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  1. #1
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    Need help with a mikado

    Looking for a little help with my first vintage. A little background, I normally ride a mountain bike (spechy rockhopper) so a road bike is all new to me. I wanted a bike for my Sunday rides which intail twice around a local park then a trip downtown into the city, have a light lunch a ride back to my truck 20-25 miles total. When in the city my bike is left locked to a light pole. I want something enjoyable to ride and doesn't scream "steal me".

    I picked this up for free. Seems to be in decent shape but does have issues shifting. It doesn't always want to change gears and sometimes skips a few. I want to change over to a flat bar instead of the drop bars. (Which I already have) . Can anybody recommend some budget upgrades. I'm not really sure what I would need to replace to switch over to the flat bar as far as the shifters and anything else on the drivetrain. Hoping to have an enjoyable to ride bike without spending more than needed. Like I said this will only be a Sunday bike, not for speed, but just to get out and ride and not have to worry to much when I leave it downtown that someone will steal it....thanks for any help










  2. #2
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    welcome to CV and what a descent find! well you got the bike free, so I guess a $10-25 bucks tune up at a local bike shop won't be too harsh in the pocket to make this bike ride smoothly. and since the plan is just to make this bike a weekend rider, then I would suggest to keep the drivetrain as-is unless you want to take this bike into the next level. replacing the handlebar into a flat one won't be a bad idea if you want a comfortable position, but in case you intend to keep it, then a new handlebar tape is what you need to bring this bike road worthy again. good luck!

  3. #3
    Senior Member randyjawa's Avatar
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    Mikado is a Canadian brand. I have run across one or two, the first being this mid level Mikado Cadence...



    the second a full touring mount, a Mikado Gaspe, but no pictures available at the moment(they are at home in my desk computer, not with me and the lap top)...

    What To Do..?

    First of all, the steering stem is fitted way too high. Be sure to insert to at least the minimum insertion mark. As fitted, the stem can easily fall out, when in use, with a crash the most likely result. To that add that the damage that will occur to the steering tube of the fork.

    Clean, grease and replace only what needs to be replaced. Ride the bike for a while, and then, if it is what you like, spend a buck or two on good tires, cables, brake pads and anything else that you need.

    The key, usually, is to ensure that your lubrication is up to snuff. Clean and grease the bottom bracket, head set and wheel hub bearings. Ensure that the drive chain is clean and well lubricated.

    Stopping is MORE important that going! Be darn sure that the brakes are actually working(test them individually, one at a time, at very slow speeds to start). Once again, new pads are best, but you can often times get by with the old ones for a ride or two.

    Old tires can be dangerous and should be replaced before riding, but that call is up to the person who is going to ride. I tend to run old tires, that still appear sound, for my getting to know the bike rides. The good rubber goes on after I make up my mind about what to do with a given bike.

    The shifting issue(s) is, most likely, not knowing how to shift the bike. That is not intended to offend an experienced rider. The Mikado pictured is a friction shift that needs to have the shift lever(s) trimmed for each shift to ensure that the chain is centered on the appropriate cog. Dirty cables, worn out derailleur, bent hanger, worn cog teeth and stretched chain can all cause or combine to create shifting problems.

    Upgrades are a thing to consider carefully and plan for but need not be addressed right off the bat. Again, ride the bike a bit, get to know it and then consider digging deep into your pockets.
    Learn how to find, restore and maintain vintage road bicycles at... MY "TEN SPEEDS"

  4. #4
    Senior Member zazenzach's Avatar
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    Randy youve got a beautiful mikado there. love the paintjob.


    Quote Originally Posted by vintagepedals View Post
    so I guess a $10-25 bucks tune up at a local bike shop won't be too harsh in the pocket
    I wanna know what bike shop you go to. all my locals charge 10x that amount for a tuneup/adjustment.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
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    maybe you run into some crocodile bike shops telling you everything's not working in your bike. a derailleur adjustments that requires fine tuning at my local performance bike shop here in Roseville, CA only charge me a minimum $10 plus a few drops of lubrication on my chain.

  6. #6
    Aspiring curmudgeon icepick_trotsky's Avatar
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    If you must convert to flat bars (not that I would recommend it), you won't need new shifters. Those shifters are attached to the stem, which will remain the same. You will need need new mountain bike brake levers, because the road levers won't fit. You might consider bullhorn bars instead, so you can keep your current brake levers.

    "Party on comrades" -- Lenin, probably

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