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  1. #1
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    Rossin Super Record? Please Help...

    Hello everyone. I have had this Rossin for about 8-10 years now. It was recently gone through at my local bike shop and they passed it off as being in very good shape. It does need cables and horns at some point, but its road ready and rides beautifully.

    My question is.....

    What model and year is it? I am about a 54 and a half. The Rossin is a 52, so longer rides, I find myself uncomfortable. What is it worth??? Should I keep it?














    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Vollmerpants; 08-13-14 at 11:35 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member rootboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vollmerpants View Post
    It does need cables and horns at some point, but its road ready and rides beautifully.
    Personally, I wouldn't replace the horns. Horns are only original once.

    Some more pics might help folks here who are willing to help. One from the drive side of the bike, and some close ups of the frame details and components.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
    Personally, I wouldn't replace the horns. Horns are only original once.

    Some more pics might help folks here who are willing to help. One from the drive side of the bike, and some close ups of the frame details and components.
    I'll get some more detailed images posted here soon. I added a few older photos that I had taken with my iphone.

  4. #4
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    Here are some images of the Rossin in its current state. Taken less than 10 minutes ago.


















  5. #5
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  6. #6
    What??? Only 2 wheels? jimmuller's Avatar
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    I've never had a horn on any bike. Never knew anyone who did though lots of people have bells.

    I can't say how that bike might fit you but if it were mine I sure as heck ride it or sell it for a very pretty price. A lniger stem would help with the size issue but you do not want to separate that nice stem from the bike!
    Real cyclists use toe clips.
    jimmuller

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post
    I've never had a horn on any bike. Never knew anyone who did though lots of people have bells.
    LOL!! Maybe I have no clue what I am talking about. It's the rubber surrounds on the brake lever.... I thought they were called horns...

  8. #8
    What??? Only 2 wheels? jimmuller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vollmerpants View Post
    LOL!!... It's the rubber surrounds on the brake lever.... I thought they were called horns...
    Hoods. Can't tell from your pics how badly worn they may be. If they are aren't embossed with "Rossin" or some other unusual symbol you could consider them consumables. On my Gran Sport the hoods are embossed "Carlton" so they stay right where the factory put them.

    Any any case, that looks like a very nice bike.
    Real cyclists use toe clips.
    jimmuller

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post
    Hoods. Can't tell from your pics how badly worn they may be. If they are aren't embossed with "Rossin" or some other unusual symbol you could consider them consumables. On my Gran Sport the hoods are embossed "Carlton" so they stay right where the factory put them.

    Any any case, that looks like a very nice bike.
    Ah, thanks man. Gotta get out and go for a ride this evening. By chance, where would one get these said hoods from? Any good parts suppliers online, or should I try my local bike shop?

  10. #10
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
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    If you really like the bike (and it's a great bike), then do what you have to do to make the bike comfortable. That means in your case that you will probably need a new stem that allows you to raise the handlebars higher. Nitto makes very good quality stems that will do the job. The handlebar may not work with a new stem if it is the existing handlebar is a cinelli as that uses a 26.4 sleeve diameter and the new stem will be either a 26.0 or a 25.4 diameter. I suspect that you do have a 26.4 cinelli bar and stem as that was pretty common on Italian bikes back in the day and the stem on your bike looks like a cinelli 1A stem.

    Personally, I'd replace the stem and handlebar (if needed) n a heartbeat if it were my bike and I needed a higher handlebar to be comfortable.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
    If you really like the bike (and it's a great bike), then do what you have to do to make the bike comfortable. That means in your case that you will probably need a new stem that allows you to raise the handlebars higher. Nitto makes very good quality stems that will do the job. The handlebar may not work with a new stem if it is the existing handlebar is a cinelli as that uses a 26.4 sleeve diameter and the new stem will be either a 26.0 or a 25.4 diameter. I suspect that you do have a 26.4 cinelli bar and stem as that was pretty common on Italian bikes back in the day and the stem on your bike looks like a cinelli 1A stem.

    Personally, I'd replace the stem and handlebar (if needed) n a heartbeat if it were my bike and I needed a higher handlebar to be comfortable.
    Killer! Someone locally had mentioned that I could source a longer stem that Rossin had available from that era that might work. I'd like to keep it as close to original as possible. The only drawback would be the stem height I imagine???

