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  1. #1
    Is a real super guy. Henry III's Avatar
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    Im turning into cycling curmudgeon!

    The last couple of bikes I've built have all been friction shifting, toe clips and nothing more then 7 gears. And the best part is these bikes have been getting the most use over my 11spd Chorus and my 10spd Red bikes. They also have clip less pedals which I'm beginning to hate and plan on ditch those and getting some nice platforms. I like being able to just grab a bike and ride and not have to change my shoes just to ride my bikes.

    Even the frame I'm building is going to be 126...possibly 120 and don't see going back to anything in double digits gearing wise in the rear. Reading that dang Grant Peterson book got me! Haha!

    I feel like I'm turning into the cycling version of the grumpy old man Dana Carvey used to play on SNL. "That's the way it was and we like it!"

  2. #2
    Senior Member Lascauxcaveman's Avatar
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    I haven't read Grant Petersen, but other than that, I'm with you on just about everything else. I hardly ever bother with toe clips, though; my foot remains largely unretained.

    I will, however, use a microwave oven to pre-cook a potato before I it pop in a regular oven for 10 min.
    ● 1971 Grandis SL ● 1972 Lambert Grand Prix frankenbike ● 1972 Raleigh Super Course fixie ● 1972 Peugeot UE-18 Mixte ● 1982 Motobecane Jubile Sport ● 1983 Nishiki Landau ● 1984 Peugeot PH10LE ● 1984 Bianchi Limited ● 1985 Peugeot Vagabond ● 1985 Trek 600 ● 1985 Shogun Prairie Breaker ● 1985 Raleigh Elkhorn ● 1986 Univega Nuovo Sport ● 1987 Schwinn Tempo ● 1996 Kona Lava Dome ● And a Bike to Be Named Later ●

  3. #3
    rhm
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    multimodal commuter rhm's Avatar
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    See, there's hope for all of us! Well, most anyway. Tried a three speed hub yet?

  4. #4
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    I have long presumed that's why they created this forum. For us.

    All 120mm & 126mm bikes.

    I'm a happy curmudgeon, even if that is somewhat contradictory. I am that, too.

    Cheers!
    1959 Hilton Wrigley Connoisseur (still my favorite!)
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    (replacing the stolen 1981 Tom Ritchey Everest custom)

  5. #5
    Senior Member Chombi's Avatar
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    Luddite, Curmudgeon, Retrogrouch, Cheapskate, Plastic hater, Neandercyclist, Veloanchor, Wheezer-geezer,.........I say, Bring it on!!, we're gonna have fun anyway!!

  6. #6
    Rides Majestic
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    It feels good to jettison the idea that everything needs to be improved upon every few years. You have seen the light!

  7. #7
    Ding! Bandera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry III View Post
    Even the frame I'm building is going to be 126...possibly 120 and don't see going back to anything in double digits gearing wise
    Why mess around with all of that gearing and freewheeling nonsense?
    Ride Fixed Gear on the road!

    Fixed_Trek.jpg

    -Bandera
    '74 Raleigh International - '77 Trek TX900FG - '92 Vitus 979 - '10 Merckx EMX-3- '11 Soma Stanyan

  8. #8
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by likebike23 View Post
    It feels good to jettison the idea that everything needs to be improved upon every few years. You have seen the light!
    The light is one place I would NOT want to go back. Today's LEDs and rechargeable batteries are a huge safety improvement over what came before, in which 90% of the energy went into heat, instead of light.

    Pumps are another area in which I do not want to go retro -- I'll take a Zefal HP-X or a good Blackburn over any frame fit pump made in the early 1970s, other than perhaps a Silca.

    Likewise, I like Kevlar reinforced tires.

    I also find that I need at least 2x6 gearing, so I need either 123mm OLD ("ultra" 6-speed) or 126mm ("standard" 6-speed). I was never able to get both the 2:1 range and the 6% progression I needed with only 9 usable gears, but I can do it with 11.

    I run road quill pedals with toeclips on all of the road bikes, and I am seriously contemplating the MKS Lyotard clone platforms, again with clips and straps, for the mountain bike and possibly for the UO-8 commuter/beater, as well.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  9. #9
    Senior Member Velocivixen's Avatar
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    So what's a female curmudgeon? (Please be polite).

