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  1. #1
    Ernst Henri mr. peugeot's Avatar
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    Question for those who own/ride Peugeots with Reynolds 501

    What is the ride quality like? How do you like your bike? General thoughts on your r501 Peugeot?

  2. #2
    Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race dddd's Avatar
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    Mine is the one, I forget the model name, but I believe was the very first model to use 501, and with Carbolite fork.

    PH501 maybe?

    The ride is good. Slightly less flexy than my similar-vintage, all-531 model PX10 Super Competition. Handling seems normal, steering feels light.

    The Helicomatic rear hub is the bike's only vice/curse/buzzkill I would say (other than this bike's apparently 22.0 stem quill diameter).

  3. #3
    Still learning oddjob2's Avatar
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    Love it, 1985 PGN10

    Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. Albert Einstein
    2014 Additions: 1985 Trek 560, 1992 Trek Multitrack 700 (my 2nd), 1994 Trek Carbon 2200, Peugeot PX-10, 1981 Schwinn Voyager, 1989 Bridgestone RB-1

  4. #4
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    I had a 1986 PGN-10, with a lugged frame and carbolite 103 fork. It was very responsive and quick turning. The overall ride was a bit smoother than an aluminum-frame Cannondale, yet rougher and more jarring than that of a mountain bike of that era. If you really want a comparison, I would say that it was a close match to a modern base-model Specialized Allez, with the Peugeot being more rugged and repairable due to the steel frame.

    Although I got reimbursed by my grandmother's homeowner's policy when my PGN-10 was stolen, I could not find a replacement and had to spend the money on my car's transmission anyway. I hope this helps some.

  5. #5
    verktyg verktyg's Avatar
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    Throughout much of the 1980s Peugeot used pretty much the same frame geometry on all of their performance models.

    Here's an example from the 1988 US catalog:

    Peugeot_1988_USA_Brochure_FrameGeometryCropped.jpg

    There were several flavors of Reynolds 501 tubing: 501, 501SL, 501DB, 501SB

    It was called 501 Chromalloy-M and was made of 4130 Chrome Molybdenum tubing vs. 531 which used a more expensive non industry standard Manganese Molybdenum steel alloy. The after brazing strength of 501 was slightly lower than 531.

    Comparison sheet

    Reynolds531C-531P-753R.jpg

    Reynolds 531 tubing was made from a solid billet that was heated and pierced with a tool steel mandrel and then gradually rolled and drawn to thinner wall thickness seamless tubing.

    MannsemannProcess.jpg

    501 on the other hand was made from a slab of steel heated and rolled into a circular form then electro welded to produce a thick walled "pipe". This saved the expense of mandrel piercing. So technically 501 was "seamed tubing" but after rolling to the required wall thickness for bike tubing, the metal in the welded seamed area became more or less homogenous with the rest of the tube. True Temper, Columbus and others use this process too.

    Reynolds introduced 501 for economic reasons to compete against other brands of tubing such as Columbus Aelle, Vitus 172 and 181, plus Tange Mangaloy and Isiwata Mangny, all of which were used on mid price range bikes.

    There were at least 2 different wall wall thicknesses on the 501 fork blades: .9mm and 1.1mm??

    The butted 3 main tubes in 501 had .9mm x .6mm wall thicknesses. Note, only the top and down tubes were "double butted". The rest of the tubes were single butted or straight gage:

    ButtedTubing.jpg

    To answer the original question, a Peugeot with an all Reynolds 501 frame (with the .9mm fork blades) should ride almost identical to a Peugeot with heavier gage Reynolds 531 tubing.

    Carbolite 103 was plain carbon steel with about a 1/3 less strength so those forks and stays had thicker walled tubing to compensate which tended to deaden the feel of the ride compared to thinner, lighter tubes.

    During the 80s, the French bike makers started using lighter gage tubing on their performance models: for example Reynolds 531 Competition, Performance and 753 tubes, Columbus SL tubing and Super Vitus 980 and 983 tubes.

    These made lighter more shock absorbing frames which provided a smoother ride (except for some heavier riders on larger frames who found them a little too flexible).

    verktyg

    Chas.
    Last edited by verktyg; 09-27-14 at 07:31 PM.
    Things aren't always what the seem... Don't believe everything you think!

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  6. #6
    Gearhead old's'cool's Avatar
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    Excellent info on wall thickness Chas!
    Given the same tube OD, there is quite a drastic difference in bending and also torsional stiffness between the thickest and thinnest tubing sizes in the table.
    Geoff
    "I think that I think, therefore I think that I am"

  7. #7
    Ernst Henri mr. peugeot's Avatar
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    THanks for the information. Does anyone know what the prices for full 501 and 501/ 103 were in 1985, respectively?

  8. #8
    Senior Member Don Marco's Avatar
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    I've got a 501 Triathlon from 1988. It's got the "internal lug" construction. It's a dang noodle.

    My regular lugged Trek 520 from '85, also 501, is a good, stiff, stout thing.
    Mark
    Crownsville, MD

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. peugeot View Post
    THanks for the information. Does anyone know what the prices for full 501 and 501/ 103 were in 1985, respectively?
    My Peugeot PGN-10 was $400.00 in 1986, but I believe I purchased it when it was on sale.

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