  12. #12
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vollmerpants View Post
    Killer! Someone locally had mentioned that I could source a longer stem that Rossin had available from that era that might work. I'd like to keep it as close to original as possible. The only drawback would be the stem height I imagine???
    Nitto makes beautiful quality stems and handlebars. A purist might sniff at spec'ing Japanese components on an Italian bike but you will not find another readily available source for a quality quill stem which will allow you to get your bars higher. I'd take a look at the nitto technomic stem (which is probably taller than you need) and the nitto dynamic. I'd figure out first how high you want to handlebar to be (usually level with the seat is pretty comfortable; lower than allow you to be more aero but it may not be as comfortable) and then find a quill stem that works. Once you pick out the stem, then find a handlebar that works. Nitto makes beautiful quality handlebars. They are, IMHO, similar in quality and finish to what came originally on your Rossin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
    Nitto makes beautiful quality stems and handlebars. A purist might sniff at spec'ing Japanese components on an Italian bike but you will not find another readily available source for a quality quill stem which will allow you to get your bars higher. I'd take a look at the nitto technomic stem (which is probably taller than you need) and the nitto dynamic. I'd figure out first how high you want to handlebar to be (usually level with the seat is pretty comfortable; lower than allow you to be more aero but it may not be as comfortable) and then find a quill stem that works. Once you pick out the stem, then find a handlebar that works. Nitto makes beautiful quality handlebars. They are, IMHO, similar in quality and finish to what came originally on your Rossin.
    Man, I'm glad you shared this information. I am probably going to venture into that world of modifying the stem and bar set-up. I just love the gear ratio and the way this thing rides. I'd hate to shove it aside because its a tad small. I took it out tonight for a 20 minute cruise. Man does it want to GOOOOOO!!!!!

  14. #14
    Senior Member Gary Fountain's Avatar
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    Hi Vollmerpants, If you change the stem you will have to change the bars with the stem. It's pretty impossible to separate the two with the leather bar wrap on the bars. Don't cut it off what ever you do!!. Together, the stem and bars with the Almarc bar wrap is worth a 'pretty penny'. I reckon you could get about $300 for the combination if your lucky. Don't remove the Almarc sticker either.

    It's a very nice and original looking Rossin and these bikes seem to be appreciating in price. A quick search for Rossin on ebay should give you an indication of it's worth. It would be a bit sad to see your bike changed in any way as it is a real 80's era time capsule. The 'icing on the cake' is the bars and stem though - this is where your bike stands out as being a little bit special.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Fountain View Post
    Hi Vollmerpants, If you change the stem you will have to change the bars with the stem. It's pretty impossible to separate the two with the leather bar wrap on the bars. Don't cut it off what ever you do!!. Together, the stem and bars with the Almarc bar wrap is worth a 'pretty penny'. I reckon you could get about $300 for the combination if your lucky. Don't remove the Almarc sticker either.

    It's a very nice and original looking Rossin and these bikes seem to be appreciating in price. A quick search for Rossin on ebay should give you an indication of it's worth. It would be a bit sad to see your bike changed in any way as it is a real 80's era time capsule. The 'icing on the cake' is the bars and stem though - this is where your bike stands out as being a little bit special.

    After a long conversation about the bike last night, I came to the conclusion that I am not going to change anything other than possibly cables and brakes if it needs it. It's going to be the Sunday cruiser once I get my hands on a daily. Last night was awesome as the weather here in Texas is starting to cool slightly in the evening times. Now I just need to get my hands on a decent lighting system to see and be seen.

    Thanks for the input @garyfountain!!

  16. #16
    billy chuck eschlwc's Avatar
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    velo orange sells hoods for $12ish that will fit those dura ace levers fairly well. use baby powder or some kind of lubricant to put them on.

    if it were mine, i would move the components over to a frame that fits, because (1) they are awesome, and (2) life is way too short to ride a tiny bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Fountain View Post
    Hi Vollmerpants, If you change the stem you will have to change the bars with the stem. It's pretty impossible to separate the two with the leather bar wrap on the bars. Don't cut it off what ever you do!!. Together, the stem and bars with the Almarc bar wrap is worth a 'pretty penny'. I reckon you could get about $300 for the combination if your lucky. Don't remove the Almarc sticker either.

    It's a very nice and original looking Rossin and these bikes seem to be appreciating in price. A quick search for Rossin on ebay should give you an indication of it's worth. It would be a bit sad to see your bike changed in any way as it is a real 80's era time capsule. The 'icing on the cake' is the bars and stem though - this is where your bike stands out as being a little bit special.
    if you want to change anything to make the bike more comfortable for you, do it. The bike needs to be ridden and it sounds like you like its ride too. Simply store the parts where they will be safe and protected from the environment. That way you can put them back on when you want.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Road Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vollmerpants View Post
    Ah, thanks man. Gotta get out and go for a ride this evening. By chance, where would one get these said hoods from? Any good parts suppliers online, or should I try my local bike shop?