  10. #10
    Senior Member daf1009's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velocivixen View Post
    So what's a female curmudgeon? (Please be polite).
    Just a curmudgeon...like the rest of us...a very non-sexist word!
    58 Raleigh Lenton Reg Harris Grand Prix, 62 Raleigh Lenton Blue Streak, 62 Raleigh Gran Sport, 70 Raleigh International, 72 Raleigh Professional, 72 Schwinn Sports Tourer, 73 Schwinn Super Sport, 80 Raleigh Super Course, 81 Miyata 1000, 85 Bianchi Veloce, 86 Raleigh Competition, 87 Team Miyata, 89 Masi Team 3V, 91 Tommasso SL-56, 92 Bridgestone RB-1, 92 Bridgestone RB-T, 93 Bridgestone XO-1, 05 Pinarello Surprise, 07 Novara Strada, 11 Raleigh Port Townsend, Royal Enfield

  11. #11
    Senior Member Oldpeddaller's Avatar
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    I thought I was the only one!

    I agree with: No need for loads of gears, if six cogs on the back were enough for Eddy why would I deserve more? Toeclips and good ol' leather straps suit me fine - always have for the last 43 years since I first fitted a pair. I can ride in shoes I can walk in, not waddle like a pixelated penguin with piles. 120, 126 that's wide enough. Tubulars are awesome to ride and tubular punctures are nothing that Real Men should be afraid of (that's me sewing up a tub in the corner of the bar, honest I'm NOT doing needlepoint embroidery

    Also: Saddlebags that fit laterally behind the saddle, ideally made of canvas with leather piping and straps, flint-catchers (tire-savers?), full size mudguards (fenders) with mud flaps and reflectors, down tube or bar-end friction shifters or hub gears or fixed wheels are treasured features of my favourite rides.

    Of course I do have modern bikes and kit as well, but I believe I enjoy riding my 'time-warp' bikes and equipment much more and do so more often. Also, unless racing at absolutely top level, why would anyone need electronic gear shifting? Frankly, on my rides it doesn't really matter if shifting a cog takes a nano-second or three or four seconds - I can lose any time gained, plus an additional two or three minutes at the next red light junction or roundabout. Cotter pins and square taper BB's, 1" threaded headsets and screw-on freewheels are fairly simple to work with, to replace or can be made to last a very long time indeed. Quill stems look really elegant and allow easy height adjustment of handlebars without having to mess around with spacers and if the steerer tube on an unthreaded fork has been cut to length you can't really raise the stem much more without replacing it with one with a steeper angle. It just means the manufacturer can make a 'one size fits all' fork.

    New-fangled things I DO like: I'm with John E on lights and pumps. Absolutely no comparison in the efficiency and performance of both in their modern form.

    High visibility safety outer wear - essential on our overcrowded little island with roads full of impatient and intolerant drivers (hang on - isn't that ME too when I get behind the wheel?), higher-quality clincher tyres than were available thirty years ago, lightweight and cheap wireless computers - no annoying 'click, click, click' of a Huret front drop out-mounted milometer or the huge heavy cable worm drive of their speedometer!

    I also like modern chains - really good quality manufacture at a relatively lower price than even the top of the range 30 years ago. I'm not sure if they last longer, but with a huge number of bikes to choose from, none of my fleet gets the massive mileages I used to do BITD when I had only one or two and rode literally everywhere.

    Another modern invention I couldn't do without is the home computer and the Interwebs, without which I couldn't participate in excellent Forums like this, find and buy products from just about anywhere and learn more in an evening from great people I'd never get to meet than in decades in the 'Olden Days'.


    On balance, I'm not sure if I qualify as a curmudgeon - bizarrely I hope so! What do you guys think?
    Oldpeddaller - The older I get, the better I used to be !!!" ***** If at first you don't succeed - hit it with a hammer.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  12. #12
    Senior Member CMC SanDiego's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velocivixen View Post
    So what's a female curmudgeon? (Please be polite).
    I think they can be variously called:
    Old Bitty
    Blue Hair
    Lemon Sucker
    and Bitter Shrew
    all work, and even Hag was suggested by my family (but I think this was less polite).
    .

