh.
Here I thought they were just going after sales to the Chevy guys.
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Old 08-10-14, 11:05 AM   #36
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Heh.
Here I thought they were just going after sales to the Chevy guys.
You're right on the money there, since the "mag-style" chainwheels distracted the "Chevy" buyer from knowing that there was anything "wrong" with having an Ashtabula crankset on a "lightweight" bike.

Good marketing strategy, given the times? They did sell a lot of these.

And besides, Ashtabula cranks ROCK!
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Old 08-10-14, 05:31 PM   #37
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Does anyone know if a brooks b72 saddle will fit on a 71 super sport? Its all stock and read somewhere that it might not fit because of stem... was just wondering if someone knew for sure... or if there is a brooks saddle that will definitely fit
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Old 08-10-14, 06:20 PM   #38
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Does anyone know if a brooks b72 saddle will fit on a 71 super sport? Its all stock and read somewhere that it might not fit because of stem... was just wondering if someone knew for sure... or if there is a brooks saddle that will definitely fit
The factory saddle was a Brooks B17. A B72 should fit with the right clamp, but those are made to be more comfortable in a more upright position than you'll have with the factory SS drop bars.
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Old 08-10-14, 06:24 PM   #39
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Good marketing strategy, given the times? They did sell a lot of these.
It must have been a reliable strategy, since they used it earlier on with the Cadillac, Corvette, Jaguar, Hornet, Wasp etc.
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Old 08-10-14, 06:59 PM   #40
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the factory saddle was a brooks b15.
fify
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Old 08-10-14, 09:07 PM   #41
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Thanks for the tip on the b72 hudson
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Old 08-10-14, 09:44 PM   #42
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Its successor is the well named Super Sport DBX.

The 2006 Schwinn is just where Schwinn would have gone had the company survived to carry on the line.

Its built in the tradition of a sports touring bike. Ignaz Schwinn would be proud of it.
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Old 08-11-14, 02:11 AM   #43
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Its successor is the well named Super Sport DBX.

The 2006 Schwinn is just where Schwinn would have gone had the company survived to carry on the line.

Its built in the tradition of a sports touring bike. Ignaz Schwinn would be proud of it.
I'm having trouble imagining Ignaz Schwinn being proud of a bike made entirely in China.

Schwinn was a company that made bikes to higher quality/durability standards than their competitors, yet this modern one looks made about like everybody else's generic China-sourced bike. What's to distinguish it as a Schwinn?

Not that I have anything against modern Schwinns, and when I buy a bike to flip that came from a department store, my first and nearly only choice is a front-suspended Schwinn MTB that is sold by Target.
I've had pretty good luck with those, but for the suspension forks taking in water from the vented top caps, which rusts up the springs inside and makes the fork action sticky. These forks are actually held together by the springs(!), seriously, so must be carefully examined for deep rust-pitting of the sort that might cause one or both of the springs to break.
Considering what these sell for new, I often wonder if I should bother with them, but they seem to ride rather well and the always-medium size fits most adults I'd say.

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Old 08-11-14, 05:21 AM   #44
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fify
Ah, yes of course. Just goes to show I can't believe everything I think.
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Old 08-11-14, 07:35 AM   #45
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I'm having trouble imagining Ignaz Schwinn being proud of a bike made entirely in China.

Schwinn was a company that made bikes to higher quality/durability standards than their competitors, yet this modern one looks made about like everybody else's generic China-sourced bike. What's to distinguish it as a Schwinn?

Not that I have anything against modern Schwinns, and when I buy a bike to flip that came from a department store, my first and nearly only choice is a front-suspended Schwinn MTB that is sold by Target.
I've had pretty good luck with those, but for the suspension forks taking in water from the vented top caps, which rusts up the springs inside and makes the fork action sticky. These forks are actually held together by the springs(!), seriously, so must be carefully examined for deep rust-pitting of the sort that might cause one or both of the springs to break.
Considering what these sell for new, I often wonder if I should bother with them, but they seem to ride rather well and the always-medium size fits most adults I'd say.

Its a dealer quality bike FYI, made in Taiwan. The dealer Schwinns are as good or even better than the Chicago Schwinns made back in the day. The quality is outstanding and these bikes have nothing in common with the bottom of the barrel Walmart Schwinns. They're in an entirely different league altogether.
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Old 08-11-14, 09:34 AM   #46
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Its a dealer quality bike FYI, made in Taiwan. The dealer Schwinns are as good or even better than the Chicago Schwinns made back in the day. The quality is outstanding and these bikes have nothing in common with the bottom of the barrel Walmart Schwinns. They're in an entirely different league altogether.
Nevertheless, the only thing Schwinn about it is the decals.
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Old 08-11-14, 11:48 AM   #47
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How many bike companies today still manufacture their own bikes? If it was just Schwinn, that would be a valid point.
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Old 08-11-14, 12:40 PM   #48
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Does anyone know if a brooks b72 saddle will fit on a 71 super sport? Its all stock and read somewhere that it might not fit because of stem... was just wondering if someone knew for sure... or if there is a brooks saddle that will definitely fit
The saddle should fit, but you might have to use an old style seat post and clamp. Saddles have been mostly interchangeable for a very long time, but seat posts differ considerably.
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Old 08-11-14, 12:59 PM   #49
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Is there any advantage with going to a 700 wheel? Any issues with keeping 27 inch?
It's not a real big advantage when it comes to old bikes. The biggest advantage IMO is that a cheap, used 700c wheelset will probably come with a freehub and cassette while the 27" will likely have a freewheel. Of course that means you'll have to convert to a 7+ speed rear end, so perhaps that's not what you want. The 700c will have a better tire selection, but the selection available for 27" is still OK. Rim selection for 700C is much better as well, but are you really going to shell out big bucks for a new wheelset for a '71 Schwinn?

The biggest downside is that you will need to adjust your brakes out 4mm further and this will give your calipers a little less leverage.
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Old 08-11-14, 01:15 PM   #50
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Its a dealer quality bike FYI, made in Taiwan. The dealer Schwinns are as good or even better than the Chicago Schwinns made back in the day. The quality is outstanding and these bikes have nothing in common with the bottom of the barrel Walmart Schwinns. They're in an entirely different league altogether.
I might be beating a dead horse at this point, but I googled and found the first search result for the 2006 Super Sport DBX on the WallMart website, for $450 iir.

But what is our definition of the quality being "outstanding"?

I notice it carries an ISIS bottom bracket, made by whom I don't know, but not so much good about these.

I notice the WalMart site appears to be a drop-shipper for Bikewagon, an ebay store, and with shop assembly recommended.

Seems odd that WalMart is listing a bike described as a 2006 model, but that might make this an overstock-clearance item.

Componentry seems to make the bike a fair deal, competitive with other internet bargain sites that bypass bicycle shop distribution at least.

Again, I can't see much possibility of Ignaz Schwinn being proud of Chinese made bikes being distributed by whoever is willing to buy a truckload of them as 8-year-old overstock.
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