    I don't think the hoods look bad. My thoughts are:

    You say (I think) that you normally ride a 52 cm bike, and this is a 54 cm bike. Between the two bikes, you should have the same saddle height. This one looks high for a rider that it fits normally. You should check the saddle height of your other bikes and see if you can make this one match it by lowering the saddle. Compared to the smaller frame, this should have 2 cm less seat tube exposed when sized for you, if the saddles are the same and both have straight top tubes.

    I don't know where you stand with handlebar height, but if this bike is 2 cm longer in the top tube than your other ones, that shorter-reach stem is what you need. It is also marked with the bike company's name, so I'd keep it unless it is really the source of discomfort.

    All your parts look fine from the outside, I'd say the bike shop was correct.

    There was a recent thread about tubular tires. Read it and buy a pair of new tubulars (well, at least one for the rear), install it with glue (can LBS do this? if not talk to us or read the threads), and ride it. You might find the rear gearing a little tall, but that can be fixed. With time in the saddle you'll find out what is really wrong with the fit, if anything.

    If that saddle height is correct for you, then I think this frame might be smaller than your correct size. Usually want to see a "fistful of seat post" sticking out, give or take.

    This is a great road bike, among the best of Italian frames, but lesser known. Age is late '70s to late '80s IMO. It can certainly be a commuter, but adding robust tires, racks, fenders, and a bottle generator set would be a major challenge. Converting to 650 would probably be a no-go. Converting the drivetrain to Campy Ergo, even a triple setup, is definitely possible, but a new current Athena gruppo would be about $900 from the discounters, and you'd still need a 10-speed Campy rear hub built into your existing Mavic rim (it's a good one!). It would be great used as it was intended - long road rides, the longer and faster the better. It's a go-fast, not a commuter. You could commute if you get it fit well to you, are used to a traditional road bike, and use a big messenger bag for your work gear.
    Last edited by Road Fan; 08-15-14 at 05:40 AM.

  19. #19
    Senior Member SJX426's Avatar
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    @Vollmerpants - Very nice bike! It is a keeper in my book. I would clean it up and wax the frame. If I understood correctly, you ride a 54 and this one is a 52 or is it that your inseam is 54? Anyway, help us understand your discomfort. What is bothering you?

    That is an early 7400 DA group. It should be very good riding and shifting.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
    I don't think the hoods look bad. My thoughts are:

    You say (I think) that you normally ride a 52 cm bike, and this is a 54 cm bike. Between the two bikes, you should have the same saddle height. This one looks high for a rider that it fits normally. You should check the saddle height of your other bikes and see if you can make this one match it by lowering the saddle. Compared to the smaller frame, this should have 2 cm less seat tube exposed when sized for you, if the saddles are the same and both have straight top tubes.

    I don't know where you stand with handlebar height, but if this bike is 2 cm longer in the top tube than your other ones, that shorter-reach stem is what you need. It is also marked with the bike company's name, so I'd keep it unless it is really the source of discomfort.

    All your parts look fine from the outside, I'd say the bike shop was correct.

    There was a recent thread about tubular tires. Read it and buy a pair of new tubulars (well, at least one for the rear), install it with glue (can LBS do this? if not talk to us or read the threads), and ride it. You might find the rear gearing a little tall, but that can be fixed. With time in the saddle you'll find out what is really wrong with the fit, if anything.

    If that saddle height is correct for you, then I think this frame might be smaller than your correct size. Usually want to see a "fistful of seat post" sticking out, give or take.

    This is a great road bike, among the best of Italian frames, but lesser known. Age is late '70s to late '80s IMO. It can certainly be a commuter, but adding robust tires, racks, fenders, and a bottle generator set would be a major challenge. Converting to 650 would probably be a no-go. Converting the drivetrain to Campy Ergo, even a triple setup, is definitely possible, but a new current Athena gruppo would be about $900 from the discounters, and you'd still need a 10-speed Campy rear hub built into your existing Mavic rim (it's a good one!). It would be great used as it was intended - long road rides, the longer and faster the better. It's a go-fast, not a commuter. You could commute if you get it fit well to you, are used to a traditional road bike, and use a big messenger bag for your work gear.
    I might have stated incorrectly. I was fitted at the LBS at a 54 and this one is a 52. We adjusted the seat as best we could for my leg extension. The over-all conclusion was that I needed a longer reach steam because I have a long arm span. While they had the bike, I requested the installation of tubular tires. It was done correctly with the day stretching, glue and proper set time.