  13. #13
    Still learning oddjob2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velocivixen View Post
    So what's a female curmudgeon? (Please be polite).
    My ex, before her morning coffee and on monetary matters. Otherwise not applicable.
    Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. Albert Einstein
    2014 Additions: 1985 Trek 560, 1992 Trek Multitrack 700 (my 2nd), 1994 Trek Carbon 2200, Peugeot PX-10, 1981 Schwinn Voyageur 11.8, 1989 Bridgestone RB-1, Miyata 912

  14. #14
    Senior Member Velocivixen's Avatar
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    hahaha. I knew I'd hear a lot. I'm not a total ludite. I like 135 dropout spacing, modern lights and other goodies. Typically the frames & shifting/drivetrain is my thing. I have Carradice, Brooks, Nitto, etc. but not mandatory. I'm a "mix 'n match" type.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lascauxcaveman View Post
    I haven't read Grant Petersen, but other than that, I'm with you on just about everything else. I hardly ever bother with toe clips, though; my foot remains largely unretained.

    I will, however, use a microwave oven to pre-cook a potato before I it pop in a regular oven for 10 min.
    So, you have left the dark side - except for that potato bit. The Force allows for some weaknesses.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Pistard's Avatar
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    This thread reminds me of a quote I once heard, " I like older things, but sure like indoor plumbing..." I got a nice comfortable carbon bike I like to ride, oddly enough, last Year was the least I rode it... maybe something to do with my ever growing bike harem... all over the garage ready to go, shorts and Tshirt etc, but for longer rides I kit up.

  17. #17
    7-speed doomsday prepper ThermionicScott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldpeddaller View Post
    I thought I was the only one!

    I agree with: No need for loads of gears, if six cogs on the back were enough for Eddy why would I deserve more? Toeclips and good ol' leather straps suit me fine - always have for the last 43 years since I first fitted a pair. I can ride in shoes I can walk in, not waddle like a pixelated penguin with piles. 120, 126 that's wide enough. Tubulars are awesome to ride and tubular punctures are nothing that Real Men should be afraid of (that's me sewing up a tub in the corner of the bar, honest I'm NOT doing needlepoint embroidery
    Wasn't Eddy on 5-speed freewheels for most of his career, while we're at it?

    I dunno where I land on the whole thing. A retro-grouch takes longer than everyone else to adopt new technology, a curmudgeon rejects it as completely as possible while grumbling... the bikes in my household are almost all 126mm-spaced 7-speed steel because that's what I started with and it's treated me well ever since. I'd probably really love a carbon bike with 11 speeds in the rear if I tried one, but I've felt like I shouldn't spend that kind of money until it's clear that my current bikes are what hold me back.

    - Scott
    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
    RUSA #7498

  18. #18
    Senior Member Oldpeddaller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
    Wasn't Eddy on 5-speed freewheels for most of his career, while we're at it?

    I dunno where I land on the whole thing. A retro-grouch takes longer than everyone else to adopt new technology, a curmudgeon rejects it as completely as possible while grumbling... the bikes in my household are almost all 126mm-spaced 7-speed steel because that's what I started with and it's treated me well ever since. I'd probably really love a carbon bike with 11 speeds in the rear if I tried one, but I've felt like I shouldn't spend that kind of money until it's clear that my current bikes are what hold me back.

    - Scott
    Hi scott, yes you're right about Eddy, but he did move onto six when they came in. I'm in the same situation re: a new carbon bike with 11-speed - I couldn't possibly justify the cost until I'm satisfied I am good enough to ride my older bikes to their full potential - which will probably be never! 11 speeds and a stiff lighter frame won't make me a better rider and when I ride my (older) nine speed carbon bike I don't ride any smoother, faster, further or stronger than on one of my 531, Columbus or Vitus tubed mounts.


    Best regards,

    Stuart
    Oldpeddaller - The older I get, the better I used to be !!!" ***** If at first you don't succeed - hit it with a hammer.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  19. #19
    What??? Only 2 wheels? jimmuller's Avatar
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    H-III, you are not alone. I really like my Motobecane's 2x5 gearing. It's simple, it works, it does everything it needs to do. All my bikes are 2x5 or 2x6 (except the tandem which is 3x5), with DT friction shifting. All have toe clips and straps.
    Real cyclists use toe clips.
    jimmuller

  20. #20
    Senior Member Ed.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
    Why mess around with all of that gearing and freewheeling nonsense?
    Ride Fixed Gear on the road!

