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  1. #1
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    Found a 1974? Peugeot UO-8, rebuild incoming!

    peugeot.jpg
    peugeot2.jpg
    peugeot3.jpg

    My neighbor has been collecting bikes since the 50's, and as luck would have it, he's trying to thin out his garage collection, so I picked this up for $0 and a handshake. I'm not yet convinced of the age and model. Although, by the quick release hubs, and the stickers, I'm leaning towards a 1974 UO-8. Although I can't find any evidence of a UO-8 with full chrome front forks.

    I spent a few years as a mechanic in a bike shop, and I have a good workspace at my house.

    So the adventure begins!

    All parts seem to be in working order, I don't think I will be forced to replace any, but I am tempted to update the ride with aero brakes, SIS, lighter cranks, etc.

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZMacGirthy View Post
    I'm leaning towards a 1974 UO-8. Although I can't find any evidence of a UO-8 with full chrome front forks.
    Seems like the right ballpark for the age. Some of the replacement parts make it a little harder to tell for sure. The rear derailleur is (thankfully) not original, nor are the brake calipers or fork.

    Quote Originally Posted by ZMacGirthy View Post
    ...but I am tempted to update the ride with aero brakes, SIS, lighter cranks, etc.
    Aero brakes? No problem. I put a pair of cheap Tektro levers on my UO-8 and they work fine.

    SIS? Good luck. For one thing, there's no derailleur hanger. You have to use a claw-mounted derailleur, which can't be aligned as precisely or consistently. Secondly, the seat stay protrudes pretty far inboard from the dropout. Even if you spread the frame to take a 126 or 130 mm hub, the seat stay may rub the chain when on the small cog of a 7+ speed freewheel or cassette. I ran into this problem on my UO-8, so I went with a 6-speed freewheel.

    Lighter cranks? Absolutely possible, but if you want to update from the bike's cottered cranks, you'll need to find a French-threaded bottom bracket. Velo Orange sells a French-threaded cartridge bottom bracket. I found a NOS French-threaded Tange cup-and-cone BB for my bike.

    Another common upgrade for UO-8's is to swap the steel rims for an alloy set. Aluminum rims are generally lighter and provide for much better braking when wet.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Uncle Randy's Avatar
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    There's a collection of Peugeot catalogs in PDF format here:
    Index of /PDFs



  4. #4
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    Thanks folks!

    I think I'm going to go with newer mid range components. I don't have any illusions about being able to sell the bike for profit, I just want to rebuild, upgrade it for fun. So, that said, I'm going to take your advice on the Velo Orange bottom bracket, pick up some decent cranks, aluminum wheels and seat-post, new seat, bars and stem, etc.

    Not sure what to do with the drive train though. Without a proper derailleur hanger, my options seem to be limited. I am lucky that I have a ton of used bike shops in the area though, so I might be able to find the parts in town.

  5. #5
    Rides Majestic
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    I did just such a project this spring. The derailleur hanger attached to the Honor derailleur on there now might work just fine, just unscrew the derailleur from it. There are also French BB cups available from Action for under $15, your LBS should be able to order them, you'll just need a crank and spindle. Seatpost on mine was 25.6mm, niagaracycle has them. Stem and bars are French sized (22.0mm stem, 25mm bar clamp), so 22.2mm quill stems won't work, I just kept the originals. I put 6 speed Shimano SIS clamp DT shifters with a Deore Lx rear and Z series front derailleur (shimmed because seat tube diameter is smaller). Wheels are 700c with 700x35mm paselas, the Mafac brakes had plenty of reach. Check out Sheldon Brown's article on French bikes as well as Mytenspeeds.com. There is good info on the ins and outs of working on French bikes. Good luck, and I look forward to some progress updates.

    Hope it's not too tacky to post a pic of mine, but maybe you'll find it interesting as it's exactly what you're doing.
    Last edited by likebike23; 08-07-14 at 09:52 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Shp4man's Avatar
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    Welcome! I'm currently rebuilding an old Pug, too. Best of luck to you.
    "Life is like a ten speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use." -Charles M. Schulz

  7. #7
    Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race dddd's Avatar
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    I think that the fork is possibly stock. The half-painted part often loses it's paint from the poor adhesion to chrome, and a previous owner may have finished the job with stripper or with steel wool as I did.

    I recommend doing modifications one at a time. In this way, the most urgently-need items that scream for attention while riding get done first, without compromising other items.

    I usually learn a lot about how a bike fits during the first few rides, also how it handles and so what kind of riding and where that I am likely to use it, which helps me to decide what if any gearing changes need to be made.

    I would start with a general tune-up, done initially with just good oil fed in from external openings. Subsequent rides will readily coach you in what direction to go from there, and to decide if the bike has the sort of riding fit and feel to make subsequent investments worthwhile.