    I suppose the initial search on how much these frames are fetching online (or at least the seller is asking), got me into thinking selling would generate some good cash flow. The more I researched what it is (still am not sure what the proper model name is), the more I am inclined to keep it and possibly pass it on to my kids when they are able.

    I did go on a ride recently and pulled away from the pack with ease. Some of the bikes on that ride were a range from modern fixed track to urban commuters. This thing wants to go, its kinda scary. I have no concept of how fast you can go, but I did clock myself with GPS last night at 24.2mph in a slight downward run. That seems quick to me.

  21. #21
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    I owned a Rossin with the same components (except the bar) in much rougher cosmetic condition. It was amazing and fast and wonderful and selling it is a regret. I would keep it if was you. I would buy another someday.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Gary Fountain's Avatar
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    Just a question regarding your research into the model - Did you look at this website:

    VINTAGE ROSSIN ARCHIVE

    I find this site very interesting and full of photos.

    Regarding your frame size. The LBS measured you and say you need a 2cm bigger bike frame. You seem to find this Rossin too cramped riding it as well. I do like the idea of storing your stem and bar combination away for another day and fitting a longer stem and trying that out, BUT, a 2cm difference in frame size is quite substantial, and being at the smaller end of the spectrum, I think this may be too great a size difference to compensate with a longer seat post and stem. My guess is that you may need to find a bike based on a 54cm c to c seat tubed frame. As the bike shop has seen you on your bike, I would tend to listen to them - after all, they seemed to know how to fit tubulars.

    Personally, I know I can't ride a bike much smaller than my ideal size of 58cm c to c. I find a 57cm frame cramped. I can, and do ride bikes with a 61 cm c to c frame size quite comfortably. I can go up but I can't go down in frame size.

    (Personally, I have found very few bike shops with any real knowledge of 80's era bikes but I'm lucky enough to be able to 'filter' through their 'expertise' and recognise their real expertise.)

  23. #23
    billy chuck eschlwc's Avatar
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    ^ + ~

    [+ 1 +1 + 1 ... + 1 ... ~]

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Fountain View Post
    Just a question regarding your research into the model - Did you look at this website:

    VINTAGE ROSSIN ARCHIVE

    I find this site very interesting and full of photos.

    Regarding your frame size. The LBS measured you and say you need a 2cm bigger bike frame. You seem to find this Rossin too cramped riding it as well. I do like the idea of storing your stem and bar combination away for another day and fitting a longer stem and trying that out, BUT, a 2cm difference in frame size is quite substantial, and being at the smaller end of the spectrum, I think this may be too great a size difference to compensate with a longer seat post and stem. My guess is that you may need to find a bike based on a 54cm c to c seat tubed frame. As the bike shop has seen you on your bike, I would tend to listen to them - after all, they seemed to know how to fit tubulars.

    Personally, I know I can't ride a bike much smaller than my ideal size of 58cm c to c. I find a 57cm frame cramped. I can, and do ride bikes with a 61 cm c to c frame size quite comfortably. I can go up but I can't go down in frame size.

    (Personally, I have found very few bike shops with any real knowledge of 80's era bikes but I'm lucky enough to be able to 'filter' through their 'expertise' and recognise their real expertise.)




    These two images were taken from the Vintage Rossin Archive. This particular frame matches up pretty close to what I have.

    Here are the specs from his site:

    80s Super Record Rossin
    Rossin Team – 1985 - 1987
    Rossin Team Frame / forks (Columbus SL) 57cm
    Final revision Campagnolo Super Record groupset:
    · Undated rear mech without removable spring· Record friction levers with Campagnolo gear cables and rear `outer’
    · Final revision `Cobalto style’ short reach recessed bolt brake callipers with Chorus aero levers, C-Record perl white
    cables.
    · Non fluted cranks dated 1986, Rossin pantographed outer chain ring (52), inner 42
    · Series 2 titanium / alloy bottom bracket
    · Fully polished seat post dated 1985
    · Record hubs Weight: 9.1kgs (20.1 lbs)

  25. #25
    Senior Member Gary Fountain's Avatar
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    I'd say that that's what you've got too. You own a very nice bike is, most probably, original condition with some highly desirable components. It's worth is appreciating as the Rossin brand becomes more widely known and recognised for it's build quality.

    Years ago, I passed them off as just another Italian brand. I have since grown to appreciate the brand's top flight racing origins that eminated from one man's skill and experience building racing machines for the elite of cycle racing. His design innovation is also another reason for the marque's popularity. I'm now very glad I own one a Rossin like you.

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