    Fixed_Trek.jpg

    -Bandera
    Hah, only sissies ride with brakes on a fixed gear.
    Yes, you can have my sew-ups, but first you'll need to pry my cold, dead fingers from them.

  21. #21
    Senior Member rootboy's Avatar
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    I'm only part mudgeon.
    The rest is cur.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Salubrious's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John E View Post
    The light is one place I would NOT want to go back. Today's LEDs and rechargeable batteries are a huge safety improvement over what came before, in which 90% of the energy went into heat, instead of light.

    Pumps are another area in which I do not want to go retro -- I'll take a Zefal HP-X or a good Blackburn over any frame fit pump made in the early 1970s, other than perhaps a Silca.

    Likewise, I like Kevlar reinforced tires.

    I also find that I need at least 2x6 gearing, so I need either 123mm OLD ("ultra" 6-speed) or 126mm ("standard" 6-speed). I was never able to get both the 2:1 range and the 6% progression I needed with only 9 usable gears, but I can do it with 11.

    I run road quill pedals with toeclips on all of the road bikes, and I am seriously contemplating the MKS Lyotard clone platforms, again with clips and straps, for the mountain bike and possibly for the UO-8 commuter/beater, as well.
    I agree with a lot of this but the pedal thing- if you like that Lyotard pedal, get yourself a set rather than the MKS Sylan Touring- the original is lighter, looks better and has better bearings.

    I find I have no interest in new machines, except maybe a fat tire someday... and as the sickness has progressed, I find that I am more and more interested in older and older machines...

  23. #23
    Ding! Bandera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed. View Post
    Hah, only sissies ride with brakes on a fixed gear.
    Riding Fixed Gear on the road is not same as "Fixie" bicycle use.
    One is a century old cycling discipline, the other is something else perhaps more akin to skateboarding on much a faster platform in urban traffic.
    Suit yourself, the 19th century technology works for me, brakes and all.

    Tourmen by Les Woodland.jpg

    I do seriously recommend that anyone interested in Cycling, curmudgeonly or not, to take up FG cycling on the road.
    It takes a serious commitment to technique and proper gear but it is the Real Old School of Cycling, anything else......Slackers........

    -Bandera
    Last edited by Bandera; 12-07-14 at 07:42 PM.
    '74 Raleigh International - '77 Trek TX900FG - '92 Vitus 979 - '10 Merckx EMX-3- '11 Soma Stanyan

  24. #24
    Is a real super guy. Henry III's Avatar
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    I used to ride fixed a few years ago and really got my pedaling cadence in order instead of my pedal...coast...pedal...coast...etc. I used to ride brakeless but ran with a 39/16 setup so locking it up didn't require much effort. But with going back to a classic setup I don't find myself shifting as much or at all during a ride so maybe I might give it a try again. With brakes this times. Lol.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Ed.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
    Riding Fixed Gear on the road is not same as "Fixie" bicycle use.
    One is a century old cycling discipline, the other is something else perhaps more akin to skateboarding on much a faster platform in urban traffic.
    Suit yourself, the 19th century technology works for me, brakes and all.

    Tourmen by Les Woodland.jpg

    I do seriously recommend that anyone interested in Cycling, curmudgeonly or not, to take up FG cycling on the road.
    It takes a serious commitment to technique and proper gear but it is the Real Old School of Cycling, anything else......Slackers........

    -Bandera
    Oh dear, I fear you take me to seriously - I forgot the winkie...

    Back when I was young and dumb I rode my Raleigh Pro Track bike all around the Boston area and South Shore. Even Belmont hill (up and down). Two or three of my better bike stories involve that bike. Alas it is too big for me now (it always was, but now it's really too big), and I don't think my lower limbs would take kindly to the demands of riding brakeless...
    Yes, you can have my sew-ups, but first you'll need to pry my cold, dead fingers from them.

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