    I would keep the usefully-geared, classy cotter-cranks on board at almost all costs. It should work fine with your choice of modern freewheel and chain and if you feed in some Phil oil you'll be able to put off worrying about bottom bracket servicing for a pretty good long time.

    If a claw hanger is used with an indexing derailer, it might be worthwhile to get the alignment checked or to do a careful visual check yourself, but I can usually wing it a bit with 6 or 7-speed freewheels and arrive at perfect index shifting.

    Note that the protruding derailer hanger bolt/nut may contact rotating parts of the freewheel or the chain itself, so I often "massage" the protruding pieces down using a file or Dremel grinder.
    Any contact between chain and chainstay end might be as much a function of small cog size, axle position or of the freewheel and hub, but these things can be worked around if necessary with axle spacers or choice of freewheel. Modern chains of course have more running clearance here just as they do at the front derailer cage.

    Cool, cool color on that Pug! No telling which direction this bike will take.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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    If the fork has a seam all the way down both legs it is a Peugeot fork. All of the non-Reynolds Peugeot forks of that era have that seam. The forks are formed from sheet stock and the seam is not welded.

  9. #9
    Senior Member markk900's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
    Lighter cranks? Absolutely possible, but if you want to update from the bike's cottered cranks, you'll need to find a French-threaded bottom bracket. Velo Orange sells a French-threaded cartridge bottom bracket. I found a NOS French-threaded Tange cup-and-cone BB for my bike.
    Back in the day (mid 70s) I did replace the OEM cups on my AO-8 with Sugino as I added a Mighty Compe crank. Fast forward 40-odd years and while I still have the Sugino cups I also have the originals, and they have worked fine for a variety of cotterless crank axles I have tried (Campag, SR and Sugino). Unless the cups are toast you might want to save the money.

  10. #10
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    The original cups on my UO-8 were "thin walled". I could've reused them, but I would've needed a spindle meant for a 70 mm (e.g. Italian) bottom bracket. If I used a spindle meant for a 68 mm bottom bracket, the adjustable cup would thread in so far that there wouldn't be enough threads exposed for the lockring to grab.

  11. #11
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Optimized-2009-06-13.jpgBy 1973 they had moved the shifters to the stem (boo hiss). Fortunately, this mistake was corrected in 1974. What is the serial number of your Peugeot?

    Here is my 1970 transportation beater, which I bought as a bare frame when I worked at a dealership. My forks are not OEM -- they have less fork rake, and therefore a bit of toe-to-tire overlap, even with the 700Cx28 front wheel I currently use and the 165mm crankset.
    Last edited by John E; 08-08-14 at 02:08 PM.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
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  12. #12
    Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race dddd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grand Bois View Post
    If the fork has a seam all the way down both legs it is a Peugeot fork. All of the non-Reynolds Peugeot forks of that era have that seam. The forks are formed from sheet stock and the seam is not welded.
    I'm sure that the fork legs have to be welded closed to be safe, not that these welded seams have not been known to open every so often, at which point not safe to ride imo.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dddd View Post
    I'm sure that the fork legs have to be welded closed to be safe, not that these welded seams have not been known to open every so often, at which point not safe to ride imo.
    I don't think they're welded, since that would close the seam. I'm not willing to sacrifice one to find out for sure.

  14. #14
    Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race dddd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grand Bois View Post
    I don't think they're welded, since that would close the seam. I'm not willing to sacrifice one to find out for sure.
    You can see the texture of the weld if you look closely, since the chrome highlights any surface undulations.

    But surely the fork leg tube would have to be welded, in order for the next manufacturing steps where the leg gets raked.
    Any non-welded seam would pop wide open during the raking process, and I think this is when some of these seam welds occasionally partially failed, to be discovered later on customer's bikes.

    A tube with an un-welded seam loses a LOT of it's strength and stiffness, so would have to be very, very thick-walled to equal the strength/stiffness of welded or seamless tubing.

  15. #15
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    I found some info on the Gitaneusa forum concerning Peugeot forks used on many models: gitaneusa.com :: View topic - Wooden Plug. The author, verktyg says they are rolled and brazed sheet metal. I would imagine if the fork blades were not brazed or welded that we would have heard many, many stories of forks failing.

  16. #16
    What??? Only 2 wheels? jimmuller's Avatar
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    Maybe someone will disagree with me (and I may actually be wrong) but that looks like an original fork crown. Maybe someone stripped the paint off the original fork?
    Real cyclists use toe clips.
    jimmuller

  17. #17
    Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race dddd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post
    Maybe someone will disagree with me (and I may actually be wrong) but that looks like an original fork crown. Maybe someone stripped the paint off the original fork?

    That was my first comment, having stripped one of these forks myself not so long ago.

    Moral of story is to never throw a chromed-tip fork away, since it can be stripped and used as a replacement for any other compatible bike such as a Motobecane.

    As for the brazed seam along the UO8 fork blades, that sort of surprised me. I didn't figure that a brazed seam would likely hold up to the blade-raking process, and apparently sometimes they do split open!

  18. #18
    Senior Member Chombi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grand Bois View Post
    I don't think they're welded, since that would close the seam. I'm not willing to sacrifice one to find out for sure.
    My 82 PH10S with Carbolite 103 tubing had that "seam" at the back of the fork legs. IIRC, It looked more like a narrow groove or trough with sharpish right angles than a typical welding seam though. Must be a product of some automated welding process...... But I did through the years, read/heard of a lot of people saying that the Carbolite 103 forks from Peugeot had welded seam fork legs.

  19. #19
    What??? Only 2 wheels? jimmuller's Avatar
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    The fork on my UO8 has a visible seam along the back of each blade, and it has held up for 42 years. I never worried about whether it was welded or not.
    Real cyclists use toe clips.
    jimmuller

  20. #20
    verktyg verktyg's Avatar
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    I discovered the seamed fork blades when I tried to straighten a slightly bent Peugeot fork at our shop in 1974. I was using a fork/frame straightening jack and the blades split like banana peels.

    JackFrameStraightener1.jpg

    PeugeotU08Fork2.jpg

    PeugeotU08ForkWithArrow.jpg

    Notice the split steel sleeve in the steering tube.

    Peugeot used seamed straight gage "pipe" with these sleeves brazed inside for their steering tubes

    Peugeot made millions of bikes with these cheap brazed sheet steel blades. They'll work fine unless you ever need to straighten them!

    From some time immemorial, until the 1980s they were used on models all the way up to the PR10. The French were notoriously frugal - a centime saved was at least half a croissant earned!

    verktyg

    Chas.
    Last edited by verktyg; 08-09-14 at 12:49 AM.
    Things aren't always what the seem... Don't believe everything you think!

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  21. #21
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    Thank you everyone, I'm so impressed by the outpouring of information and advice. Likebike23, thanks for posting the pic, your ride is gorgeous and it gives me something to shoot for! I'll be sure to post pics as the process continues.

    As advised, I plan to start with a general tuneup, probably this weekend. Take it for a spin and see what I learn. I'll post pics and ride results when it's complete. I'm definitely planning on replacing the stem, I've read enough about the "Death Stem" in the last few days to put me off for good!

    I have all the standard tools I should need; crankpuller, spoke wrench, chainbreaker, cone wrenches, headset and bottom bracket tools, etc. But I assume I will need to replace a few of them with tools specific to the French sizes. Does anyone have suggestions for tools that are "Must haves," specific to older Peugeot, as I start this project?

    Thanks again!

  22. #22
    Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race dddd's Avatar
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    Right off the top of my head, I can't think of any French-, or Peugeot-specific tools to work on this bike. Many components are French-spec though, the freewheel threading, the stem quill diameter, the front derailer clamp, the headset, the bottom bracket and the pedal threading. The seatpost is also a pretty specific size to Peugeot I believe, and the freewheel remover tool will be specific to the bike's particular brand of freewheel.

  23. #23
    verktyg verktyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZMacGirthy View Post
    As advised, I plan to start with a general tuneup, probably this weekend. Take it for a spin and see what I learn. I'll post pics and ride results when it's complete. I'm definitely planning on replacing the stem, I've read enough about the "Death Stem" in the last few days to put me off for good!
    As dddd mentioned, one thing you should consider is getting some aluminum rimmed wheels. The frame and the wheels are the 2 most important parts of a bike like yours. They determine the ride and handling characteristics. The rest of the components are not as important.

    The frames on U0-8 bikes have a very nice ride for an entry level model.

    Your bike has 27" wheels which are getting pretty scarce since the slightly smaller 700c wheels became the de facto standard for light weight sporting bikes.

    One other thing, I'd recommend changing all the cables and cable housings. The newer housings have plastic liners which make them a lot smoother to use.

    verktyg

    Chas.
    Things aren't always what the seem... Don't believe everything you think!

    Chas.

  24. #24
    Rides Majestic
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    @ZMacGirthy: Thanks for the compliment. Good luck on your build, if you have any questions, let us know. As for French specific tools, I didn't need any. You'll need the common tools that any bike would require. Metric allen wrenches, 13-16mm cone wrenches, a metric open end wrench set, pedal wrench, chain tool, 12" adjustable wrench, screwdrivers, Park hcw-4 bottom bracket tool, maybe a Park hcw-5 (or channel locks), tire levers, etc. If you are planning to use the wheels over and want to service the hub bearings, just have the LBS remove the freewheel for around $5. The tool for the Normandy freewheels costs about $40, too much for the amount I'd use it.
    @verktyg: Thanks for chiming in. I wasn't sure if you were a member here, but now that you've chimed in I remember reading some of your posts. Thanks for clarifying the fork issue. I also enjoyed reading your posts about French bike geometry, very informative.

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